PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

It's been a while since I've posted on here, mainly because I've been working on my new book about Hedgewitchcraft, out in October 2022! While I get back into the swing of writing here on this channel, I'd like to share a video with you that I made this month, about the liminal places, which are so important to the art of hedge riding. x

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 How Throwing Rice Became a Wedding Tradition | Martha Stewart

Some Thoughts on an Old Wedding Custom

 

The Received Tradition knows three rites of grain-throwing, and each is implicated in the others.

Grain-Throw the First: the actual Sowing of Seed.

The symbolism of this gesture, both practical and ritual, needs little explication, beyond the observation that virtually every agricultural society sees sexual symbolism here.

Grain-Throw the Second: showering the newly-married with Barley.

Barley is the oldest cultivated grain known to humanity: we've been raising it for maybe 12,000 years, since the end of the last Ice Age. Though it would be impossible to prove, it's my guess that we've been tossing it at newlyweds since the end of the last Ice Age, as well. The symbolism of this playful, immemorial act can hardly be lost on anyone. Speaking as a (naturalized) Midwesterner, you've really got to love the custom's implied micro-aggression as well.

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The Birth of Astrogemology

The ancient art and science of astrology conjoined with crystals comes down to us from 6,000 years ago, when the Sumerians, denizens of the cradle of civilization in Mesopotamia, began marking the metaphysical meanings of the map of the stars. Their neighbors in Ur, the Chaldeans, took this a step further when they observed certain affinities between precious gems and star seasons. At the time, their interests were primarily bounteous crops, bounteous babies, and less plentiful enemies. But the canny Chaldeans were great record-keepers, and they noticed that these recurring pattern tracked with the sky chart of the year. Their greatest minds—scholar-scientists, mathematicians, and philosophers—co-created what would become the very dense and deeply meaningful pursuit of astrology. Once they got going, they could predict the future, as evidenced by the great biblical story of Jesus Christ’s birth and the three kings—astrologers all. Six thousand years ago, learned men were at once priests, doctors, seers, astronomers, and teachers. These special men were also gemologists, cutting, polishing, and, most importantly, studying the gems, rocks, and crystals of their earthly domain. They knew which stone should accompany the dead to the underworld, which rocks portended good fortune if placed over doorways, and what crystals offered benefits to the body.

The ancient Sumerians had enormous knowledge, for example, about the Dog Star, properly referred to as Sirius A. They knew the density of the star the length of its orbit (fifty years), and since Sirius A was the brightest star in the night sky, they connected it to the beautiful blue stone they considered to be both powerful and precious—lapis lazuli. They devised a system for assigning colors to the planets, and these associations became the basis for their gem theories:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 Flame - Wikipedia

 

I spoke recently with a friend's young daughter concerning the well-known phenomenon of the Witch Eye. Like many of us, she's got one, too.

The stories all agree that we only get one Witch Eye each. Why only one? The answer is not far to seek.

A witch has one Witch Eye, not two, because you have to be able to see into both worlds: both this world, and the other. Otherwise, you couldn't function in both. Even witches need to take care of practical matters, too.

“What if we had two?” I ask her, posing a hypothetical that I've long wondered about.

Not missing a beat, she tells me. (12 going on 347.) Her response takes me between the eyes.

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Introduction to Birthstones and Astrogemology

Birthstones are very special stones that have traditionally been correlated with every month of the year. Hallmark didn’t invent the concept of birthstones, however; it came from the Bible! In Exodus chapters 28 and 39, there is much discussion about a burnished and stone-set breastplate of the High Priest of the Hebrews. Here is the biblical description of the breastplate: 

And he made the breastplate, artistically woven like the workmanship of the ephod, of gold, blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and of fine woven linen. They made the breastplate square by doubling it; a span was its length and a span its width when doubled. And they set in it four rows of stones: a row with a sardius, a topaz, and an emerald was the first row; the second row, a turquoise, a sapphire, and a diamond; the third row, a jacinth, an agate, and an amethyst; the fourth row, a beryl, an onyx, and a jasper. They were enclosed in settings of gold in their mountings. There were twelve stones according to the names of the sons of Israel: according to their names, engraved like a signet, each one with its own name according to the twelve tribes. (NKJV, Exod. 39:8-14) 

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

"When she arrived at her building, she noticed a beam of silvery light shining down on the front stoop. Even after all those years, the moon still knew where she lived."

--Elizabeth A. Gould (The Well of Truth)

The Well of Truth is a creative synthesis of novel with metaphor plus myth, allegory, symbolism, and archetypal experiences of truth. I’ve never read another book quite like it—it blends the fictional story of a woman’s life with larger mythical understanding and lessons and reads more like a “teaching” than like strictly fiction.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Molly, The book sounds really cool!
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    It was quite interesting!

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Coins for the Dead

I’ve begun training as a cremationist, and while it can feel overwhelming at times when faced with all the things I have to learn, I really enjoy it. I like how hands-on it is, and how the steps in the process utilize different skills and actions. Cremation is a deeply spiritual act to me. I physically care for the dead and participate in their transformation, assisting the Fire in releasing their spirits from their physical forms.

 

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