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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Earth Goddess

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tale of a Triple Goddess

They say that in ages of ages, Earth gave birth to Moon, her first-born daughter and other self.

The size-ratio of our planet to its moon is anomalous in the solar system. In many ways, the two look more like a binary planet than a planet and moon.

In Moon, it is said, we behold Earth's knowledge of self.

It is believed that the moon accreted from material expelled from what is now the Pacific Ocean, perhaps as the result of impact, some 4.5 billion years ago.

She then gave birth to Sea, it is said: Earth's daughter and other self, born of her longing for Moon, and imprint of her love for self and daughter.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

 

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Huracán was the supreme Taíno god, said Mr. Colón, my history teacher.

As a ten-year-old student, I did not control my enthusiasm:

No, I replied, it was Atabeyra.

What! Mr. Colón shouted, as he hit his desk with a ruler. 

Silence crept into the room like a mouse during siesta time.  

Every child in class seemed to stop breathing.  Suddenly, I felt my face turning red. 

Ruler in hand, Mr. Colón slowly walked toward my seat: What, he repeated as he reached me.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Comas, Thanks for sharing this! Your grandmother did a great service to the gods, and all her people.
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Thank you so much, Jamie: I sincerely appreciate your comment.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Demeter, Gaia, and the Sacred Marriage

In my last blog post, "Demeter and the Birth of the Holy Child," I explored the connections between the Goddess of Agriculture, the Virgin Mary and the celebration of Christmas. Both Demeter and Mary echo the life-giving qualities of the Mother Goddess. Also, they are both associated with the age-old concept of the Sacred Marriage, the union between Earth and Sky. Demeter was impregnated by Zeus and Mary by Yahweh, both of them sky gods. This essay sheds light on the Sacred Marriage aspects of Gaia and Demeter.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Goddess Earth

It all begins with Earth.

Recently, at the Summerland Spirit gathering, I spent a day in walking meditation, fasting, naked, covered with ash. I'd suspected beforehand that I might be bored. Nothing could have been further from the truth. That day was the busiest I've spent in a long time. They say that the naked ascetic sitting beneath the tree has fought and won more battles than the bravest warrior.

So there I was, sitting under a white oak in the mid-afternoon heat, reeling with the concept: Goddess Earth.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Breakfast of Giantesses

The year's first favas are in, thank Goddess. It really must be spring.

Vicia faba. Broad beans. Horse beans. Windsor beans. Under their many names, they are the Original Bean, one of humanity's very oldest cultigens; we've been eating them for the past 12,000 years or so, since the end of the last Ice Age. They're the Old World's only true beans, the ones Jack sold the cow for; all the rest, incredibly, come from the New World. Fava beans.

Once long ago, they say, on the southern Mediterranean island of Gozo there lived a Giantess. One day she decided to build two houses: one for herself, and one for her daughter. She carried her daughter on her hip and the stones—I've seen them myself, and many are as big as automobiles—on her head. From these she built two beautiful big houses, one for herself, and one for her daughter. How did she manage to heft such massive stones? Well, she ate magical fava beans, of course, which gave her magical strength.

Then there came a terrible drought, and the crop of favas failed. The hungry Giantess (and presumably her daughter as well) sank down into the Earth. They are there still.

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      "A goddess!" I exclaimed, as I approached a large rounded feminine figure in the National Museum of Ethiopia.

      "No!" A man's voice echoed throughout the room.

   When he noticed people's glances upon him, the museum guide lowered his voice: "That piece is a very, very old", he said hesitantly.  "It is pagan.  She comes from the Oromo people, the largest ethnic group here in Ethiopia."

   I could not peel my eyes off the figure.  The unexpected discovery piqued my interest.

  "Does she have a name?" I asked hopefully.

   Instead of answering my question, the guide told me about Ethiopia's most famous woman:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
My Quick Visit to an Amazing Underworld

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