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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Paganistan
An Open Letter to the Editor of 'City Pages'

Dear Editor,

This concerning your coverage of Paganicon 2018 (“The Twin Cities—AKA Paganistan—Will Host a World Gathering of Witches”).

In the vocabulary of modern Witches, the word cowan (rhymes with plowin') refers to a non-Witch. It is not necessarily a derogatory term.

Not necessarily.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Young Elders of Paganistan

When you've been doing something for six months, and everyone around you has only been doing it for five, that makes you the elder.

Gods help us all.

That was the situation back in the early days of Paganistan. At the time, most of us hadn't been doing this for very long, but the fact that we'd been doing it longer than anyone else made us the de facto elders of the community.

Incredibly enough, the community survived anyway. It not only survived, but flourished.

You learn fast when you have to. When people around you expect you to be wise, it's surprising how wise you can actually be.

Well, sometimes.

It may well be that you yourself are in this same position: a premature elder in a young community.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
If Pagans Had Religious Police

(Doorbell.)

Good morning, blessed be.

I'm Sergeant Johnny Deer of the PRP, the Paganistani Religious Police. I'm afraid we've had some complaints about this residence.

Yes, I'm afraid it is. Ma'am, it's almost March. You really do need to put the Yule things away. We've got to keep the Wheel turning, ma'am. In this age of Climate Change, we really can't afford to take any chances.

Oh, I understand completely. Believe me, I know all about busy. On this card, you'll find a phone number to call if you need a hand; there's free assistance available from the Commonwealth for the seasonally-challenged. Turning the Wheel is everyone's job, we like to say.

The people across the street? What do you mean?

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In Which Our Intrepid Blogger Has a Big Idea and Makes an Outrageous Proposal to the Twin Cities Pagan Pride Committee

Dear Twin Cities Pagan Pride Committee:

I've got a totally outrageous proposal for you.

Let's kick off Pagan Pride 2018 with an act of public pagan worship at Minneapolis City Hall.

As you are probably aware, the centerpiece of the Minneapolis City Hall is Larkin Mead's monumental 1904 sculpture of the River-god Mississippi: Father of Waters.

Let's get permission to hold a ritual there Friday night.

We can invite Mayor Frey and the city council to join us. The media, of course, will be all over it.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    A warm welcome would await you. I'll certainly keep you posted.
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    I would definitely be on board for this were I nearby. Good luck!
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I've got a letter in to City Hall. We'll soon find out.
  • Mariah Sheehy
    Mariah Sheehy says #
    Awesome idea! Just wondering though, how the church/state laws work for this.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why I Am a Pagan

When we do most of our talking with other pagans, it's easy to get lazy about definitions, especially here in the Broomstick Ghetto.

So when the local Theosophists asked me to address their monthly meeting, it seemed a good opportunity to re-examine and re-articulate what I mostly take for granted when talking with the tribe.

I'd love to see you there. This won't be your mom's Pagan 101, I promise!

Why I Am a Pagan

A talk by Steven Posch

Monday, January 8, 2018, 7-9 p.m.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Would love to see this, if and when you're willing to share, and privately or publicly. In September I spoke to the Sufi Women Or
Church Decides to Return Sacred Boulder to Lakota

In traditional Lakota lore, it is well-known that powerful spirit beings—what some contemporary pagans would call wights—reside in certain large stones.

One such sacred stone—called in Lakota Eyá Shau, “Red Rock”—is located in the town of Newport, about 10 miles south of the city of “St.” Paul, on the grounds of the Newport United Methodist Church.

And thereby hangs a tale.

Red Rock is a granite glacial erratic boulder measuring about 2 x 3 feet, weighing roughly a ton. In this sedimentary landscape of sandstone and limestone, its unusual composition marks it out as mysterious and powerful.

For centuries, traveling Lakota would stop at Red Rock, then located near the banks of the Mississippi, to make offerings and pray; the rock was named for the custom of ruddling the rock with red ocher.

In time-honored Christian tradition, Methodist missionary to the Lakota Benjamin Kavanaugh set up shop beside the Red Rock in 1839. (Religions come and go, but holy places tend to stay the same.) The town that grew up around this mission—later renamed Newport—was in fact originally called Red Rock. In later years, the church that Kavanaugh had founded changed location several times. Interestingly, with each subsequent relocation, they took Red Rock along with them.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Opening Lines

It's still one of the best opening lines that I've ever heard.

A buddy and I had gone over to 'Saint' Paul to check out the new Ethiopian restaurant.

While we were there, I noticed at a nearby table a woman with very intense eyes, giving the waiter a hard time.

Tough customer, I thought.

About halfway through the meal, I looked up to see the tough customer standing at our table. Those intense eyes were on me now.

“I like your pentagram,” she said, then paused. “I have one too.

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