Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Demeter, Gaia, and the Sacred Marriage

In my last blog post, "Demeter and the Birth of the Holy Child," I explored the connections between the Goddess of Agriculture, the Virgin Mary and the celebration of Christmas. Both Demeter and Mary echo the life-giving qualities of the Mother Goddess. Also, they are both associated with the age-old concept of the Sacred Marriage, the union between Earth and Sky. Demeter was impregnated by Zeus and Mary by Yahweh, both of them sky gods. This essay sheds light on the Sacred Marriage aspects of Gaia and Demeter.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Tale of the Horned Skier

If ever you wondered who in ages of ages first invented the art of skiing, this 4000-year old petroglyph from Rødøy ("Red Island") in Norway should leave little doubt.

That wily old Guy with the Horns: father of arts and sciences, wellspring of human culture. Is it not he who brought us Fire and instructed us in its use? Is it not he who taught us to hunt, and gave us the Old Law: to take no more than is needful, and to kill both quickly and ruthfully?

The story of how he taught us to ski has been lost to time. Can we doubt, though, that it was originally a hunter's tale?

It may be that the tale of the Horned One, the Two Serpents, and the First Skis is not, after all, lost beyond all recovery.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Weather is What the Gods are Doing

New to Minnesota, my Israeli friend threw up her hands in exasperation.

Augh!” she groaned. “Doesn't anyone around here ever talk about anything but the weather?”

Well, this is the Midwest. We have lots of weather here and we talk about it a lot. We're proud of our weather, and find it intrinsically interesting. Hell, we have weather here that can kill you. That's pretty interesting.

For pagans, of course, there's added incentive. Earth, Sun, Storm, the Winds: what we call “weather” is what the gods are doing.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Mom's family is from Kansas. The family surnames I'm sure of are Horkman, DuPoe, and Klotz.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    We must be related, Anthony. The family joke is; what do we talk about at lunch? What we'll be having for dinner, of course.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Time was when my brother-in-law Marty complained that my parents and I talked about food all the time. In more recent years he de

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Social Justice: A Pagan Perspective

I gave a keynote talk at the Conference of Current Pagan Studies January 23 on viewing social justice from a Pagan perspective. It went well and while the paper it was based on is much too long for a normal blog post, I have made it available as an article on my web page. After a discussion of social justice at a more abstract level, I end with exploring issues of Nature and race.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Thanks Erin...Fixed!
  • Erin
    Erin says #
    I click the link and it says the webpage can't be found. I really want to read this. Please fix.
APEMEN (HAIRY HOMINOID): Shadow of Humanity

All over the world, myths and sightings about mysterious Apemen abound. The most famous of these hairy hominoids are Yeti (the Abominable Snowman) of Asia and Bigfoot (Sasquatch) of North America, both of whom have captured the public imagination. Meanwhile, Australia has Yowie, Europe Wudewasa (Woodwose), Southeast Asia Orang-Pendek, South America Mapinguary, and Africa Ngoko. Many stories about these various Apemen speak of their wild nature, hairiness, and strength. Today, sightings of these hairy hominoids come from the world’s wild places – the jungles, swamps, forests, and mountains. However, people still see these wild “men” even in settled areas from time to time.

What makes Apemen different from other myths about fantastic animals is that They are believed to exist. In fact, Apemen dwell on the knife’s edge between myth and reality. Throughout the centuries, ordinary people have reported their encounters with these hominoids. Sir Edmund Hillary of Mt. Everest fame reported seeing giant foot prints of a Yeti in Nepal in the 1950s. In 2004, an elderly woman in Florida encountered a Skunk Ape in her backyard. Meanwhile, The Cryptozoic and Rare Animal Research Center of Vietnam is searching for Nguoi Rung. However Apemen continue to remain elusive as to what or who they are.

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Pagan Delivers Historic Invocation at Presidential Inauguration

 AP: Washington DC

Minneapolis man-in-black Steven Posch made history today by becoming the first pagan to deliver an invocation at a US presidential inauguration.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I recently read about honoring Pan at this time of the year and it really resonated with me.  I am not only Hellenic but also a mountain dweller so this fits within my path so nicely, I'm surprised I haven't stumbled across this idea before.  So below I offer a prayer to the Great Lord Pan, who is not dead, only harder to recognize in the madness of the modern world.

 b2ap3_thumbnail_Sacrificing-to-Pan.jpg

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin
    Erin says #
    I think your poem is beautiful. I am curious if you have looked at the old poets odes to pan? It seems that ever since humanity ha
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    Thank you. I have but this prayer is loosely based on the Orphic Hymn to Pan.

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