Pagan Paths


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Paths Blogs

Specific paths such as Heathenism, blended traditions, polytheist reconstructionism, etc.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Asatru FAQ: Patron Gods

Frequently Asked Question: Am I supposed to have a patron god?

My answer:  Some people have relationships with gods, and some don't. Some of those relationships are like a patron, like a father, like a co-worker, like a friend to relax and have a beer with, like all kinds of different sorts of relationships. Person A can have relationship type 1 with x god and type 4 with z god, while Person B can have relationship type 12 with gods a, b, and c, and think x god is too scary to work with and decline to have a relationship with them, and that's all OK. 

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This morning I stepped from bed, dressed and walked out onto the land. It was still misty and three dark sentinel shadows watched me. The watchers are turkeys, yet they seem to be shapeshifters, turning into thin old women, wrapped in a dark cape of feathers.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

A diaspora, a scattered and exiled people is held together mainly by shared stories and songs, customs and language. Through space and time, generations and movement, the traditions passed down change. They fade and dwindle, but they also are revived and brightened. They are added onto, embellished. Neighborhoods and cities become their territory, each gaining its own character, each city having a synthesis of all the waves of immigrants that enter its gates. Conquest, slavery, genocide, war, so many tragedies and trauma haunt us all in different ways. Expressing what has been lost and erased and  asking gods, spirits and ancestors why all these things happened, and asking who we are now, what are we becoming, what is this this idea, this great story we are all part of, called America? We struggle, who tells this larger story of who we are, who controls and steers it determines who are the heroes and the villains.

What was the original version of the story, of the song may not be remembered?  There are a thousand versions. How well it is sung or told and whether the people believe in its poetic truth and power matters more. Each people has a story of their journey of how they became American, each is a part of a great story, the story of America.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Presenting Ourselves to the World

It is not a surprise that as it was being founded, Neopaganism looked to an imagined pastoral and pre-industrial way of life as an inspiration.

Modern Paganism's inaugural moment in the United States, about 50 years ago in the late 1960s into the mid-1970s, occurred at the same time that the Romantic idealizations of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Dungeons and Dragons and Renaissance Faires and the newly created fantasy genre and the rosy aspirations of the "back to the land" movement were taking over the aesthetic and emotional landscape of young people: particularly smart, geeky college students of the exact demographic which eventually became the Neopagan base.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mark Green
    Mark Green says #
    There is an interfaith organization in California called PICO-CA (the PICO used to be an acronym, but I can't find for what; proba
  • Mark Green
    Mark Green says #
    Thanks for your comment. >Also here's an important advocacy question, for protection against religious discrimination do non-thei
  • Mariah Sheehy
    Mariah Sheehy says #
    To be honest, religion in general isn't covered much by the media, and when it is covered it tends to be framed in particular ways
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    You make some very good points. I also think, there might be more people considering paganism, if they didn't have this picture of
  • Mark Green
    Mark Green says #
    Indeed! And we need more of us. More of the Earth-lovers. More of the justice-seekers. More of the kindness-dealers.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Living in the Way, Part 3: The Seasonal Way

 

               The Seasonal Way is the way of the Earth. Like the heavens and Sun and Moon, the Earth too dances in the firmament. The Seasonal Way is the way of the pagan. The pagan rejoices in the coming of the solar holidays and the cross-quarter days. The Seasonal Way is the passage of life. The Seasonal Way is full of circles and cycles. Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter are growth, fruition, decline, and decay.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Rites of Passage #1:  Naming Ceremonies

Some time ago, I wrote a piece about Atheopagan Rites of Passage. In it, I described life milestones that might be celebrated by an Atheopagan, and which we as Atheopagan “clergy” (we’re all clergy, since we have none—below, the ritual leader’s role is noted as “celebrant”) might be asked to officiate over.

On reflection, it occured to me that just talking about these rites of passage probably isn’t helpful enough: that having some guidelines for each such rite would be helpful to the community. So here goes the first installment in a new series: Rites of Passage.

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The Hedge: Walking Between the Worlds

The Hedge - Boundaries and Walking Between the Worlds

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