PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How Different Are Pagans?

Just how different are we, as pagans, from other people?

For the most part, I'd be inclined to say: Not very.

But sometimes I wonder.

In the introduction to his 2017 Stonehenge: The Story of a Sacred Landscape, British archaeologist Francis Pryor talks about how the compartmentalization of modern life makes it difficult for us to understand how, for the ancestors, religion could imbue every aspect of existence.

Almost nobody in the modern West, he writes, would build or maintain an altar, let alone a chapel, at home. At most, a religious devotee might say prayers before going to bed. And of course the reason for this is that religion in the modern Western world has ceased to be a part of daily life (20).

I actually laughed out loud when I read this. Virtually everyone that I know has at least one home altar. For many of us, the real problem is altar-creep: the tendency of altars to sprout on every horizontal surface in the house.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    I think you are right. I think some form of Pagan spirituality is the natural way we tend to respond to the world and to spirit.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Over the course of the last (nearly) 50 years, I've watched old tribal institutions and ways of doing things reemerge--sometimes a
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Very true in my experience. Some people bemoan the demise of an integral society whereas many NeoPagans are recreating one, on a

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Title: Blood Ghast Blues (Black Box Inc. Volume Two)

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Darrins, Marindas, and Coven-Spouses

The non-witch husband of a witch is, of course, a darrin; everybody knows that.

Call it a Classical reference.

But what do you call a witch or pagan who is partnered with the member of a coven, but is not him- or herself a member of the same coven?

My friend and colleague Magenta Griffith raised this interesting question at a recent Full Moon. Hey, we're a youthful religion, and we're still getting our terminological ducks (so to speak) in a row.

For my coven, this is a particularly pertinent question, since we've got several such folks who regularly attend our holiday events—in some cases, for decades—but who do not themselves “belong” to the coven. (Our unofficial “No couples” policy has served us well over the course of the last 37-going-on-38 years; it's certainly at least one reason why, as a coven, we've managed to last so long.)

Well, taking darrin as a paradigm, are there any examples in the “literature” (I use the term loosely) of one witch married to another who doesn't belong to the same coven?

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I've always liked "consort": I have a fondness for that peculiar group of words in English (there are about 100 or so) that mean o
  • Jan Erickson
    Jan Erickson says #
    I prefer witch's consort... Blessings! Jan

June 27, 2018 – I just read a beautiful prayer by Francesca De Grandis on the Witches and Pagans website. In it, she references the fear of extending one's arm to help another human being – which means, I think, the fear that our intentions may be misinterpreted and that the arm which was extended in love might get viciously ripped off at the shoulder! Her prayer is for strength of faith, to remember that Mother-Father God supports us always, no matter what the outcome seems to be.

This concern is especially rampant in these times of political and religious division, exacerbated by an Internet gone out of control - with so many plausible versions of reality that nobody can tell, any more, what is true and what is false. To an old wannabe hippy like myself who used to live in hopeful dreams of a world united in love, it is unbelievable how the most benign expressions of goodwill and acceptance can be met with the most ferocious hatred and condemnation - by people who consider themselves just as reasonable and educated, and just as socially sensitive and spiritual, as I am myself!

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Before sitting down at my computer this evening I was writing down a note on a story I hope to write. In the note a boy age 10 sa
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Very good observations, Anthony. I like your story line which shows reality from the viewpoints of different ages. And it always

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Unveiled.

Hands down, grief is generally my least favorite emotion.  It’s so big and inescapable and words never express it correctly.  What I didn’t know prior to two weeks ago is that it also protects you.  It’s an anesthetic veil wrapped around your eyes  (and your mouth and ears too for good measure) that prevents you from being bothered by anything that is anything less than urgent matters.  Your grief, your pain is so overwhelming that you are required to be cared for by others because you cannot care for yourself.  You need to be fed, you need to be focused, you need to be loved, you need to be hugged–

You need to be treated like an actual human being.

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The Giant Squid: The Repository of Our Fears

Before the giant squid was officially discovered in 2004, She was known as a sailor’s nightmare. For centuries, mariners whispered of a tentacled horror rising from the deeps. No one knew when a tentacle would suddenly wrap itself around a hapless ship and pull everyone down into the briny darkness.

Before Japanese oceanographers photographed a giant squid, the proof of her existence were shapeless blobs that washed up on beaches. Occasionally, people would find squid beaks in the stomachs of sperm whales. Others did notice the scars on sperm whales, where a giant squid must have grabbed them with hooked tentacles.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Hex-Back

When it comes to hexes, there are two kinds: the nasty, and the really nasty.

Nasty: You should drop dead.

Really nasty: You should live for a long, long, long, long time....

...and be in unbearable pain the whole time.

So: Senate Majority leader “Mitch” McConnell has hexed us all with a stacked Supreme Court for the forseeable future. As hexes go, this is clearly one of the B variety.

Well, one good hex deserves another. To my mind, only one real question still remains.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    On June 19th I woke from a dream telling me to call on the gods of love, friendship and community to guard against trolling. Deit
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    O great: a troll in the White House, and a drow ( = draug, zombi, reanimated corpse) leading the Senate. What next?
  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    While deserving of both A and B, (he would then have to become one of the undead to remain corporeal for a long, long, long time.)

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