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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in hex

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Uncle Hugo's 1974-2020

An empire of the imagination, Uncle Hugo's Science Fiction Bookstore, the US's oldest (and only surviving) independent science fiction/fantasy bookstore was not only a well-loved local landmark, but a site of pilgrimage for readers all over the Midwest as well.

Now it's gone.

(It also had the grungiest men's room in the Midwest, which—on the evidence of it—had never once been cleaned since the store was founded in 1974. Ah, fandom.)

An unknown arsonist or arsonists burned it to rubble and ash on the night of Friday, May 29, in the arson that has stalked the first George Floyd protests here in the Twin Cities like a withering shadow.

I stand on the sidewalk before the hollow cave of the ruins. Strata of burned books carpet what was once the basement floor.

Touchingly, some people have left flowers. I, however, am here for another purpose.

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  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    If I could have levitated my body off this cruel and inexplicable world yesterday, even if it would have meant a cold and breathle
The Sears of Death: An Urban Witch Story

Nowadays it's called Midtown Exchange and Global Market: a lively and successful gathering of lofts, restaurants, and ethnic specialty shops.

But more than 30 years ago, when I moved into the neighborhood, everyone in the area knew it as the Sears of Death.

A kind of shadow hung over the place. Inside, the light was always dim, the air always felt cold and kind of clammy, and everything, even new things, looked somehow tired, gray, and colorless.

Here's why.

 

Year: 1928. In Minneapolis, Minnesota, Sears is proudly opening its newest landmark outlet: an Art Deco skyscraper, clad in shining golden limestone, carved in Celtic Revival style.

On opening day, a shabby old woman shambles up to the doughnut counter in the front lobby.

“Give me a dozen doughnuts,” she mumbles, carefully laying out twelve pennies on the counter.

The clerk looks at her a little askance: the woman is dressed in tattered layers of mismatched clothing and smells pretty rank. Nowadays we would assume that she's homeless.

Still, a sale is a sale. The clerk dutifully puts twelve doughnuts into the bag, closes the top, and holds it out to the old woman.

“That's only twelve,” says the old woman, “I want a dozen.”

She's missing a number of teeth, and it's hard to understand what she says.

“Twelve is a dozen,” says the clerk, with opening day primness.

“A dozen is thirteen,” the old woman tells her. “That's what they give at the bakery.”

“Well, this isn't the bakery,” says the clerk. “Here, a dozen is twelve.”

The old woman takes her bag and goes off, muttering.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Virus-in-Chief: An Anti-Tr0mp Charm

A Reminder to the Wise:

Spells are best used in conjunction with, not instead of, more direct action (such as voting).

 

Speaking of noxious opportunistic infections like the covid virus, how's about a charm to "disappear"

the Virus-in-Chief?

 

T  R  U  M  P           T  R  U  M  P

R  U  M  P             R  U  M  P

U  M  P                  U  M  P

M  P                   M  P

P                       P

T  R  U  M  P

R  U  M  P

U  M  P

M  P

P

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
But the Witch Says....

The baby is sick.

Go with the flow, says one.

It's the will of God, says another.

Keep it warm and give it some of this, says the witch.

 

I'm pregnant and I don't want another child.

Go with the flow, says one.

It's the will of God, says another.

Drink this three times a day until you've shed it, says the witch.

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  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    I love this
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    SO MOTE IT BE!
Every Spell Works Two Ways: In Which Our Coven Casts Its Very First Hex

We started by turning off every light in the house.

Every coven worth its wood* has a story to tell about its first hex.

Here's ours.

The group had been together for not quite a year when we decided to move in together. The next nine months were some of the most difficult—and also some of the most gratifying—of my life. Much of what we've been doing together ever since was first gestated during those nine fateful months.

One cold day in January I got a call at work. There'd been a break-in.

That night was Hex Night.

First we went through the house and turned off every light.

Then, in the dark temple, we pounded out a slowly mounting cacophony of rage.

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  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    for a good hex, you require only two things: Great need, and powerful intent. Well done.
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Great, as always. Love to Prodea.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
13 Things That I Love About Witches

Gods, I love witches.

I love that some of us have seen fit to hex our embarrassment of a president.

I love that some of us have seen fit to hex our embarrassment of a president publicly.

I love that some of us disapprove of hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we fight about hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that no one questions whether or not it's possible to hex our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we care enough either to hex our embarrassment of a president, or to disapprove of hexing our embarrassment of a president.

I love that we fight.

I love that we care.

I love that though, 100 years ago, there effectively was no Younger Witchery, we now number—worldwide—in the millions.

I love that we know how to fly.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Amazing, what you can find on the internet.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I like the picture you included with this.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How Public Hexing Works

So: first they hexed the Blowhard-in-Chief.

Now they've hexed the Dishonorable Judge Kavanaugh.

I say: good for them.

I'm not of the “An it harm none” school. Personally, I feel that the power to curse is one of the arrows in the witch's quiver, one of the powers that our gods have given us.

It's a terrible power and, as such, not one to be used lightly.

So “the witches” (and whatever your position on the subject, don't think that you're not tarred with the same brush) have publicly hexed the A-hole-in-Chief and the newest Supreme Court Injustice. If either of them knows about this—and I'd be willing to bet that they both do—their response was probably laughter.

So much the better.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Meredith Everwhite
    Meredith Everwhite says #
    Indeed, like I always say, "A witch who cannot hex, cannot heal!" As a devotee of Sedna, and not Wiccan, I am not in that particul
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I saw an issue of Fortean Times in the bookstore that asked if the Alt-Right was using chaos magic. I didn't purchase the magazin
  • Lady Bridget
    Lady Bridget says #
    Tis not irony, but simply using the beliefs of the person being hexed to do the hexing. Very old school actually, and gives me ho
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Oh the irony: According to a news report the public curse of Kavanaugh included a Christian reading. (Psalms 109) How witchy is th
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    I'm good with the public hex. It will re-enforce all the private hexes that witches have been casting this past year. It is the an

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