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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Those Wacky Non-Pagans

 

Who you callin' 'cowan'?”  (Marvin Kaye and Parke Godwin, Masters of Solitude)

 

Every community has one: a name for Them. You know, those “Not Us” People. In this, pagans are just like everyone else. Who are they, those mysterious non-pagans?

Non-Pagans. A term for when you need to sound neutral (or be polite). Most non-pagans that I know are pretty amused to learn that they're non-pagans. Permanent resident in the pagan ghetto that I am, I appreciate the educative value of “non-pagan.” (Let's hear it for paganonormativity.) Mostly, though, this is an “inside-looking-out” term; I don't generally use it when speaking with fellow normos.

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Twelve Healing Stars is a yearlong project in cooperation with the Temple of Witchcraft that explores social justice through the lessons of the 12 Zodiac Signs. This is part three.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Goat-Man of the Hindu Kush

The Kalasha are the last remaining pagans of the Hindu Kush. Numbering about 4000, in three adjoining valleys in northwest Pakistan, they are known for their proud polytheism, the freedom (and beauty) of their women, and their wine-drinking.

The Kalasha are a transhumant society. In the spring, the young men take the herds of sheep and goats up to the high mountain pastures, where they spend the entire summer and autumn. In late autumn, they return, just in time for the Prun, the three-day harvest festival that marks the end of the growing season, the return of the flocks, and the first drinking of the New Wine, led by a mysterious figure called the Budálak, the Goat-Man.

The Budálak wears horns and goat-skins, and on the third and final night of the festival, as drums throb around the bonfires and wine flows freely, the women garland him and he dances wildly among them and with them. He is the embodiment of the purity, fertility, and rampant maleness of the high mountains, the realm of the peri (“fairies”), and his role is to bear this fruitfulness to the entire community.

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Pagan savings challenge, week forty-seven:  rising tides

I just finished writing daily hymns to Poseidon for the past month, so I hope readers will forgive a tendency to use oceanic metaphors as I ponder this week in the Pagan savings challenge.  Some economists love the idea that, "a rising tide lifts all boats," although some have questioned whether the sentiment -- which is attributed to President Kennedy, but was actually borrowed by him in turn -- is more grounded in reality, or just a recipe for grounded boats.

With just a few short weeks left, I certainly feel that this tide, crafted of my will, is lifting my boat just fine.  The growing pile of cash I see before me each week is a testament to my will and my relationship with the spirits of money.

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     In previous posts, we discussed places within the earthly realms which were seen as portals to the Celtic Otherworld. We have also begun an initial discussion of the names and attributes of the inhabitants of the Otherworld. In this post we will explore the nature and appearance of the Otherworld realms, as they are described in early Irish literature.

     We have some inkling of how the Continental Celts may have viewed the Otherworld in terms of where the souls of the dead were believed to travel. The graves of noble or important people were richly outfitted with clothes and jewelry, food and drink, tools and weapons, and even chariots - either for passage into the next life or for use therein. Classical reports state that the Celts appeared to have believed in the immortality of the soul, that our spirits inhabit another body after this one. 

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PaganNewsBeagle Airy Monday Nov 24

Today's Airy Monday (posted in advance on Sunday since the Beagle will be out of town Monday morning) focuses on something different: Sagittarius. (The Pagan News Beagle confesses that his writer has Sag rising, so he's got a particular liking for this sign.) And as we just entered this sign on Nov 22, let's celebrate our movement into the Sagittarius season! "Interstellar" Sag energy; E.T. the Sagittarian?; nebulas in Sagittarius; new chemicals in the deep space of Sagittarius; who is Chiron, the patron of Sagittarius?

At her "Gateway Goddess" blog, Cathy Nance opines that Christopher Nolan's new film "Interstellar" perfectly embodies the energy of Sagittarius.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Zap the World!

65 years ago the number of new pagans in the world was negligible. Now we number (possibly) in the (low) tens of millions, in (probably) every country of the world. (Did you know that there are New Pagan movements in virtually all of the Turkic-speaking countries of Central Asia? G****e Tengrism.) (Tengri = Blue Father Sky.) In the course of the history of religions, that's really pretty remarkable. How in the world did it happen?

According to Sparky T. Rabbit, it's a spell.

Yes, folks, Gerald Gardner cast a spell and zap! Here we are.

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  • Linette
    Linette says #
    When I was a kid, even a very little kid, I had this "thing" I did with the Universe. This very wonderful innate relationship wher

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