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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in astronomy

Posted by on in Pagan News Beagle
PaganNewsBeagle October 13

Howdy and Good Monday, Beagle fans! Today we have an Airy Monday featuring stories for looking up (astronomy) and looking into the past (archaeology.) First, in space: check out the upcoming Solar Eclipse; photos from an astronaut orbiting Earth; the supercluster Laniakea. Next, in the past: discovery of a shrine to Brigitana in England; the tomb of the father of Alexander the Great; and the great Sex and Death mystery rituals of the past.

Spectators in Western North America will be in a great position to observe the upcoming partial Solar Eclipse, reports Sky and Telescope magazine.

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PaganNewsBeagle Airy Monday Sept 22

Happy Equinox! (It's so fun that the whole planet shares this holiday!) Today our Airy Monday feed focuses on archaeology and space science, with revelations from Greece, European ancestors, Venus figurines, Mars exploration and the wonders of studying space. Enjoy your Monday!

Anyone who follows Greek archaeology will enjoy these recent revelations from a mysterious tomb at Amphipolis.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs


b2ap3_thumbnail_zodiac.jpgWe need not feel ashamed of flirting with the zodiac.  The zodiac is well worth flirting with.  ~D.H. Lawrence

I find that a lot of people shy away from astrology because they believe it is based on incorrect astronomy, and so cannot possibly give accurate information. Perhaps they’ve seen a video by Bill Nye or Neil deGrasse Tyson taking about how the constellations don’t line up with the signs anymore, and that pesky “extra” constellation (or two). Unfortunately, both Nye and Tyson are clearly ignorant about astrology — a great deal more ignorant than most astrologers are about astronomy. We are not only fully aware of the positions of the constellations, the precession of the equinoxes and the fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun (OK, I’ll try to tone back the sarcasm) but astrology is divided into two major branches based on how we deal with the constellations (groupings of stars) and the precession of the equinoxes.

I’m not going to address the different types of sidereal astrology, of which Vedic astrology is one. Sidereal astrology carefully makes allowances for the precession of the equinoxes, because it works with the positions of the signs relative to the constellations. I’m going to explain the basis of Western astrology, a tropical astrology, which determines the position of the signs relative to the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun around the Earth. I find that a number of astrology students worry about learning the “technical” side, but while the math of astrology can get complex, the basic astronomy really isn’t very difficult to understand, and understanding it will give you considerably more insight into the craft than you could possibly have without it. So I encourage you to take a deep breath and jump into the learning — I’ll make this as easy as possible. Ready? OK, let’s start.

Meanwhile, back on Earth…

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

It's time for a new constellation, and this one is entirely dedicated to two brothers. While there are many twins in Hellenic mythology--Artemis/Apollon, Iphikles/Hēraklēs, Amphion/Zethos, etc., this constellation is almost solely connected to one set of them: Kastor and Polideukes. In fact, the main stars of the constellation are named after them.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    It has long interested me that Kastor and Polideukes were some of the last deities allowed to be honored in the Roman Empire, undo

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

It's time for another constellation, and we are moving on to one of the larger ones: the sixth largest of Ptolemy's constellations, in fact. This one represents something that definitely exists: the Po river in northern Italy, or the Istros of Hungry, which was located in the mythical northern land of Hyperborea. The ancient Hellenes called the river 'Eridanos', and that's the name of the constellation as well.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thanks for sharing! That was great...

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

A little over a week ago, I introduced part one of this new series-within-a-series. Like Andromeda and her family, crater belongs to a group of constellations linked together by a single myth. The first part of this series, on the constellation Corvus, introduced the basics of the myth:

"Corvus represents a raven or crow in service to Apollon, who was sent out on an errant for the Theos. He was asked to bring water to Him, but instead, he paused in his quest, most commonly assumed is that he stopped for a meal of figs. When the raven returned without water, Apollon questioned him. Instead of giving a straight answer, the raven lied, and said he had been kept from the water by a snake. In some accounts, he actually had a snake in his talons as he said this. Apollon, however, saw that the raven was lying, and flung the raven, the krater with which the raven was supposed to collect water, as well as the snake into the sky, where they remain to this day. To punish the bird further, Apollon made sure the krater would forever be just out of reach of the bird."

 

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thanks for sharing! How many great stories the ancients must have been able to tell around the fire at night...
  • Elani Temperance
    Elani Temperance says #
    From what I can tell, at least one for every day of the year

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

It's been a little while since the last constellation post, so here we are again. This time, I'm tackling a little one,  Corvus, the Latin word for 'raven' or 'crow'. It comes from the Hellenic 'korax'. It's one of three constellations linked to a myth I will only partly reveal today, as it makes much more sense to place it with the constellation Crater, which will be the next one I tackle.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thanks for sharing!
  • Elani Temperance
    Elani Temperance says #
    Very welcome

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