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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in witch

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
What is Hedge Witchcraft?

So what is hedge witchcraft? Hedge witchcraft is often seen today as a solitary pursuit, crafting one’s life in a magical way that reflects the talents and abilities of the practitioner. The term hedge witch was coined by the author Rae Beth in her book, Hedge Witch: A Guide to Solitary Witchcraft (1992). She took the term “hedge” from “hedge priest”, one who preached from the hedgerow, and who had no physical place for a congregation. A renegade, a solitary, a priest who didn’t follow the rules. This still appeals to many today, myself included.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    You're most welcome
  • Lynn Hixson
    Lynn Hixson says #
    I really enjoyed this article. Thank you!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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  • Morgen
    Morgen says #
    I'm a Prachett fan and this sounds great! Adding to the To Read list, thanks

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
13 Things That I Love About Witches

Gods, I love witches.

I love that some of us have seen fit to hex our embarrassment of a president.

I love that some of us have seen fit to hex our embarrassment of a president publicly.

I love that some of us disapprove of hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we fight about hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that no one questions whether or not it's possible to hex our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we care enough either to hex our embarrassment of a president, or to disapprove of hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we fight.

I love that we care.

I love that though, 100 years ago, there effectively was no Younger Witchery, we now number—worldwide—in the millions.

I love that we know how to fly.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Amazing, what you can find on the internet.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I like the picture you included with this.
Chinese Harvest Festival: Moons & Mooncakes

I am very fortunate to be marrying into a Chinese family so I have been learning about the traditions. Coming up this week is the official celebration of the Harvest Moon. In China, the full or Harvest Moon in October is celebrated with mooncakes, which are offered to the Goddess Chang-O, the Lady in the Moon. This is the time when wheat and rice are harvested, making it an important time of thanksgiving for food to have on hand through the winter season.

The rice and the wheat are baked into cakes that look like the big round moon up in the sky and are used as offerings, along with melons and pomegranates, to the goddess. The women making the mooncakes put their intentions into them by whispering secret wishes into the batter. The unifying action of blending and mixing the tasty cakes represents family harmony. One sweet aspect of this ritual is the selection of a young girl to enter the “heavenly garden.” At the ritual feast for the goddess of the Harvest Moon, this young lady becomes the prophet of her family and community, and she is urged to share her visions about the coming year and the prosperity of the village or the land. Feasting on mooncakes and other ritual foods is followed by games and singing under the bright light of Chang-O’s moon. Here is a traditional wish for the season

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

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The term witch’s ladder has a few meanings, but here I use it to designate a spell made by tying knots in a length of cord. Various items, such as feathers and beads, might be tucked into the knots.

 

It occurred to me that perhaps a witch’s ladder could be made not by making knots and inserting items into them, but by spinning a cord—actually creating a cord using the ancient art of spinning fibers together—while spinning into the fibers a length of strong thread onto which beads had been strung. 

 

After all, there must’ve been a time in history when a witch’s ladder was not necessarily made by tying knots in a cord, but by actually creating a cord using the ancient art of spinning fibers together. That seems inevitable, given the magic inherent in spinning.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Title: Ghost's Sight (Witch's Apprentice Book One)

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Sacred Summertime: Outdoor Altars

Outdoor altars are usually of a temporary nature and are all the more lovely for it. The beach is a wonderful place to set up a one-day altar on driftwood with seaweed and shells. There, unless the beach is too crowded, you can commune with the water deities and seek your deepest reaches of spirit. Forest, farm, and meadow offer earth and sky and the sanctity of our mother earth upon which to build your altar. As you do so, reflect upon your connection to the ancients, We follow in their footsteps.

 

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