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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in ley lines

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Ley Lady, Ley

They say that Minneapolis has the highest per capita pagan population in the US.

Assuming that that's true (who knows?), then I live in the Most Pagan Neighborhood in the Most Pagan City in the country.

Alas, though: I cannot claim to live on the Most Pagan Street.

Just why there should be so many pagans living on 10th Avenue South is something of a mystery.

As for the neighborhood, that's easy. Thirty-forty years ago, when the local community was first getting to its hooves, this part of South Minneapolis was a marginal area, poised to go down. For this reason, there was lots of early “20th” century architectural character going for reasonable prices, so the Pagan Urban Pioneers moved in. (I was one.) Pagans being a clannish sort of people, once there were a few, others soon followed.

As for just why so many of us ended up buying on 10th Avenue, though...well, that's one for the oracles.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Real Leys

Pagans can be a notoriously credulous lot, but me, I don't come from believing people, and I'm not a believer myself. Among the things that I don't believe in (astrology, an afterlife, Christian charity...) are leys.

I simply don't see the point of believing in ley-lines that exist only in imagination when, in fact, virtually all of us are surrounded by real-world lines on the landscape.

They're called trackways, or greenways.

I live on one such myself. These days it's paved over and called Lake Street, South Minneapolis' major east-west artery. But originally, it was an old Indian track that led from the winter village at Bde Maká Ska—White Earth Lake—down to the Mississippi River. And back again, of course.

Pretty much everywhere has old trackways of this sort, contouring along the Land from one important place to another. Probably most of them were old animal trails first and became human trails later.

“Much has been written of travel, far less of the road.” So begins Edward Thomas' lyrical book The Icknield Way, his biography of the ancient greenway that runs NE-SW across England from Norfolk to Wiltshire. Named for the Iceni—Boudicca's people—the Icknield way leads Thomas on a lyrical journey through history, lore, and Land. First published in 1930, it has never since been out of print.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Back in my angst-filled days as a teen warlock-in-training, I used to go down to the woods by Lake Erie and walk the deer-paths in
  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    As it happens, the house I grew up in sits atop one of the highest points in the county on the farm my elders bought when they mov

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Portals of Light On Earth

Portals of Light On Planet Earth, as told me by the 13 Spirit Grandmothers Time who are ancient adepts that birthed the Earth eons ago when the continents first split apart.

Canada: Quebec, most of southern Quebec, near the Great Lakes, and in northern Ontario especially Lake Superior and northern Manitoba.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Greenways

i.

They call them the greenways.

They're prehistoric trackways that thread their way across the landscape. The famous Ridgeway, which follows the line of ridges across the heart of southern England, is said to be more than 5000 years old. It is part of the old Icknield Way, named for the Keltic Iceni tribe of more than 2000 years ago. (Boudicca was queen of the Iceni.)

In fact, such greenways exist all over the world. I live just a few feet from one myself.

These days Lake Street isn't very green. It looks pretty much like any four-lane main drag in America, lined with mom-pop eateries (where these days you can get tripe soup, corn fungus tacos, and whole roast guinea pig), convenience stores, and halal groceries.

But beneath the pavement runs the old Indian trail that led from the Dakota summer village on Bde Maka Ska ("White Earth Lake," latterly known as Lake Calhoun) down to the Mississippi. The old tracks often lead to water.

The greenways were the true ley-lines of old. Beneath the asphalt, they still pulse with ancient power.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Ley Lines of Life

Ripe Woman


Even in the land
of the starving
barren of nurturing
connection
of communal cohesion
and direction for
the lost children

I gathered
what bits of
connection
I could find
built and grew
made and found
meaning

My ripe fullness
can be painful
waiting to be
picked and made
useful
bursting with fine
synthesis

I dream of others
connected
in our similar
seed-bearing readiness
across the wasted
civilization
ley lines of life

...
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PaganNewsBeagle Earthy Thursday Oct 9

It's earthy Thursday here at the Pagan News Beagle -- let's dig deep and get dirty! Today's stories include amazing mushrooms; neolithic burial -- now available!; hope for the Monarch butterfly?; living breakwaters and other new ideas in conservation and remediation; a guide to Earth's major chakras.

This slideshow includes photos of twenty five of the most amazing mushrooms I've ever seen. Wow!

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