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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Ritual Recipes: Kitchen Table Cures

There is not denying we live in a time of immense tension. So many of us are living under enormous stress and strain. But, come to think of it, so were our grandparents and relatives who lived through World Wars. The Great Depression and really hard times. For that reason, some of the homemade healing potions, teas and cures our grandmothers cooked up from the kitchen cabinet are the best things to turn to in tough times. Here are some lovingly passed down from Auntie. Many remedies can be made from what you have in the kitchen, from spices as well as plants. These kitchen table cures will offer you and your family much relief from stress and strain.  Here are a few simple tried and tested recipes:

 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Sumbel at Las Vegas Pagan Pride Day 2018

Last Saturday, Prudence Priest and I conducted an Asatru sumbel ritual at Las Vegas Pagan Pride Day 2018, at the Unitarian Universalist Church. I acted as gythia (priestess, aka gydhja) and Prudence acted as valkyrie (mead woman.) We were in the workshop space, rather than the speaker space, because sumbel is an audience participation ritual where everyone makes a toast. Our ritual was packed, and went very well.

Before beginning the ritual, while waiting for all participants to assemble, I explained the Heathen Visibility Project (see my post with that title) and let participants know where to sit or stand if they wished to be in the photos or to not be in the photos. More photos of this event are available on my Facebook, Twitter, and DeviantArt pages.

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An Introduction to Creating an Element-based Spirituality

No faith, no magical practice, and no school of philosophy has the monopoly on elemental belief. From Aboriginal animism to Druidism to Shinto to Plato, “the Elements” have played a huge role in how humans have related to and deified the natural world around them.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    My hardcover copy of Runequest Roleplaying in Glorantha arrived today. Every character in the game; not just the players, is alig
Peaceful Prosperity Now! So Mote It Be!

For me, prospering financially, emotionally, and spiritually requires fully engaging in life, not backing off from whatever’s occurring. Being human, I readily forsake the moment, but if I move into the now on a somewhat consistent basis, abundance comes, accompanied by serenity. One of my blocks to being in the moment is finding glory in self-pity. I try to avoid it, even when things are at their worst, because self-pity makes my defeat more likely. For example, when we thought I had only months to live, trying to avoid self-pity and instead committing to the moment and being of service to it allowed triumph; now I have another 20 years in me.

 

I want to feel my life is of epic proportion. However, I don’t want to create that feeling by constantly dwelling on my problems, making them grow in my mind, so that I view myself to be an abandoned, struggling hero. 

 

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What Makes Midwestern Paganism Different?

Over the course of our decades-long friendship, writer and activist Macha Nightmare has remarked to me on more than one occasion that paganism here in the Midwest has a more distinctively “regional” feel to it than in most other places.

(Macha, please correct me if I'm misquoting.)

Macha has traveled more widely than I have across the many-colored world of Pagandom, but—from what I've seen—my own experience tends to bear out her observation.

So one New Moon the coven sat down to discuss the matter.

What makes Midwestern Paganism different? Here's what we came up with.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Part of my intent with this piece (it's a poor writer that needs to speak of intent, but so be it) was to poke some gentle fun at
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    I can get on board with that. Steven was also.pointing out, politely, the good things.about Paganistan. Theres plenty about oursel
  • Mark Green
    Mark Green says #
    OK, fair enough. I think it's tricky, parsing pride of place vs. thinking our place is "better" than some other place. Because for
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Tony Kelly of the Pagan Movement in Britain and Ireland always used to say that "Mabh [=Earth] is nowhere more beautiful than wher
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    It was intending to be a joke, Mark... We all are part of.communities that are.regionally unique, tho - customs, history, food, st
Hedge Witch Medicine: Nettle Tea

After a week like we all just experienced, boost your mood and immune system with herbs.  Nettle (Urtica dioica) Nettle has been used as a healer for untold centuries and relieves allergies, is an immune booster and can even help with a distended prostate. It is also a superfood and beloved for the nutrients. If you are working with fresh nettles, wear gloves to avoid the stinging. Cooking or drying removes any irritant. Any herb or health food store will have dried nettle or capsule form. Make nettle tea by steeping 2 teaspoons of leaves for ten minutes or take the capsules in recommended doses of 300 to 500 mg twice a day. Nettles are a hedgewitch's favorite and you'll soon see why. Take good care of yourself!

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

So the snows have come, with the oats yet to harvest.  A month still before Samhain, but the Wheel seems to be turning early.  My forearms are covered with tiny scratches from the straw, as I pound the oat sheaves into the darkness of their threshing casket.  I had hoped for another few weeks of mellow fall weather before the winter sets in, but often the actual seasons of life don't match the liturgical calendar of feasts and fasts, worship and work, as the moons wax and wane.  

That's ok.  It used to bother me a bit, but after a half-decade now of living off grid on our old-fashioned farm, I have come to enjoy the reflections which are born in the tension between the symbolic and the real.  What does it mean that the snowflakes are falling in Lammas-tide?  Is it a sign that I've taken my ease for too long, putting off until tomorrow what should have been done yesterday?  Is it a gentle reminder that the sabbath eschaton of the dark-half of the year is often prefigured, even pre-echoed, in the waning of the light-half?  That the root-tip of the yin is buried within the full-flower of the yang?  As I harvest our years' worth of oatmeal, sown in the spring with yesteryear's corn-queen, these and many more oracular hints occur to me.

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