PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in ritual

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Of the following rituals, which would you rather attend?

a) Main Ritual or b) The Passion of the Harvest.

c) Beltane Ritual or d) The Marriage of Earth and Sky.

e) Men's Ritual or f) Men's Ritual: The Wild Hunt.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My friend Stephanie, who's in advertising, always tells me, "A good ad is about one thing." The same could be said of ritual. Havi
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Right you are Steven. Giving a title to the ritual helps those who prepare and lead it as well as those who attend.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How to Pour a Proper Libation

I always say that you can't pour a proper libation if you're afraid of splashing your shoes.

It was Sparky T. Rabbit's Memorial. I had waded into the Mississippi up to my waist to release the death-ship with its garlanded standing picture, the flowers, the grave-gifts and the bowls of barley, ash, and ocher. As I pushed the ship out to catch the current, from the shore our friend Sirius poured out the grave-libation into the River. Because it was behind me, I couldn't see the libation being poured, but I could hear the voice of it as the wine kissed the water. I knew that Sirius was pouring out a full bottle of wine, but the pour just went on and on and on. I could have sworn that that bottle held three times the usual amount of wine.

And that's the right way to pour a libation.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • john stitely
    john stitely says #
    Steve , you often have excellent advice on authentic ritual and pracitce. Your contribution on How to Pour a Libation” was no exc
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks, John; a good, clear analysis as always. When I spoke of libations as "waste" I was thinking of how it must seem to an outs
  • Gwion Raven
    Gwion Raven says #
    Steven - I love this post! My grandmother makes a great show of pouring the tea from her big brown teapot from a great height. On
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Back when I was a wine waiter, we did exactly the same kind of pour for exactly the same reasons. The Wielder of the Brown Pot (a
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    "'Sustained' pour" is the perfect description. Thanks!

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

There has been so much talk lately of peace. The world is not an easy place right now, and I see difficulties all around, from the level of geographical turmoil to communities in chaos, to quieter, more internal distress. And I see friends, well-intentioned and hard-working people, left bereft of direction, unsure of what to do in the face of it all.

We are all part of something. Family, tribe, online and in person, we have those we love and who love us in turn. We try to reach out, to help where we can, but it can be very difficult, as the connections become loose. Understanding can be lost as beliefs differ, opinions clash, cultures seem confusing. There is never just one side to a story.

I often say that I do my best, because that's all I (or any of us) can do. And I mean it, even if some days, my best doesn't seem like very much at all! But as a Druid and a Pagan, I feel the connection with those around - both human and non-human. My hilltop home, but also the pull of the lands of my childhood (varied though they were) and welcoming places that I've visited, both across the UK and overseas. So many lives, so many stories. How many do we touch, as we walk our paths? What effect do we have on the tides of this world?

b2ap3_thumbnail_20140601_065945050_iOS.jpg

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Warning: This post contains ideas and images that some readers may find offensive.

Talk about cultural poverty. Talk about premature canonization. Talk about unworthy traditions.

The so-called "Sacred Hunt" ritual has become a standard fixture at several Midwest pagan gatherings over the course of the last 10 years or so. Me, I hate this so-called "ritual." Personally, I would contend that, in fact, it is neither sacred, a hunt, nor even a ritual. I think it's time and high time that we drove a spear through its heart and let it die a well-deserved and long-overdue death.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Which opinions you are entirely entitled to, Drake. Everyone experiences every ritual differently. I have not myself participate
  • Drake Spaeth
    Drake Spaeth says #
    Actually he is pretty clearly attacking the Sacred Hunt per se, and not getting at much else in my opinion. Ritual at it best can
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Setting aside the issue of the Sacred Hunt per se, what I see Steven getting at is the appalling emphasis on self-indulgence that
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I participated in this ritual in 2006, and count it as one of the most profound religious experiences of my life. In the 25+ year
  • Drake Spaeth
    Drake Spaeth says #
    Even though Mr. Posch apparently feels like he has made some sort of groundbreaking achievement by expressing his opinion about th

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Sparky T. Rabbit
Sparky T. Rabbit
Peter B. Soderberg
Bruner Soderberg
Heathenbear
3 February 1954 – 2 June 2014
 
Back in 1982, if memory serves, I attended the first CoG MerryMeet festival held outside of California, at Circle Pines in Michigan.  I was a very young Witch (not such a young woman, but a young Witch).  I had only been to two smallish, mainly local Pagan festivals, one being the first MerryMeet in ’81 and the other one in the hot, dry coastal hills of the East Bay.  I had no idea what to expect, but I was excited.  I was there for a reason, as a delegate from my Local Council to conduct the business of CoG.  That fact gave me some assurance of who I was and what I was doing out in the woods with a bunch of unfamiliar Witches.
 
We held our meetings under a pavilion, where I remember shucking Circle Pines-grown corn for the evening meal.
 
Last modified on
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Argr is an all-round abuse word in Old Norse. It implies cowardice, effeminacy, and a willingness to be penetrated. (None of which

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Religion as Sacred performance art

 

My first essays tried to establish two important points about Pagan religion, and to some degree religion in general.  My third ties them together. 

...
Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Yeah, when academia gets involved there are costs as well as benefits, and expanding religious and spiritual terms to encompass th
  • Luan Makes Marks
    Luan Makes Marks says #
    Thanks for your thoughtful response. I have observed the negative feedback on ritual only occasionally, but it exists in the dial
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Thanks Luan- I agree completely. When I first became a Pagan I worried about the 'messiness' of our beliefs. It was when I first
  • Luan Makes Marks
    Luan Makes Marks says #
    Gus, there were so many ways I was moved to respond to this, thanks for that. I used to say that my studies were positioned at the
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    I agree with you about the importance of having a teacher and the skills required. (When I was in grad school I felt every depart
6 Reasons Why The Wheel of the Year is Still Valid

The longer I spend online browsing blogs, lurking in discussion forums and generally talking to other witches and pagans, the more often I see the comment that many people do not celebrate the Wheel of the Year as they have decided the dates as they are traditionally understood in contemporary practice as simply not being a fit any more for their own practice.

...
Last modified on

Additional information