PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Lammas

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
My Children for My Children

If ever I've heard Earth speak, it was in that moment.

Early August: a windy hilltop in western Wisconsin. We've called to her, our beloved Earth of many summers. She stands here in our midst, her hands on the swelling curve of her belly, and her look to us is love.

She cries out. She is in labor now. She crouches in the birth-squat and we dance for her. We labor with her in her birthing, until that final long-drawn cry of triumph. Our circling stills. In the windblown silence, she draws forth from beneath her skirts the newly-born, the god-loaf. We cheer them, him and her.

Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The grain harvest

Lugnasadh, or Lammas, marks the end of the grain harvest, the time for celebration as all the crops are in. Yesterday, I walked in the Cotswolds, and I saw a great many ripe but un-harvested fields. In other years, I’ve seen it all come in well before Lugnasadh, and I’ve also seen the harvest fall much later. In wet summers, the crops can fail, and there is nothing of the grain to celebrate.

For me, this highlights an issue of Pagan disconnection from the Wheel of the Year. We celebrate the grain harvest at Lammas (the name means ‘loaf mass’) but most of us will not have been involved with the harvest, or even have an inkling as to when it happened in our locality. Not all areas are grain growing either. Does it even make sense to celebrate this festival if you live in an upland area that grows sheep, not corn?

...
Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Caity
    Caity says #
    I live in a very warm climate, so there's literal harvesting going on here throughout the year, and I don't think grain is harvest
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Like that, thanks. You articulate an important issue that I like to think about too.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Astrological Lammas Ritual

Within our tradition we celebrate the sabbats as they occur astrologically. This year astrological Lammas will happen on Friday, August 8th when the sun enters 15* Leo. Traditionally Lammas is celebrated as the first of the three neo-pagan harvest festivals with roots driven deep in Irish and Celtic folklore. At 15* Leo we find a fixed star by the name of Dubhe (pronounced DUB-ee) (Bear in Arabic) which is associated with psychic power and destruction. Dubhe is also referred to as “The Eye” or “Pivot of the Universe” and makes up the center of Ursa Major’s spine.For our Lammas ritual we combine both the terrestrial fascination of the first harvest with the celestial alignment of this great star.

 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Time for a Corn Harvest Festival

Lughnasadh is all about the corn, and I am not referring to the effectively creepy Stephen King short story. You simply cannot celebrate without featuring this sweet juicy veggie in some way, shape, or form. Instead of reserving it as an afterthought or side dish, place it front and center and celebrate it! There are many local and small-town corn festivals that you can attend. That way everything is ready-made and ready-to-go. One of the oldest in Wisconsin makes its home in Sun Prairie. According to their Chamber of Commerce website, its humble origins date all the way back to 1953. I do have fond memories of munching the delectable cobs as a youngster there. You could douse them to your heart's content from salt shakers hanging from the tops of tents. The Sun Prairie Sweet Corn Festival has now extended to four days and serves some 100,000 corn enthusiasts. There is a craft fair, parade, tractor pull, music, contests, and all the corn your can eat. Make a road trip of it with your favorite corny companions, and spend the day in farm country. Even if you don't plan to attend them all, it's fun to peruse the different websites. You can view pictures of people dressed as scarecrows and enjoying the harvest activities offered in each locale. 

The Corn/Grain Moon will be making an appearance on Sunday the 10th, and this is indeed an ancient food honored by Aztec and American Indians. To get you in the mood, I have a healthy recipe to sample, since it is a Lammas classic combo of bread and corn:

...
Last modified on
PaganNewsBeagle Magical Monday July 21

We're adding a new feature to the PaganNewsBeagle -- Magical Monday will feature stories, spells, rituals, and practical tips to start out your workweek. Nothing but positive vibes on Monday!

Looking forward to the High Summer Holiday of Lammas/Lughnasad? Here's a "really ridiculous" ritual from Patheos that sounds like fun!

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

     How do I know I am living my life consciously? This question came to me as I stood at my kitchen counter preparing a morning cup of tea, gazing out at the neighbor's immense apple tree. I pondered it as I sipped my tea. How do I know? I realized I know when I'm not, and that seemed like as good a place as any to begin exploring this new question.

     When I am not living consciously, because I'm too caught up in everything going on and trying too hard to get things done that I fail to actually pay attention to what I'm doing, everything is just harder, and takes so much more work: plants begin dying, dishes pile up, the living room becomes a landmass of toys, laundry baskets, library books and shoes. This is not meant to be an essay on housekeeping, nor a meditation on homecaring as a metaphor for caring for the self--I'll leave that to Sarah Ban Breathnach. However, these factors are indicative of how consciously I am living my life. I am a mother and wife; a homemaker as much as a writer; I am a Pagan and Kitchen Witch. I write in between loads of dishes and supervising my four year old's writing lessons. I plot blog updates while popovers bake and then drive my seventeen year old to drumline rehearsal. Many, if not most of the people reading this have similar routines. I don't think my day-to-day reality is any more difficult than others'; indeed, it may be easier. I'm not rushing out of my house each morning to drop my youngest off at daycare, going to spend six to eight (or ten, or twelve!) hours at work, then collecting three children from various locations to come home and cook, clean and supervise homework. I used to. (I am not, however, implying that we stay-at-home parents do not work hard. I am reminded of this every evening around six o'clock when, having finished making dinner, I walk into the living room that my four year old has spent the previous half an hour demolishing, and my two teenagers have given up on their homework because I wasn't there to answer questions.)

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Home is Where the Harvest is

As you know, I have been travelling. I was in Britain for three weeks, returned home for five days and then set off for New York for almost a week.

All of this at harvest time. Sadness. The grapes were neglected and went to feed the possums and raccoons. There was a huge elderberry harvest but I did very little of it. Because we have two apple trees that bear fruit at different times, the apple harvest has been prolonged.  We filled our little freezer with apples destined for the cider fermenter and there are more in the refrigerator in the vegetable drawers.

...
Last modified on

Additional information