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Archangel Protection Rite: Angelica Hex Breaker

Whenever you are going through a hard time or have fears for your family, try this ritual. Angelica, also called the “Heavenly Guardian Flower,” is said to first bloom on Archangel Michael’s name day. This positive plant is part of the carrot family and is a tall, hollow-stemmed plant with umbrella-shaped clusters of pale white flowers, tinged with green. Candying the stalks in sugar was an old-fashioned favorite, and was also traditionally used to cure colds and relieve coughs. Nowadays, seeds are used to make chartreuse, a digestive and uniquely tasty liqueur. This guardian flower is a protector, as one might expect for a plant associated with archangels, and is used to reverse curses, break hexes and fend off negative energies. Drying and curing the root is a traditional talisman, and it can be carried in your pocket or in an amulet to bring a long life. Many a wise woman has used angelica leaves in baths and spellwork to rid a household of dark spirits. If the bad energy is intense, burn the angelica leaves with frankincense to exorcise them from your space. While you are protecting yourself and your home from negativity during this angelica smudging session, you will also experience heightened psychism. Pay close attention to your dreams after this; important messages will come through.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Protection Charm

Protection charm

 

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Good Witch v. Bad Witch: Looking After Baby
Dear GW/BW

I need some help. I need advice on a protection spell. I fear someone may be trying to manipulate people and things to try to take my child away and I want to take every possible precaution.

Merideth
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Rites of Spring: German Easter Traditions

Osterfeuer in Rugen, Wikimedia Commons

While the word Easter has long been used to denote the Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Christ, I see no problem also using it to refer to the pagan holiday celebrating the return of spring. Aside from the secular aspects of contemporary Easter traditions that are less focused on resurrection and salvation and more on fertility – eggs, rabbits, chicks, etc. – the very word Easter is pre-Christian in origin (the original Christian holiday name is the Hebrew Paschal).

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bride's Breastplate

What follows is a modern prayer cast along traditional lines.

As a magical prayer of shielding and protection—hence the title—it could, of course, be made to any god or goddess.

But in this midwinter season, to Whom better should one make it than to Herself, Bride of Brides?

And even better it be, made thrice.

 

Bride's Breastplate

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Sacred Guardians: A Minoan-Themed Protection Spell

Today I'm sharing a spell/ritual from the new second edition of my book Ancient Spellcraft. It calls on the power of the griffin, an ancient mythological creature of great power. We have recently rediscovered the Minoan sun goddess Therasia and come to realize that the griffins are hers. If you like, you can call on her directly as you perform this ceremony. I do recommend that you develop a relationship with any deity you call on for spells and rituals, since they're not cosmic vending machines (you put in an offering and out pops a goodie).

 

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Okeanos Speaks

Okeanos’s Story

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Kim
    Kim says #
    What a lovely telling of the myth & spell. Thank you.
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Looking forwaaad to it, many thanks! Enjoy your conference. Blessed Be, Tasha
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Really nice! Thanks for sharing. Blessed Be, Tasha
  • Sara Mastros
    Sara Mastros says #
    You're quite welcome, Tasha! There will be more about his wife, Tethys, in the next week or two. It might be later than usual, bec

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