Paganistan: Notes from the Secret Commonwealth

In Which One Midwest Man-in-Black Confers, Converses & Otherwise Hob-Nobs with his Fellow Hob-Men (& -Women) Concerning the Sundry Ways of the Famed but Ill-Starred Tribe of Witches.

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Steven Posch

Steven Posch

Poet, scholar and storyteller Steven Posch was raised in the hardwood forests of western Pennsylvania by white-tailed deer. (That's the story, anyway.) He emigrated to Paganistan in 1979 and by sheer dint of personality has become one of Lake Country's foremost men-in-black. He is current keeper of the Minnesota Ooser.

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The Boy Who Never Complained

A Lost-Found Dobunni Folk-tale

 

There was once a man who, feeling the approach of death, summoned his sons that he might divide his wealth among them.

When all that he owned had been distributed, it was found that he had overlooked his youngest son.

Father, is there nothing for me? asked the boy.

Alas, my son, said the man, There is nothing left but this old copper kettle. But I give it to you with my blessing.

The boy took the kettle without complaint.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Differently Theological

Some would say that the pagan religions are non-theological.

If by this we mean that pagan religions tend not to have 'systematic' theologies, I would agree.

But I prefer to think that we're just differently theological.

Drawing on the word's original meaning (theos, 'a god' + logos, 'word') theologian David Miller defines theology as 'thinking and talking about the gods.' (Miller's 1974 The New Polytheism: Rebirth of the Gods and Goddesses was a pioneering work of contemporary polytheist thought.)

No system required, no seminaries involved. Thinking and talking about the gods.

That's something that pagans do all the time.

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Is It Ethical to 'Terraform' Other Planets?

We sure do have some interesting conversations in my coven.

Is it ethical to terraform another planet?

Terraform vb. (Science fiction) To transform a planet so as to resemble the Earth, especially so that it can support human life.

Although we didn't reach any general conclusion, we did raise some interesting questions along the way.

Does the planet to be terraformed already hold life?

If so, how would terraforming impact said life?

If not, does the planet consent?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks Jamie: your cost-benefit analysis has me entirely convinced (as one heretic to another). For more or less the same reasons
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    I wish you were wrong, but deep down inside I think we're living at the dawn of a dark and terrifying new age. That which is not s
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Being an avid space geek myself (I read NASA Watch and PaganSquare at the same sitting each night), I've also thought
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I remember reading "The Perelandra Garden Workbook" in which the author tries to teach the reader how to communicate with the land
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I like "human gardeners" a lot. Thanks, Anthony. The reference to Perelandra raises in interesting question: are there wights on o

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Follow the Moon

I'm usually no partisan of bumper-sticker theology.

Between the smug (“My Goddess gave birth to your god”), the derivative (“I work for a Norse electrician”), and the just plain delusional (“Nobody ever started a war in the name of Wicca”), I mostly don't see the point.

Until I saw this one. It's poetic. It's evocative.

Profound, even.

A row of nine Moons, waning, full, and waxing. Beneath them:

Follow the Moon.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Hunter's Law

 This is Hunter's Law,

which the Horned

first taught us long ago:

Kill cleanly.

Use everything.

Take what you need,

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Going Viking

The sad, sorry truth is that none of the old ways have come down to us intact.

None of them.

That's why we go viking.

The way of the shaper, who makes the new, is good.

The way of the merchant, who buys and sells, is also good.

But when you can't make for yourself, and there's none to be had by honest means, then betimes needs must set sails.

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X Has Been a Witch for Y Years

X has been a witch for Y years.

Lots of Craft bios begin this way. Apparently we think that it sounds impressive.

It doesn't.

No matter what your Y is, there's always a Y + 10 that would be more impressive. Not to mention Y + 20, or Y + 50.

Y years? Really? Is that all?

Besides, the statement automatically raises the question: So what were you before that?

And then you've already lost your thrust.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Let me add that I'll be remembering your name before the Altar as I make the daily offerings. Good strength, Patricia.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Submerged though it may be, somehow this identity just never goes away. Though we wander, we always come back. I have to think tha
  • Patricia Brown
    Patricia Brown says #
    It is still so nebulous and varied what a witch even is. I was always interested and started experimenting at a young age. I disal

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