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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in fantasy
Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, December 14

Christmas' most iconic monsters are listed. A comic featuring fairy tales from Asia prepares for its release. And Marvel's new Native American / American Indian superhero's debut is reviewed. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment on magic and religion in pop culture. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, September 28

One Pagan lists her favorite "witchy" movies, a transwoman discusses her complicated relationship with Ranma 1/2, and the late Terry Pratchett's legacy is discussed. It's Airy Monday, our weekly take on magic and religion in popular culture. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, August 17

How do environmental themes play a role in the works of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien? Which fantasy roleplaying game is the best fit for you? Plus, how did the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki impact modern Japanese pop culture? All this and more for Airy Monday, our weekly segment at the Pagan News Beagle on pop culture and its relation to religion and magic!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Banishing a vampire

 

We had to banish a vampire from our community. She came last year and was charming and likeable. She was allergic to garlic and once she moved in, we couldn’t cook with garlic anymore, not without all the windows open and her safely away in another room. Of course the connection between garlic and this vampire was a coincidence, and at any rate, she was allergic to many foods. But she was, indeed, a vampire.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Antigoni Marinaki
    Antigoni Marinaki says #
    Good morning In my opinion if you want to call yourself Witch you must have the open mind to except all the creatures and
  • Celestine Angel
    Celestine Angel says #
    Antigoni, in my opinion, you need to grow up and mature. Some creatures have no interest or intent in living in harmony with you,
  • Annika Mongan
    Annika Mongan says #
    Kathy, that's an interesting question. I don't know where the boundaries are between mental illnesses, personality disorders, and
  • Celestine Angel
    Celestine Angel says #
    Hi, Annika. I think Kathy had a point; I saw a moment in there when you could have helped empower this woman to cast out her own
  • Kathy Parris
    Kathy Parris says #
    Hi I came from similar background, but had pagan roots to start out with. Just wondering, did you tell this individual they were/h

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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The problem with being a book lover is that new, awesome books are constantly being written and published. I will not live long enough to read all of the books on my To Read list. I just have to accept that -- and make all of the other bibliophiles out there just as miserable as me by adding to their To Read lists. *insert evil laugh here*

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Deborah Blake
    Deborah Blake says #
    Wickedly Wonderful will be out December 2nd, so you won't have to wait too long! And I hope Lisa continues with the series too. Ha
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Deborah Blake: "Wickedly Dangerous" was a lot of fun. I look forward to the next two(?) books. I hope Shearin continues her SPI
  • Deborah Blake
    Deborah Blake says #
    I'm so glad you liked Wickedly Dangerous! (I loved Lisa Shearin's book too, and have to go look up the others now.)

I don't often rant. I prefer to praise and celebrate and point people in the direction of excellent literature (or at least entertaining literature). But I feel the need to rant.

First, a bit of background. While I read almost every genre of fiction, I tend to read more fantasy and science fiction than any other type. There's nothing quite like escaping into an exciting, terrifying world of monsters and warriors and wild Gods. I especially enjoy a good witch story: powerful, kick-butt women are awesome. (Not that the witch has to be good, just the story. Ethically ambiguous characters often make the most interesting protagonists.)

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @J'Karrah: found it! It's available through B&N, too. Thanks for the recommendation. http://www.amazon.com/Solerna-Anna-Schubart
  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    There is a book on Amazon called "Solerna," by Anna Schubarth which is exactly a sci-fi book about a planet colonized by Wiccans.
  • Clark
    Clark says #
    I'm a huge fan of Charles De Lint's work myself. Very based in Fey lore and Native American mythologies.
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Clark: adding de Lint to my To Read list. My ever-growing, never-shrinking To Read list .... Which is a good thing! Really!
  • Paul DeThroe
    Paul DeThroe says #
    One shouldn't fear something new. My Suffer the Witch series is far from paranormal romance/urban fantasy fare. Its a R-rated thri

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

Kat and I are reading Puck of Pook's Hill by Rudyard Kipling right now. It's a classic Fantasy story, but what I find interesting is that in the first chapter, if you know what to look for, you discover a lot of esoteric and occult practices shared with the protagonists of the story, and this sharing continues throughout the rest of the book. It's a subtle way to teach magic to readers. Given when the book was written, the author needed to be subtle about it, but what fascinates me is that even to this day you can still find a number of fantasy writings where esoteric ideas and secrets are shared if you know what to look for. And if you don't know what to look for, well guess what? You're being given an education in magic and how it works so that if you get to that point where you actually start practicing you've already got some idea of how magic seems to work.

Kat and I like to discuss the books we are reading together, so we got into a long and fascinating conversation about not only Rudyard Kipling, but some of those writers who've written esoteric secrets into their fantasy. For example, if you've read any of Michael Moorcock's writings you'll find quite a lot of esoteric secrets shared. In Elric of Melnibone, he practically spells how to evoke an entity in several different instances where the character needs supernatural aide. In the Corum series, he focuses in on the magical aspects of gift giving and the connections gods have to people and vice versa. And there's a number of other series he writes in where he shares esoteric ideas and concepts, which I recognize many years later as playing a foundational role in my understanding of magic. As a young, impressionable reader the stories I read fascinated me because of the adventure, but as a magician I can see how my evocation practice has been shaped by what Moorcock wrote, as well as some of other esoteric beliefs and practices.

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