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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Parenting

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

When I thought about having a child at home, my first concerns followed Maslow’s pyramid pretty closely: how will I care for this child’s physical needs; how will I make sure I understand her developmental needs; how can I help her live a happy and fulfilling life? I did not immediately think of the fact that in addition to caring for her physical, mental, and emotional needs, I’d be her first priestess. Once I realized that, I embarked on a serious investigation of my values and beliefs.

As a younger pagan, I had played with paradigms. I read as much as I wanted, tried on new ideas, and tested out theories and spells. I allowed myself to change my mind as often as I liked. Once parenthood peeked over the horizon I felt obligated to solidify my ideas somewhat. I will of course continue to learn and grow, but with tough theological questions would be in my future I wanted to know how I might answer.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
into the forest

I sent my daughter off to school today. This a big milestone, both for parents and for children, a definitive and culturally recognized step down her spiral path. I delivered her into the care of strangers -- her first time to be supervised by someone unfamiliar. The week before we read books about going to school and I parceled out the treat of PBS shows on the same theme. We talked about it. On her first day I said encouraging things, told her I’d be back, and assured her that she’d have a wonderful time. And yet, she cried when I walked away. Of course she cried. She’s been in my energy field her whole life, and then I forced her to take a step that perhaps none of us would take willingly: a step away from the comforts of home into a strange new world.

(I must say, in today’s age of modern technology I certainly wished that her teachers could have sent me a text to let me know that she stopped crying. They can’t, of course, I understand that. And she stopped quickly, I’m told. Still, I worried until the first hour passed without a phone call.)

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    I love the idea of her first day of school being the beginning of her Hero's journey. Blessings on your both in this journey.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

My apologies for not posting regularly. Here is my excuse:

 

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Teaching your children magickal alphabets could be especially fun ifyou have more than one child. They may enjoy communicating with a “secret code”. You might also want to teach them one of these systems to encourage creative writing or as part of their spiritual upbringing. There are a variety of alphabets you might consider sharing with your child.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

As a parent, whether you homeschool or not, a question you will inevitably encounter is this: will you rear your children in Paganism or teach them about it?

Some parents are committed to rearing Pagan children, including them in all related activities, and passing on a family tradition.

Others prefer to present Paganism as one of many religious choices.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I was prepared to complete and post a new Educating Witches blog over the weekend, but the universe had other ideas.

Rowan Alice Callahan was born on Friday, January 4, 2013 at 8:38 a.m.  She entered the world at 7 lbs, 4 oz, and 20.5 inches long. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Wendy L. Callahan
    Wendy L. Callahan says #
    Thank you Joseph! This is my second. I have a 10-year-old son, Gavin. He's absolutely taken with Rowan.
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    Hey! Congratulations! I'm guessing this is your first? Welcome to a whole new world.
  • Wendy L. Callahan
    Wendy L. Callahan says #
    Whoops, my comment did not post as a "reply" to you, Joseph. This is my second. I have a 10-year-old son as well.
  • Theresa Wymer
    Theresa Wymer says #
    A happy New Year indeed! Congratulations! (And, uh, get some sleep? Good luck!)
  • Wendy L. Callahan
    Wendy L. Callahan says #
    Thank you, Theresa. Sleep works out surprisingly well. It is time that escapes me now.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Some parents approach the homeschool year with a schedule.  Others do it with a “go with the flow” attitude.  If, like me, you plan a schedule for your entire school year, you probably take the holidays into account. 

We homeschool almost year-round, beginning in September, and ending in July.  I break the school year down into three separate terms of roughly fifteen weeks each, with a week off for Thanksgiving, two weeks for Yule break, and two weeks for Beltane break.   We take the entire month of August off as a summer break.  We celebrate the other Sabbats throughout the year without necessarily taking days off, and I incorporate Sabbat activities into our school week.

If we are lagging behind for some reason (more on that in a moment), I may use our holiday breaks for catching up, though I try not to allow this for more than a few days of the break.   However, I try to handle make-up time during the schedule school year by doing a bit of work on a Saturday or Sunday, as I prefer to make the holiday breaks a festive time.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I thought I would cover a slightly different topic today, and from a personal angle, though it is certainly relevant to making educational choices.

You see, I am almost 34 weeks pregnant and, naturally, my mind is turning to all the changes I will experience in my life in roughly 5 to 6 weeks.

When I was pregnant with my son, Gavin, 10 years ago – hard to believe he turns 10 in less than a week! – I spent the entire time pondering what kind of parent I wanted to be.  It was a very introspective time for me.  I do not know if all expectant parents feel the same way, but I spent hours mulling over what I wanted for my son.  Looking back at my pregnancy journal and the baby journal from my son’s first year, I see that what I wrote still holds true the second time around as I eagerly await the arrival of my daughter, Rowan:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Sarah
    Sarah says #
    Thanks for sharing these thoughts. I know first hand how hard it can be to get writing done in the final trimester, but I wonder
  • Wendy L. Callahan
    Wendy L. Callahan says #
    It is very kind of you to ask, Sarah. Looking over the site, I see you cover a wide variety of topics. Since my only prioritie

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