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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thirteenth and Stang

Call it unexpected affirmation.

A warlock friend of mine was driving through Ames, Iowa the other day. Amusingly, his route took him along Stange Road.

Locally pronounced stang, Stange (in two syllables) is originally a Norwegian surname; in this case, presumably the name of some City Father of days gone by.

But of course stang is also the name that witches give to the furca or forked pole that represents the Horned God. So you can't help but feel that there's something special—or amusing, at least—about driving down “Stang” Road.

Then he came to the intersection with Thirteenth Street.

“Meet me at the corner of Thirteenth and Stang.” Sounds like a line from a bad Witch novel, probably by some hack like Steve Posch.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Well Steven you've told a lot of stories over the years. Perhaps this is a call to gather the stories and put them in a book. Th

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Moving the Longstones

I don't know how you go about moving standing stones where you live.

Here's what we do around here.

In these things, of course, it's always best to start in a sacred way.

Before the day's work begins, we gather around the stone. We lay out the eventual foundation offerings on the foot of the longstone. Then we pass around a horn of beer, and everyone takes a sip.

The rest of the beer we pour out over the stone.

Then we pack up the foundation offerings, and the day's work begins.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    http://witchesandpagans.com/pagan-culture-blogs/paganistan/13-different-ways-of-reverencing-a-standing-stone.html
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Macha, this is a splendid idea. The genius of the paganisms has always and everywhere been to be religions of the here, and nothin
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Since we now have an outdoor space, I'm going to see if the men in our circle at San Quentin want to do something similar on a muc
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Wonderful! Thanks for sharing.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I should add that we've taken to doing the same little ceremony at the end of the work day, as well.
13 Different Ways of Reverencing a Standing Stone

Bow to it.

Touch it.

Kiss it.

Embrace it.

Anoint it.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Raising the Bull Stone

Why do they call it the Bull Stone?

Not difficult.

There's a golden bull buried underneath. That's why they call it the Bull Stone.

Well, that's what they say.

 

Recently the warlocks converged on Sweetwood Temenos in the heart of America's Witch Country, among the hollow hills of the Midwest's Driftless Area, to site the shrine that we'd like to build there.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Standing Stones

What's more pagan than a standing stone?

I say, let's raise them all over the place. Front yards, back yards, large, small, public, private, no matter. We need our standing stones. A landscape needs its standing stones. Shrines. Axes mundi. Herms. Facts on the ground.

Garland them, wreathe them, anoint them, rub them with ocher. Lay offerings at their feet. Wrap them (yes, I've seen it done) in strings of lights. Dance around them. Pray to them. Standing stones.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    When I was going to Virginia Commonwealth University back in the 80's there was a book on phallic stones in Japan. I just looked
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Sounds like a good ritual, Anthony. I'd love to be there! The ancient Semitic cultures were big on standing stones. Unlike Englis
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    When you asked what could be more pagan than setting up a standing stone. I immediately thought of the Biblical patriarch Jacob a
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Novelist Alan Garner (Brisingamen, Owl Service, et al.) writes that in the part of Cheshire he comes from, every standing stone ha
  • Linda Boeckhout
    Linda Boeckhout says #
    I love standing stones. They represent both cultural and geological history of the land (as they are often found where a glacier u

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