PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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The Cartoon That I'd Draw, If I Could Draw

Jainism is India's religion of ahimsa (non-harming) par excellence; in fact, it's probably from Jain (that's Jine, not Jane) practice that both Hinduism and Buddhism got their commitment to non-violence and vegetarianism. Jainism is so committed to non-harm that, as with Catharism, it's considered meritorious to starve oneself to death, since to eat necessarily deprives others of life.

(Known as sallekhana, this would seem a pretty harmful act to me—self-harming is still harm, yes?—but, hey, I'm no Jain. In my opinion, the Dharmic religions parted company from their natal paganisms when they became world-denying.)

So deeply rooted is Jain reverence for the sanctity of non-human life that some Jain monks wear face masks constantly, even when they're not wearing anything else (and Jainism is also where Wicca got the term skyclad from), lest they inadvertently inhale some flying insect and so take life.

All this by way of prelude. So, in this Covid-19 Era—you can see where this is going—here's the cartoon that I would draw, if I could draw.

Gods, I love high-context humor.

 

Street scene, with wall-posters detailing covid protocols, and people wearing facial masks.

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Witch Craft: Sun Infused-Flower Essences

For centuries, flower essences have been used to heal many infirmities (see list below).  While the health food shop versions are handy, they are also very spendy. You can make your own flower essences at home. Start by making a mother tincture– the most concentrated form of the essence – which can then be used to make stock bottles. The stock bottles are used to make dosage bottles for the most diluted form of the essence, which is the one you actually take.

What you will need to make a sun-infused essence:

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The MMP Pantheon Series: The Full List

Modern Minoan Paganism is a revivalist tradition of modern Pagans in relationship with the Minoan deities from ancient Crete. Our pantheon is a crowded one, and it can take some time to explore the different deities. With that in mind, I'm writing a series that explores each god and goddess and where we can find their symbology in Minoan art.

You can find our full pantheon hereHere are the posts in this pantheon series:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Putting the 'Bare Ass' in Embarrass

“The roofers are coming tomorrow,” my housemate tells me one evening. “You might want to spend the day out; it's going to be noisy.”

I thank him for the heads up and continue getting ready for bed.

Next morning, I get up early. I climb out of bed, stretch, and open the blind.

On the roof immediately outside the window, his eye caught by the movement, stands one of the roofers, looking in.

Meanwhile, I'm standing there butt-naked, scratching my nuts. Shades of Life of Brian. I'm not sure which of us is the more surprised, or embarrassed.

Oh well. If you're going to do something, do it gracefully.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I saw that movie. I vividly remember the scene your referring too.
Nature as Classroom for Healers: Herbal Cures

Centuries ago, healers were the wise women of the village, the healers and midwives who could halt a fever with a poultice or hasten the setting of bones by concocting medicinal tea. The lore of growing and gathering healing herbs has been passed down for hundreds of years. A learned healer knows which phases of the moon are best for planting seeds, how to plan your garden by the stars, and how to create spells for health and harmony. In the grand tradition, I learned at the knee of my aunt Edith, a very wise woman who would take me for walks through the woods and show me the uses and meanings of every flower, weed, and tree. From her, I learned that lovely Queen Anne’s lace is, in fact, wild carrot; that pokeberries make the finest blood-red inks; and which meadow greens and shade-loving mushrooms are safe for a noonday salad. I was in awe during our tromps through the woods, walking mule upon mile to map every acre and spy every specimen.

 Nature was our cathedral, our classroom, and our calendar. Every spring, we could mark April I by the blossoming of a solitary clump of delicate Dutchman’s breeches amid a raft of rarest wildflowers. I thought Aunt Edith was teaching me about plants and trees, only to discover years later that she had shown me the sanctity of life and passed on a legacy I now treasure and pass on to you.

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A Walpurgisnacht/May Day Vigil Ritual Menu

As we collectively shelter in place to slow the advance of the novel coronavirus COVID-19, the world and the Wheel continue to turn. Spring is rolling around into summer (at least, in many places in the Northern Hemisphere), and we have come to that major pillar of the annual celebrations of many Pagans, May Day or Beltane, and the night before, which is known by many as Walpurgisnacht.

While we may not be able to conduct the usual festivities, we can still observe this Sabbath in all its richness while sheltering in place.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Language of Serpents

In the dream, the whole coven is over for New Moon. We're discussing the writings of occultist Dion Fortune: in particular, a passage in which she writes that, after disincarnation, she will return as a golden serpent. We discuss whether or not this could actually be so.

It so happens that the long-time partner of one of us, a magician who sometimes attends our rituals, is himself conversant in the Language of Serpents.

As one, we turn toward the temple's snake-hole. (Since the days of Knossos, every good temple has had a snake-hole.) In the Language of Serpents, with his arms extended and palms turned down, M— delivers the invocation.

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