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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Soul Walker

It's the morning of the Eve of Oimelc. I sit on the front porch with our youngest coven kid, waiting for the school bus.

As we wait, we sing songs of spring.

Walker in the silent places,

Walker where no one may go,

our aloneness cries out to you,

Walker in the Snow.

The Arctic cold that has paralyzed the city for days has finally broken. There's even a little moisture in the air. A dusting of snow has fallen overnight; the snow diamonds sparkle.

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Spirit is Everywhere: Capricorn Moon Vibes Jan. 31-Feb.3

Capricorn Moon Spirit Animal: Racoon

Keyword: Friendly
Meaning: A good friend and a warm hug are needed..
Reversed: Being alone builds character but can also be lonely.

“Heart-Bandit (Racoon)“
from The Elfin Ally Oracle Deck

by Kathy Crabbe

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

A time of magic and transformation, sacred to the goddess Brighid, is upon us at the eve of Imbolc,  Lá Fhéile Bríde  as it is known in Irish and Là Fhèill Brìghde as it is known in Scottish Gaelic. Brighid is one of our oldest and most revered of goddesses, Britain and Brittany are both named after Her, she is the sacred guardian of these countries. Her special festival, Imbolc, is one of the oldest Celtic festivals- one of the most famous sacred sites in Ireland, the mound of the hostages at Tara, built around 3350BC is astronomically aligned to the Imbolc sunrise, and there are several others, showing us that this time has been sacred for thousands of years. Thought to mean ‘in the belly’ Imbolc is a time when the ewes are pregnant and the new lambs are born, and when the year ahead is still pregnant with possibility.

There is something so special about this quiet, wintery time, when the first new shoots may be breaking through the soil but winter still continues fierce for a while yet. Today I woke at dawn to frosty world of white and silver, and I cleaned the hearth and kindled the fire in Brighid's name, adapting a traditional Celtic kindling prayer from the Outer-Hebrides.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Imbolc As the Cailleach Leaves

...and Brighid prepares to arrive in her Maiden rainment. In Ireland I always marvel at how the old tales still mimic weather wisdom.  The saying goes the Cailleach goes and gathers firewood on Imbolc for the rest of the winter. If the weather is sunny it means that she needs to stock up for more cold. But if there is precipitation then it will set fare and she needs not re-stock. Of course, the old people round where I live now used to say "A fair February crushes the rest of the year!" But old bachelor farmers are not life's optimists. Anyway, this was the way the Hag in the Mountain was extravagently garbed yesterday round my way.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Boleybrack.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How Much Ground Would a Groundhog Hog...

Winter's halfway over. In my book, that means: holiday.

Whatever you call it.

Imbolc (various spellings).What, you didn't grow up speaking Irish?

Despite what you've heard, Imbolc probably doesn't mean “In the Belly” (which, when you think about it, is a pretty stupid name for a holiday anyway). What does it mean then?

Nobody knows. Possibly it's a pre-Keltic name. Anyway, it's exotic (pagans like that) and really, really old.

Oimelc (various spellings). What, you didn't grow up speaking Scots Gaelic?

Despite what you've heard, Oimelc probably doesn't mean “Ewe's Milk.” Yes, it's lambing time, and yes, our much-diminished larders are (gratefully) being replenished by a welcome freshet of new milk right now. But “Ewe's Milk” is probably best regarded as folk etymology.

What does it mean then?

Nobody knows. Possibly it's a pre-Keltic name. Anyway, it's exotic (pagans like that) and really, really old.

Candlemas. This is how they name the holiday in Cowan. (That telltale -mas on the end gives it away every time.) Some Old Craft purists, who wouldn't be caught dead using a neo-peg name like Imbolc or Oimelc, still call it this: a habit of protective coloration left over from the Bad Old Days, I guess.

Well, la-de-da-da.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Around here we tend to present the children to the Master at Grand Sabbat. Just like the witch-hunters said we did. "Suffer the
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Presentation at a temple huh. Okay, so the pagan version of Groundhog day would be presenting children 11 and under to the gods,
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    I like this. Magic is not complicated. Ritual doesn't need to be either. Name it what you want, and just celebrate. Life is short
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    What exactly is Candlemas supposed to be about? It sounds like someone is blessing candles. Chapter 4 of "Christianity the origi
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My understanding (I'm certainly no expert on the various Christianities) is that "Candlemas" is an English folk-name for the feast

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_thornbound.jpg

Title: Thornbound (The Harwood Spellbook Volume II)

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Yoshitoshi_Nihon-ryakushi_Susanoo-no-mikoto.jpg

 

 

Susano-O no Mikoto

God of storms and sea

Brave and Swift

Volatile and Impetuous

Impulsive and Kind

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