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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in pagan music

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Songs of the Northern Tribes

In support of Gaia Gathering: the Canadian National Pagan Conference, thirteen artists have come together to create an anthology of Canadian Pagan music and spoken word.  Only available online, this album spans thirty years and includes some of the best of out-of-print Pagan classics as well as some up-and-comers.  All artists have donated the use of their work: all profits from the sale of the album go directly to support the Conference.

Featured artists: Vanessa Cardui, Tara Rice, the Ancient Gods, JD Hobbes, Brendan Myers, Dano Hammer, the Dragon Ritual Drummers, Gallows Hill, Heather Dale, Tamarra James, Raven's Call, Sable Aradia,and Parnassus (Chalice & Blade).

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Sumer Is Icumen In

I thought I'd get the jump on Beltane and talk about everyone's favourite May Day song (even if you're not on Summer Isle) as it is a great piece of history. 'Sumer is icumen in' also known as the 'cuckoo song' embodies that glorious sense of happiness that the first real warm days offer us. Here in the north we still can't quite believe that summer is a-coming, which makes me want to sing it even more.

This is the earliest secular song recorded in English in the Middle Ages and appears in a 13th century manuscript along with a Latin version. Here's the original lyrics:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Thanks for this. It's one of my favorite May songs, too. I've taught it many, many places around the country. I think the dir
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    That sounds wonderful. If it helps any, early English is simpler than modern English which has even more influences. Blessed Belta
Mama Gina: From Solitaire to Full Circle

Today I’m chatting with Mama Gina LaMonte, Pagan musician, bard, and wise woman. She is well-known on the Pagan festival circuit, and her music is known for being bluesy and spirit-touched. From Tricksters to Fae to Kali Ma, Mama Gina’s never met a Muse that she couldn’t turn into music.

HF: How long have you been a musician?
MG: I started playing guitar and writing songs when I was in the 4th grade. I wouldn't exactly call that being a musician, but I always knew I was going to do this in some way. By the time I was 16, I was singing in a duo, and went on the road with a showband when I was 19. I'm 53 now. You do the math. It's been a while.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs

The final frontier! 

Ok i won't say the whole thing, but you know what I mean!  It's been half a year since I posted, and let me tell you, my life has been good!  I got a beautiful new job that I love with all my heart, and I just wrapped up a weekend of paying singing gigs that was exhausting but magical, for all that I had to sit through one of the most ridiculous sermons i can remember.  

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

As with every year, this year’s Pantheacon offered too rich a menu of workshops and performances for any of us to see all we wanted. This year I was lucky. Several of my favorite Pagan singers (and wonderful people as well) offered back-to-back performances, and I was able to see them all. Ruth Barrett and Holly Tannen  were prominent Pagan minstrels and bards when I first entered our community back in 1984.

    b2ap3_thumbnail_Ruth-serious.jpg b2ap3_thumbnail_Holly-Tannen.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Carol: Gentles in This Hall

 Gentles in this hall,

give ye heed to what we say:

tidings from the East

we bring to you this day.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

For all its liturgical and cultural importance, Samhain has yet to inspire much popular music.

So when we end our big public Samhain ritual by joining hands and announcing, “Let's finish with the Samhain song that everybody knows,” you'll see eyebrows go up all around the circle.

When you first start in, you'll get a nice laugh, and then folks will belt it out like they mean it. After all, what's Samhain for, if not for Old Long Ago?

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