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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Title: The Goddess in America: The Divine Feminine in Context

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why Pagans Do Ritual

It's still the single best rationale for pagan ritual that I've ever heard.

Back in the early days of the Wiccan revival, a reporter asked Gardner's first post-Valiente priestess, Dayonis, "Why do you do your rituals?"

"Because," she told him, "if we didn't, the Sun wouldn't come up in the morning."

Now that's a proper pagan answer.

Aunt Doreen—rather peevishly, one thinks—later dismissed this reply as simple-minded. Well, she knew Dayonis better than I do.

But I still think she missed the point.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Food and Cooking in Minoan Crete

One way to connect with an ancient culture like the Minoans is to learn about their daily life: what they did for a living, what their houses looked like, and especially what they ate. Food is a powerful way to connect with other cultures, and that includes those of the ancient world.

A while back I wrote about how the Minoans cooked - what their kitchens and cookpots were like, how they used braziers or outdoor cookfires instead of hearths. Today I'm going to talk about what they cooked. Most of this information comes from an appendix in my book Labrys and Horns.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Plant Magic in Winter

At this time of year when there’s not much to do in the garden or find in the wild, houseplants become the focus for plant magic.

The spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) has been popular since forever, which is no wonder because it is so easy to care for. This plant gets its name from its spider-like appearance and its spiderettes (babies) that dangle from the mother plant like little spiders on a web. The spiderettes start out as small, white flowers. Once they develop roots, they can be planted to start a whole new colony of spiders. Also known as the ribbon plant, their ribbon-like leaves can be solid green or variegated. In addition to adding a splash of interest to a room, spider plants are good for clearing impurities from indoor air.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Know Your Lake

Let's face it: Revival Paganism has an authenticity problem.

This state of affairs is hardly to be wondered at. Our roots have been cut. Things that should, by rights, have come down to us, we've had to figure out for ourselves. Like every learner, we've made our share of mistakes.

But there's a ready solution.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Foundations of Incense: Frankincense

While sandalwood is arguably the most traditional base material for incense, perhaps no ingredient’s name is better known than frankincense.  Its fame is based on more than just its place in the story of Christ’s birth in the New Testament book of Matthew.  In fact, frankincense plays an important role in ancient history that begins thousands of years before the beginning of the Common Era.  Frankincense was one of the key products shipped on the famed “silk road” of the ancient world.  It was a source of great wealth and, as a result, also a product of mystery and intrigue.  Even today the locations of many of the traditional groves that produce the highest quality frankincense remain a closely guarded family secret.

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A Witch’s Practice of Prayer: Why Not? (Part 3)

Many of my friends and colleagues who identify as Pagan are suspicious of prayer, as I’ve mentioned earlier.

 

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  • Natasha Aiken
    Natasha Aiken says #
    This Witch’s Practice covers an exceptionally straightforward approach to rehearse enchantment and witchcraft without the prerequi

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