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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Mother Nature

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Aloe: Skin-Soothing Solution

One of Mother Nature’s most effective healers is aloe. When I lived in colder areas with frost and snow, I grew aloe in a wide pot with good drainage and placed it in the sunniest spot in the kitchen, where it thrived with very little water. I am truly fortunate to live where it never gets below freezing, so I have a towering aloe in the left garden corner that is growing to tree-like proportions. When anyone in the household gets a burn, a bug bite, a rash, a scratch, an itch, or a sunburn, I march back and grab a piece, slice parallel with its flat side, and apply the juice liberally. We use it as a medicine as well as a beauty application for facials, hair gel, and skin massage and feel so blessed that all this heavenly healing is utterly free of cost. Aloe propagates through baby plants sprouting off the sides; you can repot the “babies” into little clay containers and give them as gifts to your circle to share the healing energy as well as protection and luck

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Something to Howl About

 Earth Day is here, and in many globally conscientious folks’ minds out there, every day should really be dedicated to Mother Earth and treating her well. Even if you hadn’t had time over the weekend to participate in a riverside cleanup or other related project, simply getting outside, going for a walk, and picking up a piece of trash to deposit in its proper receptacle, is one small act of kindness that does make a difference that you can perform. I’d also add chatting up a neighborhood squirrel or robin, just for the heck of it. These suggestions are actually brought up in a lovely part two of a conversation with my podcast guest, Stacy Schuerman, on the latest episode of Women Who Howl at the Moon.

 You’ll notice that Women Who Howl has its own SoundCloud page now, for newer episodes from 2024. This is part of a transition phase, where all new episodes will be moving to Podbean, and in turn, becoming more readily available to folks on Spotify and iTunes, broadening our podcast audience. The older archived episodes will still all live at “Scenes From a Soundtrack,” SoundCloud page, for your listening pleasure. Stacy is a psychic, medium, and spiritualist who is always a pleasure to listen to. Be sure to check out her episode. You can find out more about Stacy at: https://www.spiritualiststacy.com/

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Seductive Sorcery: Mother Nature’s Beauty Secrets

The best beauty secrets are often hidden among Mother Nature’s flora and fauna. Forget spending a fortune on overpriced creams, lotions, masks, and salves, go out to your kitchen garden or check your pantry for organic remedies and common beauty solutions. Here are some of the best recipes and natural ingredients to begin a journey toward a healthy and nontoxic beauty regime.

Venus’ Very Vanilla Sugar Scrub

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Green Thumb Thursday Spell

On a Thursday, as the moon waxes, light green and purple candles anointed with pure lotus or sandalwood oil. Place a small ivy or fern on your altar, along with a glass of fresh water containing a pearl or piece of jade. Burn a stick of sandalwood incense in a pot of soil placed at the altar’s north quadrant and meditate on your hopes and dreams.

When the incense has burned down, place the plant in the larger container, then bow and pray:

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Service to Mother Earth: A Walking Meditation
As you walk, take the time to look and really see what is in your path. For example, my friend Brenda takes a bag with her and picks up every piece of garbage in her path. She does this as an act of love for the earth. During the ten years I have known her, she has probably turned a mountain of garbage into recycled glass, paper and plastic. Goddess bless!
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I caught the tail end of an interview with a non-pagan naturalist this morning. Much of what he had to say sounded, to my ear, very pagan.

(Note: The term “Nature” is profoundly conceptually problematic; I use it here for convenience only.)

  • Humanity comes out of “Nature.”
  • Because of this, humanity harbors a deep nostalgia for “Nature.”
  • Humanity's environmental destructiveness arises out of our disregard for—or unlove of—“Nature.”
  • Instilling a sense of love for “Nature” is the most effective way to undo humanity's current trajectory of eco-suicide.

In this Age of Covid, many non-religious people have been rediscovering what pagans have always known: the consolation of “Nature.” “Nature” heals.

The religions called “pagan” have always known this and, in their fullest realization—be it acknowledged that revival paganism in particular often falls far short of this mark—still do.

Unsurprisingly, I would contend that pagan naturalists have a number of advantages over non-religious naturalists. Of the top, I can think of three.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Hear, hear!
Nature as Classroom for Healers: Herbal Cures

Centuries ago, healers were the wise women of the village, the healers and midwives who could halt a fever with a poultice or hasten the setting of bones by concocting medicinal tea. The lore of growing and gathering healing herbs has been passed down for hundreds of years. A learned healer knows which phases of the moon are best for planting seeds, how to plan your garden by the stars, and how to create spells for health and harmony. In the grand tradition, I learned at the knee of my aunt Edith, a very wise woman who would take me for walks through the woods and show me the uses and meanings of every flower, weed, and tree. From her, I learned that lovely Queen Anne’s lace is, in fact, wild carrot; that pokeberries make the finest blood-red inks; and which meadow greens and shade-loving mushrooms are safe for a noonday salad. I was in awe during our tromps through the woods, walking mule upon mile to map every acre and spy every specimen.

 Nature was our cathedral, our classroom, and our calendar. Every spring, we could mark April I by the blossoming of a solitary clump of delicate Dutchman’s breeches amid a raft of rarest wildflowers. I thought Aunt Edith was teaching me about plants and trees, only to discover years later that she had shown me the sanctity of life and passed on a legacy I now treasure and pass on to you.

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