PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
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[Today, we sit down for a quick interview with Australian author, Warwick Hill. A follower of Fjorn Sid, Hill discusses how his spirituality influences his writing; his medieval novel, Pagan Child; and his upcoming projects.]  
 

BookMusings: How would you describe your personal spiritual path? Are you eclectic or part of a particular tradition?

 

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Imbolc New Moon Ritual

Five years ago an Englishwoman, a Scottish woman and an American-Irish woman travelled together to Galway to attend the Spreading Brigit's Cloak conference at Brigit's Garden.  My friends Morag and Jo, and I had a memorable weekend celebrating the Feast of Brigit together with many other woman from across the globe. In the intervening years we have not always been able to celebrate together, but this year we all had day time available on Imbolc New Moon day, 4th February. So we three, the self-styled Cailleach Coven, met again at Imbolc.

At that conference we encountered the Crios Bríd and it's ritual. If you have ever read Seamus Heaney's poem "Brigid's Girdle", you will begin to understand. It is the belt of the goddess (or saint). I had seen one made once before, with the man trying to facsimilate the traditional way of weaving a straw rope with a hand sickle. It was tricky and it looked like a recipe for injury. At the Brigit's Garden conference there was a much more health and safety version one made from yarn. 

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Every Spell Works Two Ways: In Which Our Coven Casts Its Very First Hex

We started by turning off every light in the house.

Every coven worth its wood* has a story to tell about its first hex.

Here's ours.

The group had been together for not quite a year when we decided to move in together. The next nine months were some of the most difficult—and also some of the most gratifying—of my life. Much of what we've been doing together ever since was first gestated during those nine fateful months.

One cold day in January I got a call at work. There'd been a break-in.

That night was Hex Night.

First we went through the house and turned off every light.

Then, in the dark temple, we pounded out a slowly mounting cacophony of rage.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    for a good hex, you require only two things: Great need, and powerful intent. Well done.
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Great, as always. Love to Prodea.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Celebrating the snow

I’m no great fan of snow, I admit. It’s one of the things to celebrate where my first port of call is to absolutely hold up your right not to celebrate. For many of us, snow is hard work. Snow days can make getting to work a nightmare, and missed work isn’t fun if you can’t afford it.  Ice means isolation. Slippery surfaces mean real risk of injury. Cold weather kills people – usually the old and frail who cannot afford to heat their homes, and those who have no homes and are rough sleeping. Being able to enjoy the snow is a sign of privilege, and any celebration of it has to include recognition of that. It is not ok to shame or harass anyone who doesn’t enjoy it.

There is one particularly magical aspect of snow that is often overlooked by people who go out to play in it – and that’s footprints. Snow reveals who else has passed through, and if you can be out before human feet have obliterated all signs, snow can tell you stories about who was there and what they did.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Karmadillo

The story of the karmadillo could be a parable, except that it's true. It perfectly illustrates the concepts of wyrd and orlog.

Wyrd is basically the law of cause and effect. Orlog is the layers of past action that affect current action. Past actions that affected this situation include someone in the man's society inventing a firearm, the firearm company selling firearms, the man buying one-- which implies all the past actions from the man's ancestors moving to America to the man getting a job which paid him enough to buy the home where this happened and have enough money left to buy a gun and ammunition for it-- and on the other side of the equation, all the many actions of nature that resulted in the evolution of an animal with a bulletproof armor hide.

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'Snowdrop, Snowdrop': A Magical Little Children's Song for Imbolc

As its alternate name, Candlemas Bells, would suggest, the snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis, "milk-flower of the snows") is the floral signature of the festival of Imbolc.

Check out 'Snowdrop, Snowdrop,' a charming (and magical) little song by the prolific and thoroughly unpretentious writer of children's songs, Dany Rosevear. Of such humble fieldstones is the temple of modern pagan culture built.

Of course, I've been unable to resist tampering with the lyrics.

Just a little.

 

Snowdrop, Snowdrop

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    "Snow bells." Thanks for the link!
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    You're welcome!
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    I remember a Schumann song called 'Schneegloeckchen,' sung here by the lovely Edith Wiens: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOsXVX

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