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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Feminism

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

ansuz

Mouth is the chieftain / of all speech, / the mainstay of wisdom / and a comfort to the wise ones, / for every noble warrior / hope and happiness.- Anglo-Saxon Rune Poem

This is not going to be a rune primer, but it is relevant to what I want to talk about today, which is speech and silence. Once upon a time, when I was studying runes, Odin went out of His way to tell me that Ansuz was a signifier rune for me, much in the way that a court card can be in the Tarot. At the time that He said this to me, I assumed it was because I’m a writer, or perhaps because Loki wants me to talk about Him publicly. And some of that is true; some of it is tied up in apotheosis, and some in personal work. Trigger Warning: Frank Discussion of Rape

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Another Girl's Paradise

I live in Paradise. Or at least, some people’s version of Paradise. I’m also a long-time Tori Amos fan, as I’m sure some of you gentle readers have already divined by the amount of her work on my blog. I love her for many reasons, among them that she’s unapologetic about her spirituality, her beauty, and her sexuality. And like me, she is also a rape survivor. In many ways, that in particular fascinates me because she seems less hindered by her assault than I am in terms of being willing or able to express desire. I had a lover ask me once what I wanted, and I was at a loss to express anything in particular, in no small part because asking for it seems Dangerous with a capital D.

And I’m not the only One aware of this problem – recently, Loki specifically asked me to tell Him what I wanted. Again, I don’t know. I’m always happy to try things, but I don’t ask or initiate, because I’ve been shamed into not wanting to express any sort of desire. Again, asking for it is, well, asking for it. Given the fact that I write romance, I’m sure that sound strange, but in essence, it’s Not Me enough to be Another Girl’s Paradise, and I can enjoy it, express myself.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    I so relate to this! I've never heard this song (I mostly listen to filk and old folk music) but I find myself nodding at all thes
  • Julie Landa
    Julie Landa says #
    I, too, am a huge Tori fan and have a difficult time asking for what I want. Thanks for the reminder that I can, and the inspiring

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
La Llorona

      I want to be La Llorona for Halloween, I told my grandmother after watching a Mexican movie.           

      Sacrilege, Abuela said, she is a murderess!

       At eight, I was used to my grandmother's threats when I misbehaved: La Llorona will take you away.

       The myth of La Llorona conjures up strange effects on Latinos.  Most children scream after hearing her name.  Many women cross themselves, saying "Ave Purisima," after mentioning her name.  And yet, some women—like my grandmother—smile after summoning La Llorona. The Weeping Woman did not scare me; instead, she fascinated me.  I suspected that La Llorona had a secret. Perhaps, if I dressed like her I could uncover her mystery.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Thanks Jan, for reminding us of this lovely version of the Llorona's legend . Clarissa Pinkola Estes has beautifully reclaimed ma
  • Jan Johnson
    Jan Johnson says #
    In Clarissa Pinkola Estes' (Dr. E) book "Women Who Run With the Wolves", there is another version that is similar to the one will
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Comas, Thanks for sharing! Your post reminds of one of my favorite William Faulkner quotes: "The past is never dead. It's no
  • Lillian Comas
    Lillian Comas says #
    Hi Jamie: Thank you for your comment. Indeed, Faulkner was right: the past is not even past.
Sometimes Healing Energy Is Not Enough: Michael Brown, Civil Unrest and Our Ugly Present

Please note that this is a sensitive topic and needs to be discussed with care. Please reference my guidelines for sensitive topic discussion.

 

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Fiery Tuesday News & Opinion

Here at the Pagan News Beagle, I've decided to have themes for each day of the week, based on my version of the Five Elements. (Air, Fire, Water, Earth, and Spirit.) Plus, a "Science for Pagans" feed for the weekend. It keeps things interesting for me in organizing what stories to share. Hopefully it will be interesting for you, too!

Tuesday -- whose name comes from the Norse god Tiuw, often also related to the Roman god Mars -- I'm dedicating to the Element of Fire, and articles related to activism, politics, and passion. 

Here's today's Fiery stories:

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The #HobbyLobby Supreme Court case today is complex, and its import for Pagans not clear. Court tried to rule narrowly, but left open many important issues for further decisions.

Clear winners: family-owned businesses (even corporations that are not publicly-traded) that have religious objections to various mandated public policies, organizations and people opposed to certain kinds of contraception and to abortion. Pro-life groups rejoice, as well as employers of all sizes and types. (Can "religious exemptions" apply outside of contraception? Unclear.)

Clear losers: female employees of said family-owned businesses who want contraceptive services covered under their employer-paid health care. (Though this will be somewhat dealt with by the Obama administration plans to cover such care itself, similar to exemption given to religious non-profits such as the Catholic church.) Opponents of "corporate personhood" gnash their teeth.


Up in the air: how far will the "religious exemption" go for family businesses?

Links to more coverage: http://www.religionlink.com/source-guides/religious-freedom/


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Twenty Years Later #YesAllWomen

I'm going to preface this with a trigger warning for discussion of rape and self-harm. I don't want anyone reading this to be triggered, but I am going to talk about the high cost of rape culture, and its lingering effects.

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