Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Blood Month

Blót-monað, the ancestors called it: Sacrifice-Month.* Or one could say (as the ancestors did, in their pragmatic way) Blood-month. It still goes on.

Deer-hunting begins this weekend here in Minnesota. Hunting opener is generally the first full weekend of November. (Just coincidence, I'm sure. Yeah, right.) Blood on the leaves.

It's the season of the Dead, yes, but let us not forget what the witches in their wisdom have always remembered: it's also the time of the Rut.** The fawns that Old Green Eyes sires right now will be born about Bealtaine, sure. Blood and spooge: Old Craft in the nutshell.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I am entirely convinced that there is nothing, absolutely nothing, more central to our paganism than what and how we eat. Do we li
  • Jim
    Jim says #
    Like most people in the U.S. I have absolutely no need or intention of eating wild animals. Even those who are so abysmally mundan

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

The full moon is celebrated and cursed.  Those who work in the police, hospital, and so on will tell you that behavior is odder during this time of the month. 

The full moon is about completion.  It is like a pregnant woman about to give birth.  The energy is high and in some cases giddy. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Blogging is a funny thing.  You never know which post is going to take off and which is going to sit there.  Sometimes a post comes back from the dead.

Last spring I published this post merging a trope from The Walking Dead with spiritual practice.  It was meant to sum up a series I was doing on science and religion.  The other posts were popular, and I had this cute little thing where I tied one of TV’s most popular shows into my final thoughts on the matter, so I figured that post would get some views.

Nope.  Nobody saw it.  The post died pretty miserably.  But apparently no one stabbed it in the head, because last month it came back to life.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Kimchi for Breakfast

I opened up this season's first quart of kimchi this morning. Kimchi for breakfast may not be everyone's idea of a good time, but it suits me just fine.

A couple of weeks back one of my covensibs gave me some lovely tender little baby turnips from her last farm share. (Yes, Virginia, witches really do eat babies.) I had some nice plump daikons over from the last farmer's market and a couple of stray parsnips at the bottom of the vegetable drawer. Chop 'em up, mix 'em with green onion, grated ginger, a heaping tablespoon of cayenne, a little sugar, and more garlic than anyone should ever eat. Immerse in brine and let the fermentation begin. Sweet.

We didn't have our first frost until the night before Halloween this year. That's the latest freeze I can remember here. I'm still getting broccoli and collards from the garden—those cabbage vegetables just love cold—and the parsley's still holding on. With luck, they'll keep going till the ground freezes. But we're entering the season of pickles, and I say: bring it on.

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  • Selina Rifkin
    Selina Rifkin says #
    I have the OXO Goodgrips V-cut slicer. It's easy to clean, has a good selection of blades, and has held up well. And it folds up f
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I'll take it as a mandate, Selina: thanks. (I was looking at some on-line just yesterday.) I remember grandma's slaw-slicer as hav
  • Selina Rifkin
    Selina Rifkin says #
    Get yourself a mandolin slicer. You'll love it.
  • Kate Freeman
    Kate Freeman says #
    Looks delicious and sounds even better!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Freya_by_Johannes_Gehrts.jpg

Below is my tribute to Freya, divinity #24 wrongfully placed the atheist's graveyard.  This is my continuing effort to learn about and post something on each divinity placed there.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
On the Cover: A Dream Come True

Whoo hoo! I can finally share some great news I've been sitting on for a while. (It's a little squished, but still fun.) I'm going to be a cover model!

No, not on the cover of one of my books (although there are folks who think that the picture of Barbara Yager, my first Baba Yaga, looks a bit like me on the cover of Wickedly Dangerous -- yes, my abs look *just* like that...snort). And not on the cover of Time Magazine as Witch of the Year, although really, I'm not sure why not.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thirteen Nights of Samhain

Halloween is over and gone. The last of the soul candles have burnt out; the candy (thank Goddess) is all handed out; the squirrels have reduced the jack o' lanterns on the doorstep to piles of orange shreds. (“May squirrels eat his/her face” is one of my favorite curses, but obviously nothing to toss around lightly. Shudder.) But this, after all, is Paganistan. Don't go putting up those Yule lights quite yet. Around here, Samhain is just beginning.

Americans tend to do their celebrating in advance (Christmas begins the day after Thanksgiving and ends December 24th), but that's not the witch's way. Tony Kelly of the Pagan Movement in Britain and Ireland always used to say that the firedays aren't neat, tidy little dates on a calendar; they're extended tides of intensive change during the year. Like Yule, they all have their thirtnights, their witch's dozen of days.

Today's the Fifth of November. (“Remember, remember the Fifth of November: gunpowder, treason, and...what? There must be some reason to remember the season, but whatever it is, I forgot,” says the Kipper family.) Guy Fawkes' Day fell out of favor in America back around the Revolution, but did you ever wonder why Election Day is the first Tuesday in November? Back in the day, Election Day was a bonfire holiday. The harvest is in, but the winter weather hasn't closed in yet, so the tribe gets together to do its necessary politicking. The more things change....

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    If ever I entertained any doubts about why I do this, Susan (and occasionally I do), you've settled them all. Thanks. I'm sure Ton
  • susan
    susan says #
    Thanks for this entry! My Samhain was filled with stress, a major event, and no time for personal reflection. I read this and real

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