Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Throng of Boars

In the old Witch language, the constellation that we know as Orion was called Eofor-ðring: literally, “Boar-throng.”

We don't know why.

It's likely that there was once a story to explain the name. Doubtless this Ever-thring (as we would say today), this throng of boars, belonged to—or was defeated, or captured, by—some god or hero, and ended up in the sky as a result.

We'll never know.

Boars were meaningful to the ancestors. Their likeness appeared on battle-gear. Boars are fiercely protective, and nothing stops them. You can always recognize a boar-spear because it's got a cross-bar. If it didn't, the spitted boar would drive his own body up along the spear-shaft, just to get at you. Seriously.

In Old Norse mythology, the boar belongs to the phallic god Frey, whom some would identify (controversially) with the God of Witches. His name means “lord.” The Anglo-Saxons had the same word with the same meaning—fréa—but whether to them it also was the name of a god we simply don't, and probably never will, know.

So much has been lost since the old days, like the story of the Ever-thring. What has come down to us has come down to us in pieces.

And thereby hangs a mandate.

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Affirmations with the Tarot - Using the Power of Imagery and Symbols to Create the Life You Want

My new Affirmations with the Tarot eBook is now available! Woohoo! 20 affirmations for EACH card. That's 1,560 affirmations!

Affirmations are a wonderful compliment to gratitude practice, and help steer your emotions, thought processes and life in the direction you want to go. Coupling them with the symbolic images of Tarot makes them even more powerful.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Congrats on another book!
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Thank you so much, Francesca! XO

Women and the feminine were a major but not decisive thread in the presidential campaign that elected Donald Trump Nov 8. Not only was his behavior and words regarding women execrable, he was running against one. In terms of the popular vote, she won. In terms of the electoral vote, which gives the advantage to small rural states because they elect two Senators and so have two additional votes no matter how tiny their population, she lost. More specifically, Clinton won in the cities and lost in rural areas. She won the most votes but not in the countryside.

And the nature of this difference is a clue to one of the most important long term trends this election revealed.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    Fascinating article. Thank you
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I'm slowly making my way through "The Coming of the Cosmic Christ" by Matthew Fox. He writes a lot about mysticism and the divine

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Burning Local

Well, that's it, then: the last of the sweetgrass braided.

Summer braiding for winter burning.

Sweetgrass, cedar, sage: here up North, our trinity of local incenses.

There's copal, of course: exotic resin of the fabled southern Lands of Ever-Summer.

But mostly, we burn local, just as we always have.

Back in the Old World, it was the same. Frankincense, myrrh: exotic imports from the resin-cultures to the South.

Up North, we mostly burned local.

There's no common Indo-European word for incense (the old Witch word was reckels, literally “little smokes”), but if the IE-speaking ancestors did indeed have an incense culture, one could perhaps make a case for juniper, still burned as a sacred smoke in the Gaelic-speaking Hebrides, in Germany on Weihnachtsabend, and among the Kalasha, the last remaining pagans of the Hindu Kush.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
WHERE TO SOURCE YOUR QUARTZ CRYSTAL

The question often comes up: "Where it is acceptable to find and purchase (adopt) quartz crystal?". I'm not talking about where it comes from in the Earth, but what are acceptable sources available for a person to gather their working collection/family of crystals.

If you live too far away to dig your own, there are plenty of great options available. Even if you are in a town that (gasp!) doesn't have a store with gemstones. Among the options are the obvious, such as; gemstone stores and shops, gem and mineral shows, spirit fairs and festivals. Other not-so-obvious places where I have found crystals are craft stores (often drilled, for beads), flea markets, antique stores, garage/tag/estate or yard sales, second-hand stores and roadside vendors.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagans Are Pagans Everywhere

The Two Arrows

When the Kalasha people first entered Rumbur Valley, their greatest shaman, Naga Dehár, stood at the pass with his back to Afghanistan. He fired two arrows, one red and one black. Where the black arrow landed, they built the altar to Sájigor, still the most sacred place in the Kalasha valleys.

Where the red arrow landed, they built the first bashali—the women's moon-house (Maggi 47).

 

It's as if one were to discover an ancient Celtic tribe living up in the mountains, still practicing their old religion.

The Kalasha are a people some 4000-strong who live in three remote valleys in the Hindu Kush mountains of what is now Pakistan. They are known far and wide for their wine-drinking, for the beauty (and social freedom) of their women, and for their proudly polytheist religion, which in many ways more closely resembles pre-Hindu Vedic religion than anything else.

With their pantheon of gods and goddesses, animal sacrifices, and sacred dances, the Kalasha are probably as close as we will ever come to the Indo-European ancestors.

The more that I learn more about the Kalasha, the more struck I am by just how familiar they seem.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Series: Hexworld

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