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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Minoan
Leap! A Love Story: Reading from a Minoan gay romance

I've shared readings from my other novels on YouTube, so I figured I should do likewise for my latest work of fiction, Leap! A Love Story. It's my first foray into romance, and of course it has a Minoan theme. It's set in Phaistos, the second-largest Minoan city (after Knossos) in about the year 1650 BCE, a generation or two before the Thera eruption.

The main character is Adelphos, the Cattle Master of Phaistos. He's in charge of the temple's herds, including the bulls that are trained for leaping. Which puts him in regular contact with the bull leapers, one of whom catches his eye.

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The Turn of the Year: Autumn Equinox

In the Ariadne's Tribe sacred calendar, we've just made our way through the Mysteries and are awaiting the arrival of the Autumn Equinox this Saturday, 23 September.

What does this date signify in our sacred calendar?

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Tasty Treats, Minoan Style

Food is such an important facet of human culture and a great way to connect with others. It's also a fabulous way to make a long-ago culture feel more real.

I've shared about Minoan food and cooking before, here and hereToday, I'm going to go all "ancient food blogger" on you with an actual recipe.

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  • Calysta Rose
    Calysta Rose says #
    oh this sounds delicious! I'll have to try this soon ty!

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Rockin' Religion: The Minoan Baetyl Ritual

Considering that we can't read the Linear A records the Minoans left behind, we know a surprising amount about their religious practices. Much of it is what we would expect from a Bronze Age culture in the Mediterranean and adjacent regions: processions, libations, temples, shrines. The art and archaeology tell us as much.

But some of the Minoans' religious practices were distinct from their neighbors'.

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Sacred Smoke: Minoan Incense

We Pagans love our incense! That has been the case for a very, very long time. As you might expect, the Minoans also enjoyed incense, and plenty of it.

The fresco above is from the West House in Akrotiri. It shows a young girl adding what looks like saffron threads to an incense burner. We know she's a girl because of her unnaturally white skin. And we know she's not an adult because of her hair - it's shaved, with a few long locks, an indication of a person who has not yet come of age.

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Minoan Ritual: Entering the Temple

The thing about spiritual practices is that that you have to actually practice them. Which means you need methods, formats, structures.

In Ariadne's Tribe, we have a ritual format that we use to celebrate our connection with the Minoan deities. I had the pleasure of sharing it with the delightful folx at Mystic South last weekend. I hope to get to do another, more colorful ritual next year.

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Lilies: The Quintessential Minoan Flower

When you mention the phrase "Minoan flower," most people immediately think of lilies. Yes, the saffron crocus was very important to the Minoans - in their religion, their art, and their economy - but somehow lilies have taken the spotlight. And with good reason.

They're beautiful, for one thing. Just look at that image above! It's a portion of the Spring fresco from Akrotiri, showing a typical springtime scene of red lilies blooming and swallows returning from their winter migration to Africa. These are probably wild Turk's cap lilies (Lilium martagon) which are native to the Mediterranean.

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