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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Trump

Image result for washington dc capitol building night 

AP: Washington DC

Why the Republican cowardice?

On the eve of the vote which will, in all likelihood, end with Senate Republicans once again shamefully failing to impeach disgraced ex-president Ronald Rump for crimes of which he is transparently guilty, many Americans will be wondering: why do Republican members of Congress so often seem to lack even the slightest amount of courage or moral conviction? In fact, there's a very good reason.

None of them have spines.

In 1989, a little-known statute was passed by Republican leadership that requires all incoming Congressional Republicans to undergo surgical removal of their spines before their term of service begins.

“It's a relatively simple procedure,” says Dr. Mark McKinney, a DC surgeon who, over the course of almost four decades, has performed the operation on more than 150 Republican Senators- and Representatives-elect, “and we fit them for the brace that enables them to stand upright at the same time.”

He adds that some also choose to have optional lobotomies performed at the same time.

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One of the things that astounds me about the human animal is our stubborn will to believe, even in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

Case in point: the Turin “Shroud.”

Dating to the mid-14th century, the so-called shroud is a 14-foot piece of linen displaying what appears to be the imprint of a man's naked body, fore and aft. As a quick web search will show you, many, many people continue to believe that this is the actual burial cloth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They continue to believe this in spite of the fact that three separate C-14 tests performed in three different laboratories in 1988 proved the cloth to be of medieval origin.

They continue to believe this in spite of the fact that, counter to all historical likelihood, the figure shown on the cloth looks exactly like conventional Western representations of Jesus.

They continue to believe this despite the fact that an actual human body laid out on a cloth wouldn't produce an imprint looking anything like what we see on the “shroud.”

 

 

Take a look at the image's “butt,” (lower right). Looks like a (skinny) butt, right?

(“I've seen Jesus' butt. Now I can die happy,” a Christian friend recently quipped.)

 

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Here it is: http://witchesandpagans.com/pagan-culture-blogs/paganistan/stories-that-tell-themselves.html
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    ...who, as he was burning at the stake, turned his face toward the cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris, beneath which (as we now know
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    In "The Second Messiah" by Christopher Knight & Robert Lomas the authors argue that the figure on the shroud is actually Jacques d
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Love it!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Trump's Role in Capitol Riot May Figure in Criminal Probe - Bloomberg

 

Contains sexual content

 

Call it the “honor system.”

Most traditional societies were—and are—societies of honor.

In such societies, honor—also called reputation or name—is an important motivator of action. In these societies, one acts in such as way as to preserve one's honor, whether individual or collective, and tends to avoid acting dishonorably to avoid the resultant shame.

The opposite of honor is a state that the Old English-speaking Hwicce, the original Tribe of Witches, called níð: dishonor.* One who behaved dishonorably was known as a ðing or—even more cutting because it's diminutive—a níðling.

None of these words survived into Modern English, having been replaced by Norman French instead. (In any given society, the moneyed/ruling classes are the ones who can best afford to be preoccupied with matters of honor.**) If they had, we would today speak of nithe (rhymes with writhe), and know the nitheful as nithings (r. writhings) or nithlings.

For the ancestors, what was considered nitheful was frequently non-normative behavior. In societies with strong gender-role categories, the paradigmatic act of nithe for a man would have been to experience receptive sex, especially willingly. (Some, of course, would still see it this way.)

Nowadays our ideas of what constitutes nitheful behavior have changed in major ways; but in neo-traditional communities—like the pagan community—the concepts of name and nithe are still important.

What do other people say about you? If you give your word, do you keep it? Can others trust you?

Those seeking current examples of nithe and the nitheful will have not far to look.

  • Twice-impeached loser one-term president Donald Trump is a nithling of the worst sort. On current evidence, this is a man—to use the term loosely—who has never once, in his entire life, behaved with honor.
  • All those spineless Republicans (and Democrats, for that matter) who, throughout his mis-administration, have cravenly enabled this nithling president, are themselves despicable nithings and well deserve our opprobrium.
  • All those who broke into the American Capitol, who left their trash on its floors, who defecated in its corners: all are nithlings, one and all.
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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    The Bigger the Lie, the bigger the shame.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    There is no honor without honesty.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs


Trump campaign attempts to remove satirical cartoon from online retailer |  Comics and graphic novels | The Guardian

 

Trumpery
n. pl. -ies

1. Showy but worthless finery; bric-a-brac.

2. Nonsense: rubbish.

3. Deception; trickery; fraud.

—adj.  Showy but valueless.

[Middle English trompery,

from Old French tromperie,

from tromper, to cheat.]

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As the Way of the Serpent Among Reeds:  A Political Fable for the Covid Era

Concerned about the rise of China, the Senate Republicans sent a question to the Great Oracle of Paganistan:

What will happen if Donald Trump becomes president?

A week later, they received their answer.

If you elect Donald Trump, a mighty nation will fall.

Whew, said the Senate Republicans, and they all voted for Trump.

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I Dreamt Donald Trump Is My Roomate

I could no longer stand the hate I felt for people who hate. 

 

The night of July 5, 2018, I had the strangest dream. Instead of living in my sweet house, I was living in a large apartment, and Donald Trump was my flatmate. We weren’t lovers, we were buddies. The degree to which I have loathed the 45th and everything he stands for makes the dream quite strange, given that he and I got along quite well in the dream.

 

In the dream, we were talking, and then I accidentally bumped up against him, and it seemed like his little penis was hard, but he didn’t even blink. Of course, Trump would not blink because he is a sly, awful man. He‘d leave me in that oh-so-awful-and-prevalent feminine quandary of endlessly debating with oneself, wondering things like “Am I just imagining things ...?" But I brushed his behavior off because neither his slyness nor anything else about him was bothering me. Remarkable dream for me!

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Brianne
    Brianne says #
    Francesca, Once again you hit home. This article is so timely for me, its been pointed out to me recently that the hatred I have
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Brianne, thank you for sharing your experience about hate and helplessness. Thank you also for your kind words. Your comment is e
“And God Said It Was So”: Donald Trump Is the Spittin' Image of Bad Theology by Carol P. Christ

I try very hard this election season to avoid reading about, watching, or listening to Donald Trump: the man is a liar, a cheat, a bully, a narcissist, a racist, a sexist, the list goes on. Yet even progressive commentators are talking almost exclusively about him. And now I am joining them--despite my best intentions.

Reflecting on why facts seem to matter so little to Trump, Patricia J. Williams characterizes his campaign as an exercise in one-way communication:

Freedom of expression is reduced to an arbitrary insistence upon one-way communication, a barked order. Making America “great again,” by this measure, is a command, not a hope. . . This assumption—the belief that communication flows in one direction only, that it is the role of some to speak and others only to listen—is a paradox that stifles rather than encourages debate.

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