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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in jewelry

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Goddess Colors

This is a story about a personal experience I had recently, in which I honored 3 goddesses by wearing colors that represent them. 

Before my recent trip, I had gone to my local Renfaire. Every year I trade something I made for a braid. I started doing that back when I sold my hand dyed fabrics from a booth. Some years I am not vending and some years I am, but I always make something out of my hand dyed fabric or yarn for the braidy lady. This year I was vending my hand dyed scarves as part of the Haven Craft booth. The braid booth has the customers choose ribbon colors, typically 3 colors. This year, I chose lavender to honor Sigyn, rose to honor Freya, and gold to honor Sif. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Katherine
    Katherine says #
    Oh, forgot to tell that I love hand dyed fabric and ribbons!
  • Katherine
    Katherine says #
    Wow! this story remind me of some dreams, when nothing left by the chance - and when you trying to interpret them, you can see an
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Thanks Diane! Yes on actual gold the metal being associated with Freya, but in this case I was associating the golden-tan color wi
  • Dianne Ross
    Dianne Ross says #
    What fine memories you will have of your mother one day. Too thin ribbons of these colours can be braided and used to hold a pen

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Sacred Jewelry for Lodhur

Dedicating jewelry to specific gods or goddesses and wearing it to honor them is something that many heathens and pagans do. Most heathens have a Thorshammer pendant, although for some of us it is not so much for Thor as it is just to identify as heathen. When I want to dedicate something to a god, I usually try to make it myself or repurpose something I already have, to use both less money and fewer of the Earth's resources (green living and frugal living usually run together.) 

Approaching my 2 year anniversary with Odin on June 28th, 2016, I asked my ninefold god-husband what he would like for our anniversary. It was Lodhur who spoke. “Acknowledge me more.”

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Bigghes: or, The Lost Treasure of the Witches

In my previous post about Old English béag, "ring, arm-ring, neck-ring, torc, crown," I was utterly remiss not to have mentioned what is perhaps the word's most obvious link with modern witchcraft.

The fairly obscure Gardnerian term bigghes refers to the High Priestess' parure, i.e. her matched set of jewelry: wristlets, necklace, crown. (Parure. Good old English: we really do have a word for everything. And if we don't, we just pick one up from someone else. Small wonder it's the sacred language of the witches.) The kinship with the Old English word is obvious.

Survival or revival? Wicca being a child of the 20th century, the latter seems indicated here. What it does show is that those early witches were doing their research.

Just as we still do today.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Of Salmon and Arm-Rings

Every word's a story.

Anyone who has ever tried to plow through Beowulf in the original Old English knows the word béag: “ring, circle.” It seems to occur on practically every page, so important was it to Anglo-Saxon culture.

The béag was the most important form of jewelry: not so much a ring for the finger, as an arm-ring, a neck-ring, a torc, a crown. Conferring wealth and status, it was also a basic form of currency. One's lord was preeminently a béag-gifa, a “ring-giver”: the lord as generous giver of gifts to his dright. Think of the Horned Drighten, his antlers hung with neck-rings.

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  • tehomet
    tehomet says #
    There's a town here in Ireland called Leixlip (salmon leap). It was founded by the Vikings a while back.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I love the way that ancestral foods connect us to...well, the ancestors. The land. the sea. And they've all got their own stories.
  • susan
    susan says #
    I read this with some interest being of Swedish ancestry. Gravlax is a prepared salmon often found on a smorasborg. While entertai
Stang-Smith: An Interview with Tveir Hrafnar's Aidan Wachter

The stang as icon has been around the Old Craft neck of the woods for decades (if not centuries) now, but the first (to the best of my knowledge, at any rate) to translate it into jewelry is silversmith Aidan Wachter of Tennessee. As even the most cursory glance at his on-line atelier Tveir Hrafnar (that's “Two Ravens,” for those of you who didn't happen to grow up speaking Old Norse) shows, his jewelry and sigils are characterized by bold, minimalist design and precision detailing.

Aidan, how did you come to silver-smithing?

I lucked into meeting and becoming good friends with symbolic jeweler Mark Defrates when I moved to New Orleans in the early 90’s. At one point he needed help in his shop and that is where I first learned the craft.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks, Aidan. I've made the correction above as well. And just to add: if you think the picture above is beautiful, folks, just
  • Aidan
    Aidan says #
    Hi, this is Aidan Wachter- a friend just pointed out that the link above is broken. The address is: www.tveirhrafnar.com Thank yo

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