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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Goddess

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Minoan Birds: Goddess on the Wing

Birds of all kinds are a common theme throughout Minoan art. We find them in natural settings and in ritual art, and in some very interesting combinations that suggest the Minoans worshiped a Bird Goddess.

In many cases, the artist depicted the birds with naturalistic realism, to the point that we can often identify the specific species. These images include swallows and partridges:

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Weaving and Spinning Women: Witches and Pagans by Max Dashu: Reviewed by Carol P. Christ

Max Dashu’s  Witches and Pagans: Women in European Folk Religion 700-1000 challenges the assumption that Europe was fully Christianized within a few short centuries as traditional historians tell us. Most of us were taught not only that Europe became Christian very rapidly, but also that Europeans were more than willing to adopt a new religion that was “superior” to “paganism” in every way. Careful readers of Dashu’s important new work will be challenged to revise their views. When the full 15 volumes of the projected series are in print, historians may be forced to hang their heads in shame. This of course assumes that scholars will read Dashu’s work. More likely they will ignore or dismiss it, but sooner or later--I dare to hope--the truth will out.

History has been written by the victors—in the case of Europe by elite Christian men. These men may have wanted to believe that their views were widely held, but Dashu suggests that they were not.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Hi Anthony, You can order Witches and Pagans thru the link in the blog. Yes, I have read The Dancing Goddesses as well as EWB's ea
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Thank you for the review. I'll try to keep alert for this book. Have you read "The dancing goddesses : folklore, archaeology, and
Promise of Rebirth and Regeneration by Carol P. Christ

"[T]he Old European sacred images and symbols were never totally uprooted; these persistent features in human history were too deeply implanted in the psyche. They could have disappeared only with the total extermination of the female population." Marija Gimbutas, The Language of the Goddess, 318.

August 15 is known to Greek Christians as the date of the Koimisi, "Falling Asleep" or Dormition of the Panagia, She Who Is All Holy.  December 25 is a minor holiday in the Orthodox tradition, while Easter and August 15 are major festivals.  The mysteries of Easter and August 15 concern the relation of life and death.  In Orthodox theology, both Easter and August 15 teach that death is overcome:  Jesus dies and is resurrected; Mary falls asleep and is assumed into heaven.  These mysteries contain the promise that death is not the final end of human life.  Yet this may not be the meaning of the rituals for many of those who participate in them.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
We Got Us a Goddess

(Tune: If I Had a Hammer)


We got us a Goddess

she got us in the morning

she got us in the evening

all over this land

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I love the current memes that combine a photo of a gorgeous white-haired woman with text celebrating older women. These memes convey an important message.

But there's a serious problem: with rare exceptions, every photo is obviously someone who was blonde and fair skinned when she was younger. This gives the hurtful and disempowering message that only blondes can be wise, empowered, gorgeous elders.

We're all beautiful, inside and out. We're each a goddess with wisdom and power. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Elizabeth C
    Elizabeth C says #
    What a beautifully written article, thank you for this. I find it amazing the experiences we all have. I was blond as a tiny one
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Aw, thank you for your kind words, Elizabeth. I appreciate you sharing your story with me. People's stories are wonderfully pow
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Dear Francesca - As Billy Crystal says, “You look mahvelous, dahling!” You really do. I always had a deep affinity for brunettes
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    As always, Ted, your insight, humor, and humility are all treasures. I think we all to some degree internalize the insanity of th
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Yes! Thank you for your wisdom and your beauty.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Lughnasadh, the first of the harvest festivals is traditionally held on the 1st of August. Lughnasadh/ Lúnasa, now the modern Irish name for the month of August means 'the commemoration of Lugh'. Lugh, or Lugus, is a god of law and skill, who in the Irish tales gained the knowledge of agriculture from the tyrant Bres. Lugh is commonly associated with the sun and Lugh is often thought to mean 'bright' in Proto-Indo-European, although it may also be related to 'leug' meaning 'to swear an oath' and even 'leug' meaning black. There are none the less other pointers to his solar nature, at least in Britain and Ireland, such as in his Welsh version Lleu Llaw Gyffes, meaning 'bright one with the strong hand' and the fact that his most famous possession in the Irish lore is a fiery solar spear. That said, connections may also be made between Lugh and the often forgotten Irish god Crom Cruach / Crom Dubh, whose name 'crooked head ' or 'dark crooked one' is also connected to the bowing grain and is remembered at this time on Crom Dubh Sunday, the first Sunday in August. Lugh has traces across Britain and Europe, with several inscriptions to him found in the Iberian peninsula. Depictions of him in Europe are often tripartite, or triple headed, suggesting a triple nature, so this is a god that is hard to get to grips with if we take the original evidence into account, and it may be that this dichotomy between the light and the dark is part of his nature.

In the Irish tales Lughnasadh marks the funerary games of Lugh's foster- mother, Tailtiu, who died clearing the land for fields. It is said that so long as she is remembered, 'there would be milk and grain in every house.'- that is, the land would be fertile so long as we honour her. Another name for this time, 'Brón Trogain' refers to the pains or sorrowing of the earth and reminds us that this time of abundance is due to sacrifice, of the wild earth and also of our own labours, so at this time of summery celebration there are traces of something more sober afoot. After all, solstice is passed, and the days will be darkening all too soon. It's later name, Lammas from the Anglo-Saxon 'hlaef mass', or loaf mass, shifts the focus from the wild earth to the gifts of agriculture, and the sacrifice of the grain spirit.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Mine is the sweet honey
That is the elixir of new life.

Mine are the arms that cradle the
Shell of who you have chosen to be.

Mine is the heart that calls
Out to you when you have
Forgotten me.

Mine is the hand that reaches
Out to you when no solace can be found.

Mine is the light that guides you
On the path back to me.

Mine is the truth that you desire
When life ebb’s from you.

Mine is the womb of light
To which you return
To be reborn.

I began this blog 3 years ago which much different intentions than those where the writing has taken me. Life has interjected itself and time has passed leaving at times gaps in what I wanted to say and what I was able to write. This, all part of the “human experience” where what is accomplished and what there is “time to accomplish” are often out of sync.

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