PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts
Naturalism, Monism, and the Philosophy of Atheopaganism

Atheopaganism is a naturalistic religion: that is, we believe that all that exists is a part of the natural, material Universe, and is subject to its laws. We revere this material Universe—the Cosmos—as Sacred and magnificent.

As naturalistic Pagans, we do not subscribe to the idea that there is an Otherworld within which reside magical and/or disembodied entities such as gods, spirits, ghosts or fairies. We expect scientifically credible evidence in order to support a proposed idea with our belief, and there simply is none for this Otherworld and its supposed residents.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Rosmerta, The Great Provider

 

Rosmerta, a goddess loved by both Celtic and Roman Gauls, was known as the Great Provider. A goddess of fertility and wealth, she was worshiped in southwestern Britain, Gaul, and along the Rhone and the Rhine rivers.  Sheis a good goddess to remember and to honor during the harvest season. 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
John Barleycorn & the Ale Wives

There's an Old English riddle from the Exeter Book that is part of a long tradition about the abuses of alcohol through the ages. While there is much to celebrate in the joy of drinking, there is a dark side, too, that many have fallen prey to over the years. The poem goes like this:

Biþ foldan dæl     fægre gegierwed
mid þy heardestan      mid þy scearpestan
 mid þy grymmestan     gumena ge streona ·
corfen sworfen     cyrred þyrred
bunden wunden     blæced wæced
frætwed geatwed     feorran læded
to durum dryhta     dream bið iinnan
cwicra wihta     clengeð lengeð
þara þe ær lifgende     longe hwile
wilna bruceð      no wið spriceð
 þōn æfter deaþe     deman onginneð
meldan mislice     micel is to hycganne
wisfæstum menn     hwæt seo wiht sy.

...
Last modified on
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    Very interesting. Thank you!
Mindfulness Massage: Healing Relaxation Rub

Nothing is more relaxing than a massage and it is so good for you- healing and energizing, to be sure.Massage bars should be look, smell and feel yummy, lush and soothing to the skin. Cocoa butter is beloved for the delicious chocolate sweet scent. I also recommend shea butter, grapeseed oil or mango butter as other options for they are also delightfully sumptuous.

 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-shot-2018-08-22-at-7.37.38-PM.pngWow, a beautiful, and sad, film narrated by Yuwali, an indigenous Australian. Her story starts at the age of 17 and now at 62 she recalls her life with insight, drama and great descriptions of what she was thinking when she saw her first ever white man and motor vehicle.
 
The story is the voice of this woman, an elder from the oldest culture on the planet - the insights into their relationship with the land, each other, their stories and the dingo's is fascinating. How wonderful they were able to live as they have always done even although their country had been colonized for 200 years. Yet sadly, the white man caught up with them, completely misunderstood them - tied them up and carted them off to camps.
b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-shot-2018-08-22-at-7.37.53-PM.png
 
What's unique about this film is hearing it from Yuwali's perspective, in her native tongue as she and her family see some of the original footage taken of them all those years ago.
 b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-shot-2018-08-22-at-7.38.10-PM.png
 

 

 

 

 
Last modified on
Why Black Phillip Eats the Lion from the Lion's Den

Every decade has its premier witch movie, and that of the twenty-teens (so far, anyway) is surely Robert Egger's 2015 The VVitch: A New-England Tale, in my opinion the finest filmic invocation of the Horned Master since Roman Polanski's 1999 The Ninth Gate.

So there are two recommendation for your next coven film night.

In The VVitch, young Jonas and Mercy sing a song with an eerie three-note tune about Black Phillip, their family's ornery he-goat and (as it later turns out) something more.

Black Phlllip, Black Phillip,

a crown grows out of his head.

Black Phillip, Black Phillip

to nanny queen is wed.

Jump to the fence post,

run to the stall:

Black Phillip, Black Phillip,

king of all.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Praise of Cackling

Zombies shamble. Werewolves howl. Witches cackle.

I'm not sure just when witches first began to cackle. Personally, I suspect the cackling witch to be a fairly recent development, perhaps even as late as the “Twentieth” Century. It may even be that we owe our cackling—as with so much else—to the Great Green-Faced Mother of Us All, the immortal St. Margaret Hamilton.

Still, whenever it is that we first began to cackle, we've made the sound our own. You hear “cackle” and you think “witch.” It's pretty delightful to have a verb of one's own.

It was not always thus. “Cackle” is an old word—all the Germanic languages have some version of it—denoting (probably imitatively) the sound made by a hen when she lays an egg.

The ancestors were astute observers of the world around them. If you've ever actually heard a hen cackle, you know what a distinctive sound it is: shrill, brittle, with a note of triumph to it.

The underlying metaphor here, then, is witch : hen. This actually makes a good deal of mythological sense. The sacred bird of the God of Witches is the—well, let me be coy here and say “rooster.” A cock's head figures on the coinage of the Dobunni, the Keltic tribe ancestral to the Anglo-Saxon Hwicce, the original Tribe of Witches. Witches, so they say, are hens to the Devil's cock, cows to the Devil's bull.

Oh, those earthy ancestors.

Last modified on

Additional information