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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribetoday and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_perugino_047-sm.pngLegend has it that, following the crucifixion, Mary Magdalene fled to southern France, spending the last years of her life in the sanctuary of Sainte Baume. Her relics are said to rest in a church in nearby Saint Maximin.

Whoever Mary Magdalene was in fact, whatever her actual history, the idea of her heartens and strengthens me. For me, and perhaps for you too, she carries the energy of fierce compassion, fearless integrity. A woman interweaving spirit and matter, activating her body-centered power to promote creation. A gutsy woman par excellence.

This sense of woman integrating heaven and earth, sheltering pro-creative power within her body's center, may be as old as human consciousness.

Much of what we know about human origins comes to us from southern France, the prehistoric cave paintings and engravings discovered there. Our ancestors' art, such as the Venus of Laussel, shows our original impulse to revere women and the center of women's bodies.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Venus-de-Laussel-detail-bras.jpgThis limestone engraving, discovered in 1911 in the Dordogne, has been a central inspiration for The Woman's Belly Book. Seventeen and one-half feet high, the ochre-stained engraving dates back 25,000 years.

The Venus of Laussel brings forth a full-figured woman. She rests her left hand on her belly, perhaps pointing to her navel. Her head turns over her right shoulder; she's looking at the horn she's holding up in her right hand. Thirteen lines scratch the horn's surface.

Who knows what the sculptors had in mind and heart when they carved out this figure? Who knows what they meant their work to signify?

As I see her, this figure is using her arms and hands to link her belly with the calculation, the calendar, which is the horn she is holding.

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Renewal and Rebirth

At this moment in my life my relationship to the cycles of renewal and rebirth is fluctuating. I ask for guidance. I’ve been asking for guidance for what seems like months now. It’s been one of those un-thought prayers gliding under the surface of my overactive consciousness. How do I understand the nature of transformation when understanding itself is mutating? When so many overarching moments of wonder field my view, I am not asking the simple questions. It’s this theme that causes me to ask a simple question, for once. For once, I stop being frustrated at the reason for the concept and consider the concept itself. Now the doorway opens. I am in my own company again.

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New Moon in Sagittarius: All Hail the Heart of the Gypsy!

 

“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.” Jack Kerouac, On the Road

The New Moon this month occurs in the sign of Sagittarius () on Saturday November 22nd, at 4:32 am (PST).  Sagittarius is a Mutable Fire sign, meaning that it is a threshold sign, bridging one season into the next, and resonating with the visionary element of Fire.  Sagittarius is the hero/ine searching for the Quest that will bring not only individuation, but ultimate meaning.  Sag embodies enthusiastic, looking-to-the-future, outward moving energy after the inward directed flow of Scorpio.  The mood is now noticeably lighter, and we are compelled to make sense of the truths that were unearthed while the Sun transited Scorpio.  

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Sleeping with the Goddess: The Power of the Sacred Feminine

I twist and turn as the Fates
Spin the multicolored threads
That are the web of life.

Strength and beauty grace my path
And Mother’s gaze softens
As she looks upon my weaving.

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Winter's Beauty - in the cold and wet...

Winter in Britain – it’s dark and it’s wet.  Not very cold, compared to what I grew up with in Canada, but the damp just seaps into your bones.  It’s a different kind of winter, one that I still sometimes have trouble getting to grips with.

The darkness is the first thing that my body has difficulty coping with.  If it’s dark outside, my body wants to sleep. I’m very much a daytime person.  Here in the UK, at a latitude of  52.0594° N (where I grew up it was 45.9500° N) it gets dark a lot earlier than what I’m used to, and it’s not light outside much before 8.30 or 9am in the darkest part of the year.  Hibernation mode kicks in.  I struggle to get out of bed even though I’ve had a great sleep if it’s still dim out. Come summer, and it’s light at 3.30am, I can get out and greet the sunrise no problem.

The darkness has a real thick, heavy quality to it sometimes, with overcast skies and damp air all around you, sounds hushed in the shadows.  Like a blanket, it can completely cover you and, if you like your head above the covers, can seem stifling.  I’ve had to learn to work with the darkness, to enjoy it, to see its beauty.

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 b2ap3_thumbnail_image_20141118-225341_1.jpgYou are invited to The 2014 Annual Hassle-Free Thanksgiving Event.

I started it in the early 80s. It’s no longer annual or face-to-face, but I do it as many years as I can, because it makes me happy. Hey, the silly title alone always lifts my spirit.

Please join in the event, online.  To start, let me explain the event by sharing a bit of its history. 
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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • MaryBeth Lewis
    MaryBeth Lewis says #
    I'm thankful to have my husband. He had quadruple bypass surgery in 2004. In 2011 he losthis leg to diabetes and then in 2013 anot
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    MaryBeth, thank you for demonstrating how we can be grateful despite enormous challenges. I wish you and your family the best outc
  • Linette
    Linette says #
    I'm grateful that my adult children and I have reestablished good relationships after the divorce. Things were shakey for awhile.
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Linette, thank you for your gratitude list, and for being the first person to post one! Best of luck with your health, I know how

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b2ap3_thumbnail_066-Hearty-Thanksgiving-Greetings.jpgThe diplomatic event between an Indigenous nation (the Wampanoag) and English settlers in 1621, in a seaside Native town called Patuxet in present-day Massachusetts, has taken dramatic and far-flung turns in the mainstream American version of what became the holiday known as Thanksgiving. 

In the autumn of 1621, Wampanoag Chief Massasoit and a large contingency of Indigenous soldiers engaged in diplomatic meetings with the settlers over a three-day feast that included women and children. Before this contingency of leaders met with the settlers, the People surely held lengthy council meetings, consulted their nation's rules of law in dealing with foreigners, and engaged in consensus-style voting before any action was taken. Determining the intentions of the uninvited English squatters would have been a top priority.

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