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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Goddess

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Grace, Air and the Autumn Season

How I Priestess is affected by the Wheel of the Year and the element that I find myself in each season. 

By nature I can get quite cerebral about my spiritual practice, this has both served and hindered me. As I began to work with the Wheel of the Year and implement the four elements into my growth, I found balance. Earth grounded me, water connected me, and fire ignited me, these three elements balanced the cerebral airy nature that I often lean into

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    b2ap3_thumbnail_Guabancex-Comas.png

"Let's not forget our Taíno culture, " Abuela Antonia said.

"Why?" I asked.

"Guabancex gets angry when we forget our Taíno ancient ways.  You don't want to provoke Guabancex," Abuela said in a strident voice.

I swallowed hard.  My six-year old brain did not understand.  "Who is Guabancex?"

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Hi Jamie: Thank you so much for your question. You are right. There is a Puerto Rican legend about a Taino goddess who fell in
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thanks!
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms Comas, Where I come from, in the hill towns of northeastern Connecticut, frogs are considered a sort of symbol of local identi
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms Comas, Thank you so much for sharing the god-lore of traditional Puerto Rican spirituality with us. I always enjoy your posts.
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Hi Jamie: Thank you so much for your kind words. I appreciate your comments regarding the Puerto Rican spirituality. Best wishe
Thou Art Goddess: Claiming Your Inner Goddess in the Summer Season

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Christopher Ward
    Christopher Ward says #
    Awesome article Mrs. Karen thank you fer sharin it
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    Why, you're very welcome Christopher. It's a real pleasure to write for SageWomam.
  • Cindy Freeman
    Cindy Freeman says #
    I LOVE this. For most of my life, I've only allowed myself to feel these things on rare occasions. It's not "logical" or "rational
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You are so welcome Cindy. Yes to tapping into your feminine soul! Blessings!
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You're welcome! And thanks for the wonderful comment.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Mother Priestess

A good deal of my Priestessing has been child rearing as of late, I am at home with a three and a half month old and a three and a half year old. For those of you that haven't heard of threenagers or haven't experienced the joys of a baby that wants desperately to be on the move and talking, yet lacks the skills to accomplish such desires, let me assure you our home is full of great big emotions, including this Mama working daily to redirect her passionate energy away from impatience and explosions and into gentle guidance through the beautifully bright rainbow landscape of emotions. 

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Thank you, I will do my best.Is there anything specific you wish to know about?Let me know.
  • Candise
    Candise says #
    Bless you Tasha! I would love any Crone wisdom that you have to pass on!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What a beautiful piece you have written. In my crone years I feel fortunae o have access to so much that was unthinkable in my ear
The Illusion of Perfect Control

The expectation of perfect control over self or circumstances ruins spiritual health and blocks one’s most precious goals. Finding power and peace in the uncontrollable nature of life is my shamanic ideal and the magical road toward achieving my heartfelt dreams.

 

A common response to someone considered a spiritual master is placing them on a pedestal from which they can only fall. This attitude enforces unhealthy hierarchy and is based on the idea that some people are better than others.

 

Another typical response to the concept of spiritual masters is embodied in the phrase "If you see Buddha on the road, kill him." This seems to refute hierarchy and false superiority by creating egalitarianism. But the metaphor of killing Buddha misses the boat as a remedy because I can't imagine a spiritual master buying into hierarchy and superiority in the first place. I believe an advanced being would teach that all humans, themselves included, are spiritually frail and limited. A spiritual master would not put her or himself above others.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What can I do? About releasing control, (shakes head) what control? Blessed Be, Tasha
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Well said, Tasha! Thanks. Blessed be.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Minoan Fate: Ariadne, Arachne, Ananke

I've been thinking a lot about Fate lately, what with all the crazy things going on in the Big World. Fate has always been a focal point for people's thoughts, and the Fate goddesses of the ancient pantheons have a lot to teach us. What I didn't realize until I had been in relationship with the Minoan deities for some time is that there is a Minoan Fate goddess. You may know her as Ariadne.

My first clue that Ariadne is a Fate goddess should, in retrospect, have been obvious: She has a thread. That's my picture of her up top, the Fate (Wheel of Fortune) card from my Minoan Tarot deck. In the Greek version of Ariadne's story, which dates to almost a millennium after Minoan times, Ariadne is just a girl who uses a ball of string to aid the strapping hero Theseus. But really, she's much more than that.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Goddesses Come Knocking

I don't have what many would call a devotional relationship with many of the deities I paint, but that doesn't mean there isn't a divine connection or other kind of relationship.  Often I tap into other people's devotions for those deities, or have an interesting conversation with those gods for a short time. 

Over the weekend, I just finished a series of 5 small goddess paintings, and wanted to share with you all a little behind the process of making them.

First a little background:
Friday (June 16th) is the opening for the Goddess show at Gargoyles Statuary in Seattle. I think it may be the 4th year I've participated in this show, and this one's a little extra special as I'll also be doing an author talk and signing for my new book, The Witch's Cauldron. However, I'm leaving the very next day for a 6 week long book/workshop/performance tour, so I was concerned about getting art done in time.  I had planned to get one new painting done for it - which I managed to finish last week.  But it's a large and highly detailed painting with a very high price point (if I make it available at all for sale at this time.)

Waste Not, Want Not
I was contemplated how to create a few more pieces at a friendly price-point when I spied the small stack of pine pieces I had cut off a recent batch of panels for shrine prints. Under 5"x8" and lightweight, they were a great size.  Even though I was going to be at an event all weekend, I knew from past experiences that this event tends to have slow periods.  So I painted gesso on 5 pieces, sanded them, then did some color washes on each from the leftover paint sitting in my palette from the big painting I just finished. (It's acrylic, so it would have gone to waste.) 

Once dry, I tucked the panels, a couple bottles of paint, some brushes, and pens - to take with me to the event. 

Calling All Goddesses
The next step was figuring out who to paint.  So I put a call out on my Facebook page, asking folks for suggestions on deities that I haven't painted yet, or haven't done in a long while.  From that list, I wrote down about a dozen of the suggestions that stood out for me.  I did some light research on the backgrounds of the goddesses and historical art made for them. 

Once I was situated in my booth, I pulled out the panels.  Because I had done random color washes on them before I left, each one had a different "mood" to it.  I looked at the list, and the panel in my hand, and one name jumped off: Anahita.  And so she was the first painting, emerging out of a wash of deep Prussian blue and navy pen work. 

The next panel I picked up was a mixture of greens and browns, and Pachamama's name leaped off the page.  In the wash, I could see her peeking out at the viewer with a full pregnant body of earth and greens. 

As I was working on that piece, a third panel nudged its way out - the wash looking like a powerful swirl of deep waters.  Yemaya leaped off the list and on to the panel. 

Two panels left.  A warm purple/earthy panel was chosen by Pele. I started work on her before I had to finish for the day - 3.5 paintings is pretty good for one day's work while tending to a booth!

Next Day
In the morning, I finished up Pele, adding a little bronze paint into her skin, and trails of flowers.  I thought 4 was good enough - in fact, I would have been happy with finishing 3.  But then the 5th panel fell to the floor from where it was sitting under the table.  Well, I still had a few hours....

The panel was mainly a light blue wash and didn't speak yet to any of the names on the list, but I still had purples, yellows, and rust left over from Pele. So I did another layer of color washes.  Suddenly, Ereshkigal leaped off the list - I could see her body in a lamia-esque form swirling out of the colors.  

So in the end, I got 5 of these little paintings done, and made contact with 5 very different deities from all over the world. 





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