Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bridey's Spring

Well, here it is, right on cue: Bridey's Spring. What cowans call the “January thaw.”

Winter started off gently—the lakes didn't ice over until well after Yule—but we did endure a foul run of sub-zero highs in mid-January, just to remind us who's boss.

Then, just as we prepare to light the untamed torches of Imbolc (or what novelist Richard Grant calls “the mannerly votives of Candlemas”), it might as well be spring. The air is moist and fragrant, and oh that delicious music of dripping water.

Like Indian Summer, Bridey's Spring has its own painful beauty, that fleeting Yukio Mishima poignancy of the necessarily ephemeral.

Winter will be back soon enough. There's plenty more ice and snow in store.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Tale of Treasuries and Paypals

 

 

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You Can't Always Get What You Want: A Glamour Practical

Sometimes it seems like we're all living in some kind of a prison and the crime is how much we hate ourselves.  It's good to get really dressed up once in a while and admit the truth: That when you really look closely?  People are so strange and so complicated that they're actually. . . beautiful.  Possibly even me." - My So-Called Life, inscribed into my birthday card by my sister (who never watched the show but always knows the right thing to say to me)   

I had been snowed out on my birthday before.  I scolded myself for being self indulgent enough to even have birthday parties still, but really it's the one time of year almost everyone comes out of the woodwork for some reason and I cook my best things and make my best cordials and I think, this is what it means to be happy, just as long as we're together.  I can hold onto these memories for the rest of the year and as the year goes on, all my petty grievances about the day will melt away and I will simply remember music and laughter and be reassured that we can all still pull it together even if it's just for a night.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Sun Wheel

It's one of our people's oldest and most sacred symbols.

If anything could lay claim to the status of "universal pagan symbol," this might well be it.

Yet in Pagandom at large, they're few and far between.

The Sun Wheel. The Sun Cross. The Wheel Cross.

The equal-armed cross in a circle. It's the Sun. It's the Wheel. It's the coincidence of harmonious opposites. Male and female. Rounded and straight. Rectilinear and curvilinear. Up and down. Horizontal and vertical. Movement and stillness. Technology and Nature. Heaven and Earth.

In the Sun Wheel, Time and Space meet and embrace: the world with its four quarters, the year with its four seasons.

Such a deep and ancient symbol. Wherever has it gone?

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Youngest God

Fire does not exist in all worlds.

In order to exist, Fire requires three things: a spark, oxygen, and fuel.

If any of these is lacking, there will be no Fire.

Since fuel is (more or less by definition) organic, this means that Fire exists only on planets that support life. Of all the planets that we know to be, Fire exists only on ours. Fire may live on other planets as well, but this we do not know.

To the ancestors, Fire was a god (or goddess). In the Vedas, Fire is called the Youngest God, because he is constantly reborn.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lisa Kroutil
    Lisa Kroutil says #
    I would even argue that fire is the Oldest God. The sun and all stars are huge balls of fire. The nuclear fusion process that occu
  • Lisa Kroutil
    Lisa Kroutil says #
    I can make fire without organic matter. There are many alternative fuels. For example, the combustion of magnesium metal. In fact,
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Clearly I need to be reading more chemistry. Thanks for the correction!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Balance of Energy

The days are getting longer.  Even if the weather is still winter, I can start to see the energy of spring building as we step forward day by day.  My day job is at a university so the new semester has started and the insanity in my day job is stressful and chaotic.  This reminds me of the energy spring brings.

Spring season is all about new beginnings, fresh starts, and moving forward.  In my way of doing things, I’ve considered over winter what is important, what I need to work on.  I may have (very likely have) made a to do list of what I need to do for my goals – what the next steps will be.  

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
To Goddess

Sometimes in contemporary paganism we're waiting for our language to catch up with us.

Many of the new paganisms are characterized by embodied gods.

 

So how to talk about this?

Possession. An “outside” word. Its implications of violence and external agency are wholly inappropriate to pagan experience, which explains why we don't use the term.

Drawing Down. “Our priestess draws down Hekate,” I've heard people say. This Wiccan phrase at least has the advantage of being vocabulary from within. There's a noun form as well: a draw-down. Unlike the Moon, though, not all gods are above us. (And even with the Moon, it's only some of the time.) Besides the spatial problems, there's the matter of agency. Is this phenomenon really something that a human being does to a god? Is it something that a god does to a human being? Or is it something that two beings do together?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Arwen Lynch
    Arwen Lynch says #
    I have always used "drawing down" because, of course, "my High Priestess told me." I like "to goddess" as an action. I'm not sur
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I wasn't attempting a comprehensive list. Since both "invoke" and "evoke" are terms in more general use as well (e.g. calling the
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    My tradition calls it skinriding. That's specifically a term from the Bersakrgangr magical tradition, and isn't necessarily used t
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Now that's evocative. Is it a recent coinage, do you know? It's certainly well within the ambit of received tradition if so. With
  • Anne Forrester
    Anne Forrester says #
    I find it strange that your list does not include "INVOKING". I thought that was the most common term for bringing a deity "within

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