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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in science fiction
Is It Ethical to 'Terraform' Other Planets?

We sure do have some interesting conversations in my coven.

Is it ethical to terraform another planet?

Terraform vb. (Science fiction) To transform a planet so as to resemble the Earth, especially so that it can support human life.

Although we didn't reach any general conclusion, we did raise some interesting questions along the way.

Does the planet to be terraformed already hold life?

If so, how would terraforming impact said life?

If not, does the planet consent?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Being an avid space geek myself (I read NASA Watch and PaganSquare at the same sitting each night), I've also thought
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I remember reading "The Perelandra Garden Workbook" in which the author tries to teach the reader how to communicate with the land
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I like "human gardeners" a lot. Thanks, Anthony. The reference to Perelandra raises in interesting question: are there wights on o

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Planet of the Magi is published

My space fantasy novel Planet of the Magi is published. It features a female protagonist who uses magic and is influenced in her moral choices by her planet's pacifist pagan minority.

The book includes people who follow two different kinds of pagan religion grown from the same root, one that remained on a planet that one that is practiced on a space ship. I proposed that the culture that remained on a planet is polytheistic, and tied their religion to seasons and agriculture and the gods that govern those things, but the ones who live in space developed into a henotheistic religion that honors a single creator goddess. There are also three different magical systems, one practiced by the ship group, one by the majority culture on the protagonist's planet, and one practiced by an order of warrior monks founded by aliens but now including humans. 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
No Ascension for Me

Science fiction influenced me to expect that the next step in the evolution of humankind is to ascend to become a being of pure energy. That philosophy is called transhumanism, and it saturates popular science fiction.

I was born a science fiction fan; my dad was a Star Trek fan, and if I had been born male my parents had intended to name me DeForrest, after DeForrest Kelly. The classic Star Trek had several species of energy beings, and humans were on the path to becoming like them. Many of the science fictions I encountered later in life had that idea in them, too. In some of them, a very advanced human could evolve during his lifetime. In Babylon 5, a character who was a telepath turned into an energy being (and blew up, dangerously for everyone around him, but well...) Characters in Buffy and Stargate ascended and became energy beings, and chose to come back to Earth. I even wrote ascension into my own fiction. In my Punch series, a character ascends upon death. A character ascends in Some Say Fire, too, but that's symbolic; it represents the unification of the conscious mind with the subconscious and the inner child.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Agnes Toews-Andrews
    Agnes Toews-Andrews says #
    I respect your opinion Erin, and that of Loki. All humans I have discovered though, were not created equal. Also I have come to kn
Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, May 2

The spirituality of Charles Schulz' Peanuts is explored. Actress Ruth Negga talks about the new TV series Preacher. And surprises abound as Game of Thrones returns for another season. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment on magic and religion in popular culture! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, April 28

Wildlife returns to Yellowstone National Park. The difference between the weather and the climate is explained. And physicist Stephen Hawking makes a bold proposal for space exploration. It's Earthy Thursday, our weekly segment on science and Earth-related news! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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And This Year's Gene Roddenberry Homophobia "Hall of Shame" Award...

...goes to...

the “Star Wars” franchise

for boldly imagining a universe without gay people:

a genocide of the imagination.

 

Shame on George Lucas.

Shame on Disney.

Shame on Hollywood.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mariah Sheehy
    Mariah Sheehy says #
    I agree Star Trek & Star Wars have both been disappointing in the GLBT representation department, though Star Trek in particular h
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    It's not a genre that I read much of, Anthony, so I'm not qualified to say. Surely there must be.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Can you think of any Science Fiction series or novels that do include same sex couples? I'm sure I remember there being a lesbian
Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, November 23

The prevalence of Catholic writers in science fiction is examined. The new hit video game Undertale is reviewed. And we take a look at Diane Duane's Young Wizards series. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment on magic and religion in popular culture! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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