PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Sweetwood Temenos

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
It Takes a Shaman to Raise a Stone

Why did the standing stone climb the hill?

Well, I think we know.

Before the Bull Stone began its two-year journey from its natal rock-bed, across the coulee floor, and up-slope to its new shrine, I asked:

Will you come? Will you chance this adventure? Will you receive this adoration?

For these are the questions that must be asked.

And the Stone said: Even so.

Two years, much sweat, and the work of four days later, the Bull Stone now lies, gazing at the sky through autumn's yellow canopy, on the shoulder of Sweetwood Ridge. In spring, we will raise him and, if we do our work well, he will stand in consummation long after we are gone.

And all the while the priestess, the clan-mother, sat at the crown of the slope, singing the song of Calling.

Why did the standing stone climb the hill?

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks for the link, Greybeard. The mysteries of Old, revealed on Youtube.
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    This is my favorite method for raising stones. The ancient Pagans who built Stonehenge may not have had diesel engines and hydraul
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    So mote it be.
  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    Indeed the stone is now full of our intention and purpose. When, at last, it stands at the point of the ridge, it will hold magic

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Turn Left at Aphrodite

Go between the two standing stones into the woods.

Follow the path down to the Great Circle.

When you get to Aphrodite, turn left.

Then head down the hill through the trees.

That's how you get to the Bull Stone.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bragging on the Warlocks

So, I'm going to take a little time to brag on my brother warlocks. In traditional language, this is known as a vaunt.

I'm just now back from a weekend with the warlocks at Sweetwood sanctuary, among the incomparable autumn vistas of the hills and misty hollows of Witch Country's Driftless area.

The weather was miserable, cold and damp. It rained torrentially most of the time.

I haven't had so much fun in months.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Every Altar Is a Door

As keeper of the coven temple, it's my responsibility to make the daily offerings and prayers there on the People's behalf.

This I do twice daily, morning and evening.

(In an ideal world, with a full temple staff, there would be four offerings each day: at sunrise, solar noon, sunset, and solar midnight. Oh well. We do the best that we can with the resources available.)

A fortnight back I was staying at Sweetwood Sanctuary in the heart of Midwest Witch Country. While I was there, I made the daily offerings and prayers before the main altar in the Grand Circle.

There I noticed something very interesting indeed.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    So to light the candles is to pass through the doorway. Nice.
  • Ian Phanes
    Ian Phanes says #
    This is why I always put a pair of candlesticks on an altar (but not a shrine)...the candlesticks mark the doorposts.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
I Love the Doorposts of Your House

You're entering a sacred place. What do you do?

You can't just saunter in, doing nothing, as if it were (say) some big box store. It's a sacred place; going in means something.

So what do you do?

Some reach down and touch the ground. (If you're reading this, I probably don't need to tell you why you would do this.) In practice, this often means that you touch the threshold of the temple.

What comes next is up to you. Some people touch their hearts, some (with a kiss) their lips. Some touch their brows. I usually touch all three: In my heart, on my lips, in my thoughts.

Or some variation thereof. The deeply pious may bow down and kiss the Earth. Those of us who aren't as spry as we used to be may settle for kissing the doorposts of the temple. (I love the doorposts of your house, goes the old song.)

So much for entering. How do you leave a sacred place?

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Little Samhain in Every Bealtaine

Posch, you pervert.

May Eve is days away, and you're writing about Samhain?

What are you trying to do, wreck us?

Au contraire. (And let me point out that our Southside friends and family are preparing for Samhain as I write this).

It's just that this new (to me) idea is so elegant, so true, that it simply won't wait.

I'm just now back from a warlocks' work weekend at Witch Country's Sweetwood sanctuary. We're building a shrine there in the woods below the circle.

This time around we began site preparation, and removed the standing stone that will be the centerpiece of the shrine, from its immemorial bed in the coulee (ravine) wall. The Bull Stone has now begun its long journey across the coulee and up the side of the hill.

But that's another story for another day. (Stay tuned.) In the process, we chopped down a number of young trees, both to clear the site and to provide us with rails and rollers.

You can't move a 1000-pound stone through the forest without doing some damage. Iacchus, Sweetwood's priest-in-residence and caretaker, remarked offhandedly that it's the custom there to offer at Samhain on behalf of all the lives that one has taken during the course of the year.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Raising the Bull Stone

Why do they call it the Bull Stone?

Not difficult.

There's a golden bull buried underneath. That's why they call it the Bull Stone.

Well, that's what they say.

 

Recently the warlocks converged on Sweetwood Temenos in the heart of America's Witch Country, among the hollow hills of the Midwest's Driftless Area, to site the shrine that we'd like to build there.

Last modified on

Additional information