Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

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Paganonormativity

Oh gods, it's Posch being outrageous. Again.

 

An important part of learning to think in Pagan is what I'm going to call Paganonormativity.

The presumption of Paganness.

There's no need to say, “This song is sung only at Samhain and at pagan funerals.” It's enough to say, “This song is sung only at Samhain and at funerals.”

“Pagan funeral” is redundant. (Hey, we invented them.) All funerals are presumed to be pagan unless otherwise specified.

Thinking in Pagan, gods is normative; "God" gets quotation marks, as derivative.

In human history, paganism is normative. Non-paganism is the aberration.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Wait, wait: there's more. It's a woodcut by Robert Gibbings from Esther Forbes' incomparable 1928 novel, A Mirror for Witches. If
  • Anne Forrester
    Anne Forrester says #
    Yes, but where oh where did you get that delicious art at the top?! You really need to give credit where credit is due...
Fix Your Situation: Get to Know Lakshmi During Diwali

If your love life is lacking, if your wallet is empty, if you need a pure straight shot of luck, there is no one who can fix your situation better than Lakshmi.  That doesn’t mean she’s standing around with her purse, desperately hoping to give you everything you ever wanted.  Your mom doesn’t do that, Lakshmi doesn’t either.  She’s known for her capricious nature and she’s fiercely independent.  She also appreciates hard work, modesty and bravery and she’s known to bounce when you start slacking off.

Churning and Churning and Churning

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Jackalope: Barbed Humor

One of the symbols of the American West, the jackrabbit lives in open areas such as grasslands and deserts. With his strange ears, this hare is one of the animals of the American West that people will often remember.  The biggest, fastest, and flashiest of this Family of Hares is the antelope jackrabbit, who can outrun run everything except the antelope (i.e. pronghorn).

The antelope jackrabbit is the source of jackalope (horned rabbit) legends. One joke that Westerners play on new people is to tell them about the jackalope (a large jackrabbit with deer horns). This legendary animal is often seen by people who have had too much to drink.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
RuneSoup Podcast Interview

Deborah Castellano and Gordon White talk ritual, death customs, learning magic by doing magic and -of course- glamour in the twenty first century.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Autumnal Tasseomancy

Ah, fall!  The time to do as our inherited Puritan (women) ancestors would do – drink excessively, wear some scarlet petticoats/yoga pants and invite our besties over to do some divination that we will all swear each other to secrecy about.  While Tarot was possible for our Puritan sisters, it was a lot more likely you’d get ratted out by your father/husband/brother for doing that.  No, instead you needed to keep it casual like you were just kicking back for some competitive Bible reading with your BFF.   So let’s get into the exciting world of Tasseomancy, also known as tea leaf reading!

The first thing you ideally need to do here is to pick out a teacup and saucer.  You could use a mug, but let’s get a little drama here.  If you don’t have one, a thrift shop is the perfect place to get one.  Select a loose leaf tea for your reading, I recommend something dark and juicy.  Put a teaspoon of tea at the bottom of the cup and pour boiling water over it.  Let it cool.  Drink the tea while not eating the leaves (it’s a little tricky, but with practice it’s doable).  While you are drinking your tea and holding your cup in your hand, think about whatever questions you have about the next year.  It may be easier for you to read your friend and for your friend to read you when starting out, so swap cups once you’re finished.  Point the teacup’s handle towards yourself.  Imagine the teacup divided into twelve segments like a clock.  The segment closest to the left side of the teacup is one month into the future and it goes around until you’re back at the handle at 12 months into the future.  Look at the tea leaves.  Do any of them look like a shape or symbol?  A heart or a number, perhaps?  Interpret the symbol however feels right to you.  A boat may mean a trip or journey for instance.  Don’t be afraid to be creative with it!  Tea leaves closer to the top of the rim means that symbol may be more important.  Take notes and see what comes to pass!

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Tarot and #MeToo: Healing with the Cards

Today I have a deep (and for some, triggering) message about tarot magick, inspired by the #MeToo conversation.

This hashtag points out the number of people, both female and male, who have been sexually assaulted, abused and harassed.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • The Cunning Wife
    The Cunning Wife says #
    Thank you for this! These are great ideas, and I've been looking for ways to use tarot for more than divination.
  • Christiana Gaudet
    Christiana Gaudet says #
    Thank you so much for reading and commenting. Yes, tarot has many uses - for inspiration, magick, healing and more! Very often, i

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