Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Charter: A Carmen Figuratum

 

St. Mark's Cathedral, Minneapolis.

Looking up from the hymnal,

I see him, sitting

cross-legged on the altar:

buck naked

(oh baby!),

antlers out to here,

grinning like a jack o' lantern.

I blink, and he is gone.

I stand there, thunder-struck;

though he spoke no words,

my heart is riven, riven through.

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Habitual Libators: A Mystery of 'Old Europe' Solved? (or, Why Archeology Needs More Pagans)

Admittedly, it's one of the lesser mysteries of the Copper Age Central European cultures that archeologist (and feminist ideologue) Marija Gimbutas called “Old European,” but no less intriguing for all that.

What the heck is the “binocular” vessel: two conjoined, mirror image ceramic vessels, lacking—interestingly—both tops and bottoms.

Well, nobody knows, and chances are that we never will know. Still, so-called "binocular" vessels are not an uncommon find at Old European sites, so clearly they had a cultural function of some sort, if only a symbolic one.

But I'll tell you what I think.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Seer, What Do You Want?

Hey, I'm a storyteller. Ask me a question, and I'll tell you a story.

My students keep telling me: Posch, you can never die.

Well, thanks, I accept the compliment. I've been around the maypole more than a few times, I'm good at what I do, and I know my stuff.

But I keep thinking about the poor seer who, when granted a boon by the gods, made the mistake of asking for eternal life. Unfortunately for her, they granted her request.

Alas, not even the wisest can see all ends.

Eternal life without eternal youth: who would want it?

Down the long years, she just got older and older, but she could never die. Eventually, she shriveled up like a cricket. Finally they hung her in a jug from the ceiling, and the little shits from the local village would come to the temple to taunt her.

“Seer, what do you want?” they would ask. “Seer, what do you want?”

Her answer was always the same.

“I just want to die,” she'd tell them.

So when they ask me (not entirely jestingly), How could we ever replace you? here's the story that I tell.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Ivy Leads Us into the Dark of the Year

Following the wheel of the year through the Celtic tree calendar, September 30th begins the time of ivy and its ogham character Gort. Ivy teaches us about strength and endurance, death and immortality. It is a symbol of the knowledge of things that are hidden and mysterious. This is a time (from September 30 to October 27) to enter the darkness within and explore our most meaningful inner truths.

Ivy is associated with the Goddess because it grows in a spiral. Ivy symbolizes the spiritual journey through the wheel of the year: in winter we follow the spiral of energy down and within, and in the spring, we follow it back up into the light for our own symbolic rebirth.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Ye Gods!

“Ye gods!” I hear myself say. “That's terrible!”

A neighbor had been telling me about a stabbing that had just taken place on the block. Such is life in urban America.

What she thought of my involuntary expostulation, I don't know. Probably nothing. If it registered at all, she probably thought I was just being precious.

But I wasn't, really. “Ye gods” has become my oath-of-choice.

The nice thing about “Ye gods” is that—unlike most pagan oaths—it's remained in current English usage for the past 400 years or so, so it doesn't have the “trying too hard” quality that mars modern pagan oaths of the “By Thor's hairy balls!” variety.

How that came to be so makes an interesting story. Back in Shakespeare's time, new anti-blasphemy legislation made it legally punishable to use the name of the Christian god(s) on stage. Playwrights responded by using the names of pagan gods instead. (That's when “by Jove!” entered the English lexicon.) Ah, the good old Renaissance: when the old paganisms saved Christian Europe from itself.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, When I'm around my friends, I'll usually say, "Gods!" When I'm alone and confronting some greater or lesser unpleasan
Five Good Reasons to Live in Pagan Minneapolis

“One would think you lived in Minneapolis.”

(Christopher Isherwood, to the residents of Berlin on their sang-froid following the division of their city in 1945)

 

Ah, fair City of Lakes: scrappy little Minneapolis, small town on steroids.

Minneapolis, where the winters are too cold and the summers too hot.

Minneapolis, where we have laws against everything.

Minneapolis, which routinely pays world-class architects first-rate money for second- (and third-) class work.

Why would anyone live here?

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Libra New Moon: Saying Goodbye to Social Media

It's Autumn and things are slowing down in Nature as am I. I let go of social media this month after a visit home to Ontario, Canada where I let the deep lake water wash over me as I floated, floated, floated. Watched the beavers and the otter play, and the blue heron and loon swim and fly and utter their gorgeous (the loon) and weird (heron) songs.

During my time away I realized that whenever I shared anything on my phone or on the internet it felt like WORK, a huge amount of work. Posting/sharing/chatting/responding to everything and everyone on Facebook Instagram, texts, emails. So I shut it all down. I stopped looking at it (except when sales came thru, of course). I honestly felt like a hollow shell; I had nothing left to give.

So now, I give you this, just this. That's all. It will be enough. I feel myself going back in time to BEFORE; before the internet was on my phone and the incessant, undending chatter took precedence. I have myself back.

I want our time together to be magic, a respite. So mote it be.

In that spirit I share with you my latest painting from the Faerieality Series. May she delight you in sparkly, unseen, magickal, trixsy ways. That is all. Just enjoy.

Sparkly Blessings!
Kathy Crabbe

About Birch Fairy

"Birch Fairy", 6x6 inches, acrylic gouache and collage on paper mounted to board.

"Like many fairies, the birch fairy can open the portals to the subtle realms. The birch is associated with cleansing and freshness, and the goddess Arianrhod is invoked using birch, to attract fertility and aid creativity." (The Fairy Bible by Teresa Moorey)

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