PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Post-apocalypse fiction

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

If you read only one pagan novel this year, let it be Paul Kingsnorth's The Wake.

The emergence of post-apocalypse narrative in early “twenty-first” century fiction, cinema, and television is an intriguing and suggestive phenomenon, offering rich possibilities for satire, cultural critique, and reflection on direction for possible futures. (I have written previously about the genre in modern pagan fiction.)

But of course, as every pagan knows, when it comes to Apocalypse, we've already been there and done that. In human history, Ragnarok comes again and again. This is how Kingsnorth can characterize his novel, now newly released in the US and currently long-listed for the prestigious Booker Prize, as “a post-apocalyptic novel set 1000 years in the past.”

Imagine that you've lost everything: your home, your possessions, your family, your culture itself, even your gods. This is the tale that Kingsnorth tells in The Wake. The year is 1066.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Nancy Chase
    Nancy Chase says #
    I definitely think the book speaks a warning for modern times, in the voice of the distant past. Reading between the lines, so mu
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Glad to hear it, Nancy, and good reading to you. It's an honest book, emotionally difficult, and the fact that Buccmaster is no gr
  • Nancy Chase
    Nancy Chase says #
    Thank you for this review! I bought the book and started reading it last night. Already I can tell what a masterpiece it is. I

Marvin Kaye and Parke Godwin, Masters of Solitude (1978)

After an invasion from China destroys the US, the megalopolis that covers the East Coast walls itself off from the wilderness to the West, where deer-like witches breed for psychic skills and create a genuine American witchery. Part of the fun is seeing what witch vocabulary might turn into in a few hundred years or so. (I don't need lep or a thammy to wish you a happy Grannog.) But those nasty coal-digging Kriss just keep cooking up toxic bugs to kill off the evil devil-worshipers. What to do?

Favorite line: “Who you callin' 'cowan'?”

Last modified on

Gerhard Hauptmann, The Island of the Great Mother (German Edition: Die Insel der grossen Mutter) (1925)

A boatload of women, but no men, are shipwrecked on a tropical island paradise. Together they create a flourishing women's civilization. One by one, by some mysterious property of the island itself, the women begin to become pregnant. Catch: half the children are girls, half boys. What to do with the boys?

A troubling, insightful, and prophetic novel.

Last modified on

Additional information