PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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This May I was blessed to be asked to teach at a wonderful event at Dunderry Park in County Meath in Ireland. 'Animystics' was a two day event that wove together various Celtic traditions and earth based practices to really deepen our connection to the earth and our own souls. My session was all about connecting with tree spirits, and the tradition of the Bile, or sacred tree, clan totem and representative of the world tree in the Celtic Traditions. Standing there, in a field on a beautiful May morning, I was struck again by how such simple acts as breathing and being present to nature can restore our balance, and by extension our connection to our own sovereignty, our own souls, and the soul of the earth Herself. Dunderry is just a few miles from the hill of Tara, said to be the ancient seat of the semi- mythical high kings of Ireland, and I felt the ancient ancestors, with their passionate love of the land reach out to us, to remember, and honour Her again as a way to restore ourselves in these often troubled times.

Tara is such a special place, a wide green hill that overlooks a vast and verdant landscape. On a clear day it is said you can see all of Ireland from it's summit. Once an Iron Age hill fort, it is also home to a Neolithic burial mound, 'the mound of the hostages', granting access to the womb of the earth, the realm of the sidhe, and the Lia Fáil, or Stone of Destiny, said to have been brought from the otherworldly city of Falias by the Tuatha de Danann, the Irish gods. The Lia Fáil is said to cry out when the rightful king stands upon it. Once it stood beside the mound, but now it stands sentry a little further off, overlooking the wide plains below. Whether this solitary monolith was truly the ancient mythical stone will always be up for debate, but standing there touching its weathered grey sides, sensing the endless generations that have come here, and used this as the touchstone, the still and central point to anchor their spiritual and earthly selves together, to find that link to sovereignty in a world that tries to take so much soul and so much power from us, is always a healing and humbling moment.

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The Wayward Daughter

Dion Fortune was wrong.

Not all goddesses are one goddess.

There's Earth, Mother of all Life. She and her family—Sun, Thunder, Fire, the Winds, the plants, the animals—live out our lives together. Her story—our story—is what we call the Wheel of the Year.

And then there's the Moon.

Moon is the wayward daughter, the child who goes off and has a life of her own.

She has her own cycles, but they're not synched with those of everyone else. She has her own changes, powerful and independent. She's still Earth's daughter, part of the great family of the gods, and part of the life of that family, but very much on her own terms.

There in her sky (L. M. Boston) she wheels, independent of Earth's cycles, wandering the horizon in her Great Cycle as she will: ours but always her own.

That's why we worship her.

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  • Anna
    Anna says #
    Thanks for this story. It will stay with me.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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b2ap3_thumbnail_fire-in-cauldron.jpgA life truly lived
burns away what is no longer relevant
gradually reveals our essence
until, at last, we are strong enough 
to stand in our naked truth

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Imagine me shaking my fist at both Mars and Neptune. Thanks for the heads-up.
  • Tony Lima
    Tony Lima says #
    Great, yet a find a grain of salt in my observations due to how some humans delve in the Third Person, and also because it maybe a

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Magic Flower

 Hurray, hurray, the First of May:

outdoor f**king begins today.

 

To “May” or “go Maying” means to go out into the woods to gather the flowers and greenery that will adorn the May celebrations.

Yeah, right.

And Midsummer's Eve is the only night of the year when the magical fern flower blooms, conferring upon the finder health, riches, and the ability to understand the speech of birds and animals. In the North it's longstanding custom for the young to go out together to seek this wonder.

Or so they say.

Through much of human history, winter was the time when you were shut into the house cheek-by-jowl with much of your extended family and (depending on when and where), maybe the cow and the horse, too. Private it wasn't.

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, June 2

Geneticists and physicians consider the mutability of the gender binary. An ancient beer recipe is uncovered in China. And the writer of the hit sci-fi book The Martian talks about priorities for human space travel. It's Earthy Thursday, our weekly segment on science and Earth-related news! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Using the Craft on Behalf of Children

Sometimes the most obvious uses for magic and the craft don't occur to us until someone else points them out.  Take me, for example. I've been writing this blog for a couple of years now, and yet it took an Internet meme to point out what I could be doing to help my children by using simple aspects of the craft.

Given my frequent forgetfulness at all of the spiritual healing tools available to me when one us falls ill or gets a minor injury (e.g. scrapes, bruises, et al), maybe it shouldn't be such a surprise.  Sure, I grab the bandages or dit da jow, but Reiki or shielding? Totally forgotten.  After all, I keep track of thousands of mundane objects and events across a given week, it's hard in the day-to-day to recall the deeper lessons from the past.

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