PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Crystals and Pets - Followup

This blog post is a response I gave to a Crystal Friend who wanted to know about her cat and its reaction to some of her crystals.

If you are curious about crystals and pets, this is a followup to that original blog post (here is a link) on the topic of crystals and pets. Read on for the question and response.

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Pick A Card for the Scorpio Full Moon: REVEAL is within (Secret Solace)

Not knowing what to write about this month for the Scorpio Full Moon I pulled a Lefty Oracle card that advised me to simply write and open my heart. These words popped out: lush...paradise...awaits. Be prepared...to fight.

I was at my relatives this past Sunday and was brought very low by the suffering around me; of death imminent, and of pain, well hidden beneath various attitudes of flippancy, 'fidgetiness' and criticality. I broke down, almost not making it through lunch. I couldn't open my heart. I could barely breathe.

Later, the next day during my coaching session with Jen DeTracey I cried many times (quietly) and I recognized how anger and the fight within me keep me going and pursuing my dreams. And so, I continue to make a sacred and safe space around me with the help of art.

Can anger be healthy?
Yes...
If you understand how it works, let it out and then use it to propel you to make a difference.

“Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.”

Scorpio Full Moon: Pick a Card
Relax.
Focus gently on your breath.
Go within.
Ask a question or leave it open.
Scroll down for this month's Full Moon Reading.

*cards are from the lefty oracle and elfin ally oracle decks*

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American May Song

Called the “father of American music,” Pittsburgh-born songwriter Stephen Foster (1826-1864) wrote more than 200 popular songs, including such classics as Camptown Races, Way Down Upon the Swanee River, and Jeannie with the Light Brown Hair.

Sharing both a name and a hometown with him, I grew up with Foster's music: I sang his songs at school, and on road-trips with my parents and grandparents. I learned to play the piano from a book of his music.

Much of Foster's repertoire sang of life in the Old South, which makes it an uncomfortable fit today. Much of it, frankly, makes for difficult listening. To his credit, one must at least acknowledge that, in his songs, Foster again and again sympathetically depicts the humanity, dignity and deep sorrow of the enslaved.

In The Merry, Merry Month of May we see Foster in age looking back nostalgically at his youth. It's not his best song, but it is, nonetheless, an American May song.

And you gotta love that “May/gay” thing.

 

The Merry, Merry Month of May

(published by Daughaday & Hammond, Philadelphia, 1862)

 

We roamed the fields and river-sides

when we were young and gay;

we chased the bees and plucked the flowers,

in the merry, merry month of May.

 

Oh yes, with ever-changing sport

we whiled the hours away;

the skies were bright, our hearts were light

in the merry, merry month of May.

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Thunder Likes Guys

 Reader alert: Sexual content

 

What is it about gay sex and thunderstorms?

Daniel and I had been having a particularly athletic bout one afternoon when, just at climax, there came a bone-rattling clap of thunder, and the rain suddenly began to roar down.

“We did that,” Daniel said, chin-pointing outside.

Son of unbelief that I am, it was hard to doubt that he was right.

I was reminded of this experience recently when I heard a similar tale from a friend.

Ask any gay guy. Among the brothers, there's pretty much unspoken agreement that experience suggests some sort of connection between the two.

Now, why it should be gay sex and thunderstorms, as distinguished from non-gay sex and thunderstorms, I couldn't tell you, not having had much experience when it comes to the latter myself. (Call me homonormative; see if I care.) Certainly, as a local Wiccan priest who is himself gay has observed, with male-male sex there are more likely to be, shall we say, liquids flying around. So maybe it's a matter of sympathetic magic.

Thunder, of course, is well-known to be the most virile of gods, voracious of appetite when it comes to food and liquor, women and men. Statistically we can say that eight out of ten people struck by lightning in the US are men. Make of that what you will.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    This may sound odd but in areas where flooding is not a seasonal thing that happens every year I believe that the flood is an act
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    One wonders about floods. "Hey boys, better ease off for a while"? Hah. Good luck with that one.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I've been hearing about drought in the American Southwest for it seems like a decade now, and I read a Time magazine article about

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Do Witches Throw Rice at Weddings?

Do witches throw rice at weddings?

Seriously? You are actually asking me if witches throw rice at weddings?

For gods' sakes. What kind of cowanish question is that?

Of course we don't throw rice at weddings.

(“Do witches throw rice at weddings?" Ye gods.)

Cowans throw rice at weddings.

When it comes to weddings, witches don't hold with anything so newfangled as rice.

Witches hold to the Old Ways.

What's the oldest grain? Barley. Barley, which, in the dawning of days, the Mother gave to our people to be our food forever.

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