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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in runes

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Birch: The Tree of Midsummer

 

 

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Asatru FAQ: Thorsson's Rune Magic Books?

Frequently Asked Question: What's your opinion of Stephen Flowers / Edred Thorsson and his rune magic books?

My answer:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Futhork Song

 Just like the Witch kids used to chant.

 

Fee, Ox, Thurse, Ose

Ride, Keen, Gift, Win

 

Hail, Need, Ice, Year

Yew, Pear, Elk, Sol

 

Tew, Birch, Horse, Man

Lake, Ing, Ethel, Day

 

Lo, I have kennëd my futhork:

is this not a worthy work?

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Asatru FAQ: How Do I Design a Runic Tattoo?

Frequently Asked Question: I want to translate or tranliterate a phrase into runes. How do I do that and how do I make sure it's right?

My answer: There are some decisions to be made: 

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Last modified on
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Did Odin Hang from Yggdrasil?

It's a truism of modern mythography that Odin, Lord of the Runes, hanged himself from the branches of Yggdrasil, the old Norse Tree of Life.

But did he?

According to the famous passage from Hávamál:

I know that I hung

on the windy meiðr

all nine nights:

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Teach Us Those Runes

 Geriht us þat geruni.

“Teach us those runes.”

(Old Saxon Heliand, circa 850)

 

Writing is a magical act.

The old North Sea ancestors had two words meaning “write.”

One was to scribe. That meant “to write with pen and ink,” as the Romans did. This was the newfangled way to write, with a newfangled Latin name.

But the old word, the ancestral word, was to write. This originally meant “to carve.” The first writing that the ancestors knew was the carving ("risting") of runes into wood.

Note which method they favored.

In our hyper-literate society, in which most of us write with light rather than with ink or with lead, we tend to take writing for granted.

We shouldn't.

Last modified on

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