Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Loss of Faith

Rufus recently posted (essentially) about how Occultists don't like to show our asses to each other, especially on the intertubes because we're all trying to pretend we are Constantly Crushing It and Living Our Truth and Having All Teh Sex, Money and Happiness All Teh Time.

I've been pondering that.  At first, I was dismissive about it applying to me.  After, I constantly vomit up all my unenviable aspects of life for your viewing pleasure on the regular.  My divorce, my years working six days a week/12 hours a day, my health issues, my Are-You-There-God-It's-Me-Margaret doubts about the after life and let's not forget my constant but confusing litany of don't live like a filthy hamster/I personally live like a filthy hamster.  It seems like I show everyone my ass fairly often.

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If There's a Hammer Under the Table, It Must Be Yule

If there's a hammer under the table, it must be Yule.

Yule being the microcosm of the coming year, we have it from the ancestors that it's a good time to take precautions, what in Anthropologist they would call apotropaic (literally, “turning away, averting”) behavior.

So if in Ukraine you look under the table while enjoying the Thirteen-Course Midwinter's Eve feast (one course for each moon of the coming year), you'll see some unusual things.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_today-i-want-to-cat.jpg"Freedom makes a huge requirement of every human being. With freedom comes responsibility. For the person who is unwilling to grow up, the person who does not want to carry his own weight, this is a frightening prospect.” ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

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FAIRY-WREN: Discover the Deeper Truth

Often seen in people’s gardens, Fairy-wren (Family: Malurus) is usually looking for a tasty Insect. Shy in nature, Fairy-wren is however tolerant of people. Popular in Australia, people regularly see Him in parks hopping about.

Despite his brilliant blue colors, Fairy-wren is difficult to see in the undergrowth. Since Male Fairy-wren is more cautious than the Female Fairy-wren (who has drabber feathers), He leaves promptly when an intruder approaches. If Fairy-wren spies a flying Insect, He hops straight up to snatch it, and then dives back to safety in the nearby bushes.

Fairy-wren’s family arrangements were confusing to many scientists. They thought He was socially monogamous but sexually promiscuous. However what they mistook for Female Fairy-wrens were the non-breeding Males. In Fairy-wren’s small group, there is one breeding pair – the dominant Female and her Partner. Because Fairy-wrens live long lives, They often form lasting family bonds. In their territories, Female Fairy-wrens will nest several times during a season. The non-breeding Males will help to raise each brood, and defend their area. When these Fairy-wrens are about four years old, They will leave their home nest.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Idols and Idols

They have mouths, but do not speak; eyes, but do not see.

So wrote an anonymous Hebrew poet, probably in the 7th c. BCE, speaking of what he would have called 'elilim, “idols.”

Of course he misses the point.

As anyone who actually lives with idols (for want of a better word) can tell you, they actually do speak and they do see; their interaction with their—um, worshipers—is subtle but undeniable. But perhaps that's a little too conceptually non-literal for your average dyspeptic 7th century Yahwist.

Likewise beyond his comprehension was the fact that the idol's obvious limitations are precisely part of the shining truth that it embodies.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

If you read only one pagan novel this year, let it be Paul Kingsnorth's The Wake.

The emergence of post-apocalypse narrative in early “twenty-first” century fiction, cinema, and television is an intriguing and suggestive phenomenon, offering rich possibilities for satire, cultural critique, and reflection on direction for possible futures. (I have written previously about the genre in modern pagan fiction.)

But of course, as every pagan knows, when it comes to Apocalypse, we've already been there and done that. In human history, Ragnarok comes again and again. This is how Kingsnorth can characterize his novel, now newly released in the US and currently long-listed for the prestigious Booker Prize, as “a post-apocalyptic novel set 1000 years in the past.”

Imagine that you've lost everything: your home, your possessions, your family, your culture itself, even your gods. This is the tale that Kingsnorth tells in The Wake. The year is 1066.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Nancy Chase
    Nancy Chase says #
    I definitely think the book speaks a warning for modern times, in the voice of the distant past. Reading between the lines, so mu
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Glad to hear it, Nancy, and good reading to you. It's an honest book, emotionally difficult, and the fact that Buccmaster is no gr
  • Nancy Chase
    Nancy Chase says #
    Thank you for this review! I bought the book and started reading it last night. Already I can tell what a masterpiece it is. I

Happy 12th Night! Tomorrow is a traditional day for Yule-ish decorations to be tucked away for another day--and it's time to prepare your Yule evergreen for a year of wonder as we craft ritual items from its trunk, branches and balsam...

b2ap3_thumbnail_Robin-Breakdown.jpg

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