Culture Blogs

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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

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Polytheism: The Solitary Vice?

It's a Golden Age of polytheist publishing.

To incisive works such as John Michael Greer's World Full of Gods and Steven Dillon's A Case for Polytheism, we can now add W. D. Wilkerson's Walking with the Gods, in which 24 (counting Wilkerson herself, 25) contemporary polytheists tell their own stories. It's a pioneering, and invaluable, study of Polytheism-as-Lived in the modern world.

Sigh. If only the news were better.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    We have several ethnic churches in my area. Lebanese, Greek, and Armenian; all of them hold annual food festivals that are well a
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you. Insightful and helpful to me as someone working in a multi-faith/interfaith institution. Both as a writer and theologi

Twelve Healing Stars is a yearlong project in cooperation with the Temple of Witchcraft that explores social justice through the lessons of the 12 Zodiac Signs. This is part 13.


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And thus, with the “harvest” of the fall equinox, begins a “new day” in blogging, following a couple of years of family needs and then a long recovery from a knee replacement, which, although successful, has been way more involved than I could have imagined. Those challenges, along with intensive (read: time-consuming) physical therapy and full-time work, have more or less sucked me dry and left me unable to keep up with this blog.

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  • Guy Teague
    Guy Teague says #
    great article prof! and happy mabon to everyone. bb /s~

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Jack in the Sheaf

That Jack guy sure does seem to get around. First there was Jack in the Green (you can hear his song here), soon to be followed (to the same tune) by Jack in the Heap and Jack in the Drift.

Here's a harvest version that we usually sing later on at our Harvest Supper, after we've all had a few and the kids have gone to bed.

Earthy folk, pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
I've Replaced "Mabon"  with "Harvest Home"

Yes, I am a Wiccan and I am a staunch advocate for the Wheel of the Year. I have been known to sing the praise-songs for that elegant crucible by waving my hands in the air and intoning--two Solstices, two Equinoxes and in-between there is a time to plant, a time to tend, a time to harvest, a time to rest!

Some of you have seen this explanation--I hope this hasn't been too triggering.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Wining and Dining

Beer enthusiasts may beg to differ, but there is no other alcoholic beverage that compliments food more splendidly than wine. For this Autumnal Equinox, get in the kitchen and see what can be whipped up for a pairing feast. To get your party started right, try the following impressive appetizer and welcome your guests with a glass of dry sparkling wine to set a festive tone. I used it  at a fall wine party a few years back, and it was very well-received.

(Serves 6)
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fine dried bread crumbs
24 large dates, preferably Medjool
3/4 lb. soft fresh goat cheese

Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly oil a baking dish just large enough to hold the dates in a single layer. In a small frying pan over medium heat, warm the olive oil. Add the bread crumbs and cook, stirring constantly, until the bread crumbs are evenly golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, transfer the bread crumbs to a plate, and let cool.

With a small knife, make a a small lengthwise incision in each date. Carefully remove the pits. Stuff 1 tablespoon of the goat cheese  into the cavity left by each dates's pit. Arrange the dates, with goat cheese side facing upward, in the prepared dish. Sprinkle the bread crumbs evenly over the top. (The dates can be prepared up to this point up to 24 hours in advance. Store, tightly covered, in the refrigerator.)

Bake the dates until warmed through, 10-12 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter and serve warm.

For the main dish, cook up your favorite couscous and toss with some stir-fried and roughly chopped fall produce of the harvest. Toss everything together lightly with some extra virgin olive oil and fresh herbs. Serve it up with a fruity Syrah or Red Zinfandel.

Finish with a dessert plate of assorted apples, grapes, berries and locally-made chocolate. Match with a ruby port or a sassy Riesling. Assign each guest a bottle to bring for one of your courses, and be sure to have some mellow, romantic tunes playing throughout your party. If a round of Indian Leg Wrestling breaks out later, don't say I didn't warn you. ; )

Photo "Wines and Vines," by Xedos4 from

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Perhaps, Love

I love You seems inadequate compared to You
All Your suppleness and splendor
But perhaps love is the right word
In spite of the fact that people say that they love tacos
(really they just like them a lot)
And I do like You a lot, too.
But love – is love the right word?
Is the starlight we see at night their real fire?
Can I get a little closer to it without burning up, Love?
Perhaps love is the right word.
Not “I love You,” but because You are love to me.

I had the pleasure of attending the Norse Gods Day of Magicin Port Orchard this weekend. If you’re in the area next year, I highly recommend it – the event was well-run and well-organized, and the people who ran it had the utmost respect for the Gods and for their devotees. They were kind, caring, and responsive of peoples’ needs – not just mine, but everyone in attendance. I got to meet some friends that I’ve only seen online previously during the event and the trip in general, and that was a pleasure as well. (Hi Angela! Hi K!) There were horses for the various Deities and people were allowed to have one on one interactions with Them.

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