Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Melting Old Witch Winter

 Propitiate, v. (< L propitiare, to render favorable, appease) 1. trans. To render propitious or favorably inclined; to appease, conciliate (one offended).

 

The good news: it may not be time to kill the black goat in the back yard just yet.

Not quite.

In pagan lore, a propitiation is an offering that you make when you want Them (or one of Them) to stop what They're doing. As one would expect, propitiatory sacrifices take many forms.

Here in Snow Country, winter started off understated, but late in January it turned nasty. We've been running 20-30 degrees colder than usual (we haven't seen above freezing for almost a month), and we broke the historic snowfall record for the month of February. There's a blizzard predicted this weekend and another for mid-week, with possible total accumulations of twelve or so inches to add to the three-some feet of snow already on the ground.

Fortunately, everyone agrees that Old Witch Winter loves pancakes. Why, I'm not sure—there must be a story out there somewhere, probably buried under the snow—but she does.

So, as I write this, the yeast sponge bubbles away in the warmth of the oven. By the time the snow falls on Saturday, the batter will be nice and sour and stinky: just the way she likes it.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Griddle cakes are the oldest bread that there is. Happy eating!
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I've never heard that story about pancakes and Winter, but I like it. It just so happens that I was lucky enough to find a packag
The Elements: Reptiles and Amphibians

Alligator (American): Water

Greatly feared because of her size and teeth, the American alligator is a shy animal. She prefers to live in her “gator hole” or mucking around the swamp. The American alligator is a keystone species. She creates “alligator holes”--mud hollows in swampy areas. This provides other animals with water, food, and homes. Even her abandoned nest is used by other animals.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
But the Witch Says....

The baby is sick.

Go with the flow, says one.

It's the will of God, says another.

Keep it warm and give it some of this, says the witch.

 

I'm pregnant and I don't want another child.

Go with the flow, says one.

It's the will of God, says another.

Drink this three times a day until you've shed it, says the witch.

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  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    I love this
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    SO MOTE IT BE!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Foundations of Incense: Lavender

I love lavender.  It’s easy to grow, at least where I live, and it’s generally hardly.  Best of all, it’s excellent for incense making.  It powders easily, has a great scent, and is very fault-tolerant.  You can even make incense cones or sticks using nothing but lavender and a tiny bit of binder.

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  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    Great article. Thank you!
Pisces New Moon Reading: Pick a Card (REVEAL is Within)

Pick a Card for the Pisces New Moon. The REVEAL is below!

Here at PaganSquare, I’ll be sharing a spirit animal painting and message from my Elfin Ally Oracle Deck picked especially for the zodiac sign that Mama Moon is currently transiting. Enjoy!

Oracle decks featured: Elfin Ally Oracle & Lefty Oracle
by Kathy Crabbe

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Ghost Eggs

Ostara begins with a hunt.

On the Eve of the Equinox, we gather in the temple, but (O and woe!) the Goddess is gone; so we kindle lights and seek Her throughout the house. She Herself is nowhere to be found, but signs of Her presence are everywhere.

Well, it's a fortnight and odd days till we seek (and eventually, nether-faring to the Underworld, find) Her; meanwhile, the winter-scouring, the spring lustrations have begun. The sanctuary must be clean to welcome its Goddess's Return.

Only now I'm seeing ghost eggs everywhere, eggs that aren't there.

There's one, I'll think, reaching under the radiator, only to find that there isn't.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    What a peculiar species we are.
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    No, funnier....some local lore about a cryogenically frozen Norwegian immigrant dude...
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    You have heard that they're predicting another foot of snow for this weekend, yes? Sometimes--like any wheel--the Wheel gets stuc
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I think that's why Pagans/Witches have so many festivals. So they will have something to grab onto when they turn the Wheel. Like
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Indeed... and then we start making up new ones... My friend in CO is going to be attending something called the Frozen Dead Guy Fe
SER-nun-nos or Ser-NUN-nos? KER-nun-nos or Ker-NUN-nos?

The Old Gaulish antlered god Cernunnos is hot these days. (Ask me, He's always been hot.) So how do you pronounce His Name?

SER-nun-nos or Ser-NUN-nos? KER-nun-nos or Ker-NUN-nos?

Well, how you pronounce your god's name is up to you and certainly none of my business. But if you'd like to know the historic pronunciation—how, for instance, the sculptor that carved the famous Paris Cernunnos relief (shown here in full modern reconstruction) would have articulated the god's name, there historical linguistics can help you.

Historically speaking, we can rule out the first two pronunciations immediately. In Gaulish, C was always “hard” (i.e. pronounced as K).

So, KER-nun-nos or Ker-NUN-nos? One hears both pronunciations these days. (I've never heard anyone attempt Ker-nun-NOS, bless His Horns.)

Well, we can't say with absolute certainty that it's one or the other, since Gaulish has been a dead language for considerably more than a millennium. According to Dutch linguist Peter Schrijver (Schrijver 20), however, available evidence indicates that, as a rule, the Gaulish language favored stress on the penultimate (next-to-the-last) syllable.

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