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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Wyrd

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 Texture

Their falling-out had been terrible: so much so that when the woman who had brought her into the Old Ways died, she did not attend her funeral.

She knew, immediately, that this had been a colossal mistake, that by cherishing her anger over doing right, she had torn a rent in the fabric of being.

But what was there to be done?

 

“How did you know Hilary?”

It's the kind of question one asks after funerals.

Her answer surprises me.

“Actually, I didn't know her,” she says.

The woman tells me the story. She tells me that, ever since, when she hears of a pagan elder's death, she has made it a priority to attend the funeral.

Call it reweaving.

 

A rent in the fabric of being can never be unmade.

No: but it can be repaired.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 Iron age, Celtic clothing, Loom

 

Everyone was surprised when Bob died.

Not only was he the youngest of the siblings, but—as he himself would have acknowledged—his reputation as the family health nut was well-earned.

Bob didn't smoke or drink. His diet put everyone to shame. He ran several marathons a year.

When he died at 50, no one could believe it.

The autopsy explained it all.

Unknown to anyone, including himself, Bob had been born with a congenital heart defect. Under normal circumstances, he would have been dead by the age of 30.

By his actions, he'd bought himself an extra 20 years of life.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Spatial Anomaly

On our way back from a trip to the Jeffers Petroglyphs in SW Minnesota, a friend and I passed a road sign: New Ulm 5.

New Ulm is a historically German town at the confluence of the Cottonwood and Minnesota Rivers, best known for its fine local beers and its "Herman the German" Memorial.

“I've always wanted to check out New Ulm,” said my friend.

“We'll have to go some time,” I replied.

A few miles later, we passed another road sign.

New Ulm 5.

“That's weird,” said one of us.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

The story of the karmadillo could be a parable, except that it's true. It perfectly illustrates the concepts of wyrd and orlog.

Wyrd is basically the law of cause and effect. Orlog is the layers of past action that affect current action. Past actions that affected this situation include someone in the man's society inventing a firearm, the firearm company selling firearms, the man buying one-- which implies all the past actions from the man's ancestors moving to America to the man getting a job which paid him enough to buy the home where this happened and have enough money left to buy a gun and ammunition for it-- and on the other side of the equation, all the many actions of nature that resulted in the evolution of an animal with a bulletproof armor hide.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The New Pagan Economy

“Hi, this is Julie calling from Such-and-So Bank. I'm looking for Steven Posch?”

Uh-oh. The bank is calling, but Julie sounds amazingly chipper. Something's not right.

“Speaking,” I say, dubiously.

“Congratulations, Mr. Posch! You've won this year's drawing for a free organic turkey!”

I start to laugh, partly in relief, and partly in amused appreciation of Wyrd and her screwy sense of humor. Ah, the cussedness of things.

“Mr. Posch?” Julie sounds puzzled. Obviously this isn't the reaction that she expected.

“Sorry,” I finally manage to get out. “Of course it makes perfect sense that the vegetarian would win the drawing for the turkey, right?”

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I'm sure I've mentioned this before but the universe does seem to love irony. I hope your coven-mates enjoy the surprise. I am o

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Great Rite of the Moment

In the end, the goddess and god of the witches are Being and Being-in-Duration: Mother Nature and Father Time, one might say.

And we live in the Great Rite of the Moment.

We think of Time as composed of Past, Present, and Future.

But that's not how the ancestors saw it.

Their archaic world-view is preserved in the English tense system.

The Old Language of the Hwicce—the original Anglo-Saxon Tribe of Witches—had only two “tenses”: past and non-past.

That's why we say I was and I am, but when we want to talk about what has not yet happened, we have to say I will be.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thinking Third Thoughts

Robert Cochrane (1931-1966), father of the contemporary Old Craft movement, was wont to say that the true name of the witch goddess is Fate (Cochrane 25). Yet he writes to Joseph Wilson in 1966 that the “prime duty of the Wise” is to “overcome fate” (Cochrane 23).

What is one to make of this?

Permit me to draw on the traditional vocabulary of the Elder Witcheries and to reframe the discussion in terms of “Wyrd.” Wyrd was anciently seen both as a goddess and as the inherent pattern of things: what Is, the sum total of everything that has happened until now, and the cumulative momentum towards the future inherent in that pattern. In the most abstract sense, one could say that the witches' goddess is Being, as the witches' god is Duration: in effect, Mother Nature and Father Time.

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