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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in moon

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Thanks Be to the Blood

I love my moon time, I love everything about it. 


Last modified on
The Moon, the Tarot, and is it Really Blue?

January 31 brings us a lunar eclipse in Leo. This is quite an enigma in many ways, for this is also the 2nd full Moon in the first month of this year, as well as being a supermoon. What does all of this mean? Is it really something spectacular? 

Well, yes, and no. Let's break it down. First, the supermoon. This doesn't give the Moon any additional magical powers or make its influence any more strong or mysterious. It's an astronomical term, meaning that the Moon is at its perigee—or less than 223,694 miles from the Earth—at the time that it was either new or full. That's it!

The supermoon isn't going to change the Moon's usual gravitational pull on us. There's not going to be any unnatural weather or otherworldly events because of it. The atmospherics may make it appear a bit larger, but that's also got to do with the angle at which you view the Moon; Moon rise always appears larger. It may or may not appear brighter; again, even if the Moon's brilliance is highlighted, just how much it shines is going to depend on atmospherics and the angle from which it is viewed. 

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Lunar Cycles and Healing

It is no secret that we witches are deeply connected to the cycles of The Moon.  We use lunar cycles to make decisions about planting and tending herbs for healing, food for nourishing our families and communities, and what kind of magic is appropriate to do personally, communally, or politically.


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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    yes, thank you Ted, blessings on your ancestors and all their descendants
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Divine love, compassion and hope to all who suffer, from those whose families have been touched by the same scourge.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Autumnal Moons

As early people developed their society and cultures, they named things in their surroundings including the full moon.  Each month the full moon shows prominently in the night sky and would have drawn the attention, as it still does, to the people in these ancient cultures.  As the year winds down from the growing season, the heat of summer starts to cool, the season turns to autumn with the autumnal equinox where day and night are equal - a time of balancing and completing tasks.  For the early peoples, every day would be busy with harvesting their crops in order to ensure survival through the cold winter months.  For the modern pagan, survival is less an issue but autumn can be a time to finish goals.

As the early people looked up, survival and harvest predominantly occupied their minds.  Naturally they named the full moon after things that were occurring in life like harvest, barley, corn, nut and mulberry.[i]  Depending on the latitude these products are all ripening for harvest during September.  The full moon represents bounty; therefore, naming the full moon after one of the bountiful crops symbolized good crops so the community could flourish.  The Chinese named the moon Chrysanthemum partly because the flower blooms during this month but also because this was one of the herbs they used. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Summer Moons

From ancient times, humanity has named its surroundings.  Was this to create a connection, feel more in control or just a way to identify what could be at times an unfriendly environment?  We probably will never know for certain but one of the things we do have are remnants of their naming like the full moon names.  These names give us a hint into how ancient peoples identified with their surroundings and tracked their seasons.

For early agricultural communities, June began a slow trickle of early crops like strawberries.  Imagine going all winter with little to no fresh fruits or vegetables.  Perhaps the community even ran low enough on food that hunger was a part of daily life.  Then to work all spring to get crops in the ground so next winter you hoped not to fall short.  Then June comes and the creamy flowers of strawberry plants indicates soon the first red berries will be there.  Imagine how much sweeter these taste after struggling for enough food.  Naturally as this important fresh food became available, the people would logically name the full moon strawberry. This name comes from both Celtic and Algonquin lineage so perhaps it was a staple and a pleasure for both groups.  Was it because it was one of the first crops or because the flowers of this plant are the same milky white color as the moon?  Probably we will never know. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Sun Cup, Moon Cup

You stand before the Sun.

He is tall and shining, golden.

In his hands, he holds a golden cup.

He offers, and you take, the burning vessel.

You meet his eyes.

You drink his fiery liquor.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
It's the Full Moon, Charlie Brown


With his hands on his head, Charlie Brown groaned.

"Isn't there anyone who knows what witchcraft is all about?"

In the silence that followed, it was Linus that spoke.

"Sure, Charlie Brown. I can tell you what witchcraft is all about."

He walked to the center of the stage. "Lights, please?"

The lights in the auditorium dimmed. From the spotlight's magic circle, he spoke.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mab Nahash
    Mab Nahash says #
    Don't you think it's awfully reductionist to conflate gods with gendered approaches to magic?
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    You really don't believe in asking the small questions, do you? For now, let me say that I think we'll find much to say on the que
  • Chris Moore
    Chris Moore says #
    Compare the magic of the Moon to that of the Horns?

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