SageWoman Blogs


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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribe today and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

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Last night of my being alone, in a hotel room, away from my family for training.  Tomorrow I will go to work and then leave for home sweet blissful home!

But for now, I'm sitting in front of my laptop, watching Fantastic Beasts <3, drinking some water and enjoying a chocolate bar while dipping it in some almond butter all the while writing to you fine people.

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May we remember,
that we breathe the same air eclipsegoddess
we drink the same water
we gaze at the same stars
we are warmed by the same sun
and our nights are lit by the same moon.


Our hands extend to one another
and we create peace on earth.   

May there be a song on our lips 
love in our hearts
and courage in our feet.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_1039f6596cec77dfadd9159fc0550ab7--native-american-beadwork-native-beadwork.jpgNative American jewelry is one of the most highly visible expressions of Indigenous culture and art that is familiar to many people around the world. Silver-work, beading, weaving and use of turquoise are widespread components of Indigenous jewelry making, though the nations all have their unique cultural style and materials. Pictured is an example of some gorgeous Eastern Woodlands beadwork.

b2ap3_thumbnail_c60a6000f2231082bade632cb3827e75--native-american-beadwork-native-beadwork.jpgTraditionally, all objects Indigenous peoples created were done so with a high aesthetic value. In other words, utilitarian items (like a hairbrush or a basket strap) were also made to be beautiful. What this means today is that the handles of our can openers would be beautifully beaded or have silver and stone inlays! Even the most "mundane" items were, and still are, elevated to objects of artful beauty by Indigenous peoples. b2ap3_thumbnail_index-bracelet.jpgThis should tell you a lot about their outlooks on life (life is understood as reflecting beauty), their sense of time in creating these objects (careful patience and timeless perspectives), and the reality that everyone had beautiful items (no class/caste system).

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Twists and Turns

Long time, no write. Although I do have three drafts started on the Word app on my tablet, my son had commandeered my tablet after his high school graduation and I had only been lucky enough to touch it two brief times since then.  

Now that I'm on a training trip away from my family, I find that I have pockets of free time.  And, bonus, I have my laptop back!  Had to use it when I worked from home for a large retail company.  But now that I'm in training for another work-at-home job (much better than the previous one), I get to have it back.  At some point I will grab my tablet and transfer the drafted blogs and post them.  So I was getting ready to leave my training day thinking that all I wanted to do was sit and decompress and write when I received a lovely "missing you" email, gently reminding me that I have a warm place to write - exactly what was on my brain.  Someone was reading my thoughts.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Feeling Eclipsed?

The August 2017 eclipse season is upon us. Astrologer's view eclipses as doors closing (sometimes with a slam) and new windows of opportunity. During a solar and lunar eclipse season we encounter a period of shadow. Something is hidden. Then something is revealed. Weather can turn capricious. This summer I have had a sense of waiting for the other shoe to drop. Well, this  month I suspect we will hear multiple thumps on the ground of our being. 

Which may fill you with fear. And I say, in the Northern Irish vernacular, "Catch yerself on!" Which is a less elegant, but more bracing, way of rephrasing Hemingway's "Courage is grace under pressure."

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Thanks for this lovely, cogent piece on the phenomenon known as the eclipse. I always find them fascinating and this one will be e
  • Bee Smith
    Bee Smith says #
    If you live within the pathway of even partial visibility it will feel all the more potent still!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    I do, in central MA.
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    We are going Eclipse crazy over here!
  • Bee Smith
    Bee Smith says #
    I rather gathered that. And they are particularly poten when they are visible from your location. I know that from personal experi

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Face You Give Yourself

          My first husband was in the ROTC in college. After his graduation we went to El Paso to live while he attended officers’ school. My little girl took her first steps there. We lived in a small housing complex with other young families. I became friend with another of the mothers in her twenties. She was from Oklahoma. One of the first things I noticed about her was that living in that hot, dry climate had scored deep frown and squint wrinkles in her youthful skin. Seeing them I determined right then that if I was going to have wrinkles at least they would be pleasant ones, and so I trained myself to notice whenever I started to squint or frown. Then as I caught myself, I would stop.

Some research on the Internet revealed that it takes more muscles for a genuine smile than it does for a frown. Furthermore, the act of smiling exercises the facial muscles and brings more blood to nourish the cells of the face. This I turn helps make us look younger and prettier.  More important, so far as I m concerned is that the act of smiling releases endorphins in the brain. These are feel good hormones that makes us feel happier. So as we do so, we smile more and so forth. This is called a positive feedback loop.

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 b2ap3_thumbnail_BnyCrmoTlsmn.jpg

 

This morning, I intuitively chose a talisman to wear, without knowing why it was the right one for the day ahead. A while back, I’d made the talisman out of Angora fibers (otherwise known as rabbit fur), Cormo, which is one of the softest wools in existence, some other fibers, and two glass beads. (In case it's hard to see in the photo: the three center beads are ones I made out of fibers, and on each side of them is a glass bead. If memory serves, I spun the cord entirely out of bunny fur.)

 

Later today, while on my physical therapy walk through the woods, I meditated on what the talisman had for me today. The first thing that came to me was the gentleness of rabbits. 

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