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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Pagan Fiction
Heathen Ancestral Wisdom to Cope With Quarantine

From mundane to woo, here’s some simple advice on what to do.

#1: Honor Your Ancestors

We’re all here because our ancestors pulled through much worse times than this.Their strength, pragmatism and a good deal of mystical knowledge are all still available to us. At this time, it’s a good idea to thank them and ask for their support. Honoring the ancestors is a core part of many polytheist paths, but it may be new to you. It doesn’t take much: raise a glass to them, say a prayer, talk to an old family photo. Keep them in your thoughts. b2ap3_thumbnail_othala_20200318-204744_1.jpg

The rune Othala (pictured at left) can really help with this,
through meditation or burning a candle inscribed with it, dedicated to the ancestors. Family is important right now. Even if you haven’t always seen eye to eye, rise above it: these aren’t ordinary times, and you need each other, but don’t tolerate—or inadvertently cause— abuse. Check in with your relatives, especially more vulnerable older folk you may not have seen for awhile. It’s also a good time to sit down and listen to those oft-ignored elders, learning the family stories, and hearing how they learned to cope.

Do this now, because you may not get another chance. While this is always true, current events just underscore this.

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I don't feel right talking about things in this blog that aren't, at least vaguely, Pagan-related. So you haven't heard much yet about my editorial debut, an anthology of fantasy westerns called Gunsmoke & Dragonfire. But I'm very excited to announce that Diana Paxson will be contributing a story!

Diana is known in our community as a leader in Norse Paganism and Goddess Spirituality. She is known outside of our community as the New York Times bestselling author of the Chronicles of Westria, and the co-author of The Mists of Avalon series. As if she weren't cool enough, she's also one of the founders of the Society for Creative Anachronism.

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Winter Fires: A Solstice Story in Two Parts

Part One

Lily pulled on her warmest coat and snow boots, ready for an adventure outside. Snow had been falling for several hours and she loved the quiet that descended when the ground was blanketed in fluffy white snow. Even the coziness and warmth of her cottage could not entice her to stay inside and miss the chance of walking at sunset through the woods that bordered her home.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Robin Fennelly
    Robin Fennelly says #
    Thank you!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Sweetly written and much appreciated. looking forward to the next installment. Thanks! Solstice Blessings, Tasha
A Lost Pagan Classic: Rereading Gerhart Hauptmann's 'Island of the Great Mother'

Gerhart Hauptmann's novel The Island of the Great Mother or the Miracle of the Île des Dames: A Story from the Utopian Archipelago was first published (in German) in 1928, but 90 years on, it still reads appositely, especially for the pagan community.

Here's the story.

A passenger liner filled with women (they're going to a women's convention) is shipwrecked somewhere in the Pacific. Several hundred women, with only one male among them—the prepubescent son of one of the castaways—are washed ashore on an uninhabited island.

There they create a glittering women's civilization, with its own gynocentric culture and religion.

Then something amazing happens. One by one, the women begin to become pregnant and give birth.

It's one of the novel's great strengths that these mysterious pregnancies are never explained. Hauptmann makes it quite clear that they are not, in fact, due to the only surviving male on the island, now grown to adolescence. They arise, apparently, as an inherent quality of the island itself.

Well, but there's trouble in utopia. Half the children born are female, half male. What to do with the males?

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Search of Nightshade

Gee: Witchcraft. Medieval England. Lots of gay sex.

Sounds like the perfect novel.

I thought that the title was Nightshade, but if so, repeated web-searches have yet to turn up any sign of it.

Setting: medieval England. Our hero: hot, sexy, dark. (Is he really a wrongfully-dispossessed nobleman's son—à la Robin Hood—or am I just making that up?) Gay as a goose, of course. Travels all over Ye Merry Olde, having lots of adventures—hem, hem—with lots of cute, willing guys.

Oh, but the true love of his life—the one he keeps coming back to—is the eponymous Nightshade, the beautiful boy back home, apprentice to the village witch.

Plot? I'm sure there was one. No doubt the old witch dies and our hero (I don't even remember his name: probably something terse and monosyllabic like Dirk) eventually manages to save young Nightshade from the evil witch-hunters.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Go ahead and write it yourself. Follow wherever your muse leads you. If the result morphs into a gay leather stocking story set i
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    I want to read that book!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Planet of the Magi is published

My space fantasy novel Planet of the Magi is published. It features a female protagonist who uses magic and is influenced in her moral choices by her planet's pacifist pagan minority.

The book includes people who follow two different kinds of pagan religion grown from the same root, one that remained on a planet that one that is practiced on a space ship. I proposed that the culture that remained on a planet is polytheistic, and tied their religion to seasons and agriculture and the gods that govern those things, but the ones who live in space developed into a henotheistic religion that honors a single creator goddess. There are also three different magical systems, one practiced by the ship group, one by the majority culture on the protagonist's planet, and one practiced by an order of warrior monks founded by aliens but now including humans. 

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