Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Little Samhain in Every Bealtaine

Posch, you pervert.

May Eve is days away, and you're writing about Samhain?

What are you trying to do, wreck us?

Au contraire. (And let me point out that our Southside friends and family are preparing for Samhain as I write this).

It's just that this new (to me) idea is so elegant, so true, that it simply won't wait.

I'm just now back from a warlocks' work weekend at Witch Country's Sweetwood sanctuary. We're building a shrine there in the woods below the circle.

This time around we began site preparation, and removed the standing stone that will be the centerpiece of the shrine, from its immemorial bed in the coulee (ravine) wall. The Bull Stone has now begun its long journey across the coulee and up the side of the hill.

But that's another story for another day. (Stay tuned.) In the process, we chopped down a number of young trees, both to clear the site and to provide us with rails and rollers.

You can't move a 1000-pound stone through the forest without doing some damage. Iacchus, Sweetwood's priest-in-residence and caretaker, remarked offhandedly that it's the custom there to offer at Samhain on behalf of all the lives that one has taken during the course of the year.

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[The Rules of Exile] Rule No. 1: Glamour Isn't Optional, It's Survival.

When I was a nanny, one of the mothers I worked for was easily one of the most beautiful women I had ever met in my life.  It didn't matter what was going on with S., she always had it together.  Her make up was on point, her wardrobe was beautiful and to make it completely unbearable she was also one of the kindest women I had ever known.  Perfectly perfect in every way, as N. would say.  S. had two very small children, she had a career and a social life.

I'm not suggesting that S. was most women.  Obviously, she had some help in her glam squad and her domestic posse, which isn't something most of us have access to.  I worked for other women too with small children and while less blessed than S. (though also as sweet to work for, I was v. blessed as a nanny), also really were on point.  They were career women and would click off to work in their heels, their hair done, their lipstick on and get it done.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Last Day of Winter

My husband Aaron died on February 25, after a long hospitalization, and even longer illness.

The shock has not fully worn off. And the grief will be present, for who knows how long. This is all to be expected. But throughout the sorrow and dislocation of this loss, it’s the movement of the Great Wheel that has been part of my support, my comfort, and ultimately my acceptance of my grief.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    I am so very sorry for your loss.
  • Leni Hester
    Leni Hester says #
    Thanks Thesseli.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
SEA OTTER: Second Chances

When people think “otter”, they often imagine Sea Otter with her cute face, floating on her back, holding a clam. The most aquatic of Otters, Sea Otter spends most of her life at sea. Since She likes to be in the water near the shore, Sea Otter prefers living along coasts instead of the open ocean. During rough weather, Sea Otter will seek shelter in a rocky cove.

Unlike other Otters, Sea Otter will catch fish in her clawed forefeet. Other times, She dives to the sea bottom, snatches a tasty clam, and returns to the surface. Swimming on her back, Sea Otter uses a rock and bangs open the clam on her chest. She eats crabs, being careful not to get her nose pinched.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Great Rite-athon

A beloved community elder had fallen gravely ill and was in need of healing.

Word went around that on such-and-so a day, at such-and-so a time, people should cast their circles and make love within them to this end.

And so it was.

“I love this religion,” said one.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Sorry James, sometimes my love of stylistic terseness results in the cryptic, especially with a high-context post like this one. I
  • James Bulls
    James Bulls says #
    Ha! Well, thanks for the response - that's certainly illuminating. See you around!
  • James Bulls
    James Bulls says #
    I don't get it - is there an essay here? I can't find anything more than: --------------------------------------- A community elde

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Blood Sabbat

I have seen him stretch out his naked limbs on the altar.

I have seen.

I have seen the flash of blades descending.

I have cried out.

I have anointed my brow with his blood.

I have mourned with the others.

I have eaten the red bread and drunk the red drink.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Horned Green Men: A Colloquy

So, Posch.

You say that the Horned and the Green Man are not one god, but two: the Divine Twins, Master of Beasts and Master of Plants respectively.

You also say that in our day They reveal Themselves through art.

So what about all those Horned Green Men that we see?

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