PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Traditional lore can inform, gently point to mysteries, and outright open gateways. But, nowadays, in the Pagan community, rigid interpretation of lore often becomes a stranglehold on magical and spiritual practices.

 

I’ve spent years learning lore, meditating on it so it can inform shamanic lessons I give, and creating ritual based in lore. So I’d be the first to insist that, sometimes, lore provides definitive, irrefutable facts. However, common sense is needed.  

 

My mother taught me to think for myself. It was one of the greatest gifts a parent can give. 

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Judith Shaw
    Judith Shaw says #
    Very well put. Dogma is the death of spirituality. Our spiritual practices seem to be best served if we remain open to growth an
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Judith, thanks so much! I *really* appreciate your support re my essay.
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Tasha, thank you so much for your kind words. I’m so glad you relate to what I’m saying. Bright blessings back at you!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What you said in this well written piece is right on in my book. Thank you for putting it so well. There are many masks worn by th
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    I feel you on this. I have a (tentative, I'm still very new and learning) relationship with Death as an entity, usually presenting
One Advantage of Hosting the Ritual...

...is that you get all the leftovers.

My festive First-Day-of-Spring breakfast:

  • Steamed asparagus
  • Toasted sesame egg bread
  • Fresh farmer's cheese with garden chives
  • Ostara eggs with hot sauce
  • Fresh strawberries
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_1941_Aveling_Barford_Steam_Roller.jpg

Water and Fire are the predominant Elements in the month ahead. They’ll be creating a lot of steam, which will be driving an engine of practical matters, business, and government. Emotions and tempers will be hanging out very near the surface. Fortunately, empathy and intuitive insights will also be strengthened — we’ll have need of them, as interpersonal relationships are likely to be a bit strained.

...
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Rites of Spring: German Easter Traditions

Osterfeuer in Rugen, Wikimedia Commons

While the word Easter has long been used to denote the Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Christ, I see no problem also using it to refer to the pagan holiday celebrating the return of spring. Aside from the secular aspects of contemporary Easter traditions that are less focused on resurrection and salvation and more on fertility – eggs, rabbits, chicks, etc. – the very word Easter is pre-Christian in origin (the original Christian holiday name is the Hebrew Paschal).

...
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Spring Equinox, Minoan harvest, and upside-down calendars

I live in the northern hemisphere, specifically in the southeastern US, and here it's Spring Equinox today. But in the southern hemisphere it's Autumn Equinox. And even more confusingly, in the Mediterranean, even though we still call it the Spring Equinox, it's harvest time, so in Modern Minoan Paganism we acknowledge the harvest festival on this day. Before you go reaching for the aspirin to quell your headache, allow me to explain...

The ancient Minoans lived on the island of Crete, just south of Greece in the eastern Mediterranean. That region has a unique climate that can be confusing for those of us who are used to spring-summer-autumn-winter. But it's important to understand the Mediterranean seasons so we can have a clue about how the Minoans experienced their world.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Who Are the New Pagan Heroes?

Some people have saints. Pagans have heroes.

But you don't have to slay dragons to become one.

To the ancestors, heroes (the term is gender-neutral) were those who had done such outstanding things that they deserved to be remembered for them.

You found a city, you're a hero. You teach the People something important that makes their life better, you're a hero.

Who are our modern pagan heroes? Well, they differ from group to group. Some would number Gerald Gardner among them. Doreen Valiente, Robert Graves, Robert Cochrane: they weren't perfect people, they weren't gods.

But they each did something remarkable, something that we, their inheritors, have benefited from, and therefore they deserve to be remembered.

The Kalasha of NW Pakistan are the only surviving Indo-European people who have practiced their ancient religion uninterruptedly since antiquity. In their valleys, there's an altar to the hero who taught the People to make cheese.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    [Chortles.] So, how's about a libation, already?!
  • Keith Ward
    Keith Ward says #
    Always! ‘Ave Maestro!’
  • Keith Ward
    Keith Ward says #
    You’re my hero!
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I love this story. I happen to be one of those people who enjoy cheese. I think a festival in honor of the cheese hero is a grea

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Update on My Wandering Uterus

It is almost a year after the initial conversation that sparked the crazy idea to write a collection of women's stories and call it "My Wandering Uterus" (for more details on that journey, please reference Byron Ballard's blog here: http://www.myvillagewitch.com/my-wandering-uterus/)

As I'm putting together a presentation on the history of the theory of trauma, the irony of this is not lost on me. Men like Jean Martin Charcot and Pierre Janet were some of the first men in their field to turn the tide against the asinine diagnosis of hysteria; recognizing that the manifestation of trauma based symptoms were not physiological in nature, but psychological, and not limited to the uterus. The article that inspired this conversation can be read here: https://lithub.com/hysteria-witches-and-the-wandering-uterus-a-brief-history/

...
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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    Thanks so much for being part of this exciting project!

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