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The 6th Moon of the Year, July 20, 2020

 

The Strong Sun Moon is July 20.
 
It is presided over by my associate, Spirit Grandmother Badger Clan, one of 13 ancient adepts, called Spirit Grandmothers or Mothers of Time, who birthed the Earth at the Permian era. They are part of the "hierarchy of Judges",13th dimensional beings from different stars and planets, are a very high vibration.
 
She says it is time in this moon for balance, growth, greater health through the teachings of roots and medicines she planted on Earth. We planetarians have been out of balance. That results in all Earth Beings out of balance. We need to take responsibility for our health and well being, becoming our own healers.
 
Share her message widely, so that all will remember who we once were, who we can become again before Kali Yuga, this age of chaos and control descended upon us. Who may we become, who are we? Consciousness. And we need to get back to our roots, our Mother for her medicines, homeopathic medicines as well, her gifts to us. Our Creators gave us the perfect immune system. I would not let anyone tell me that they can enhance my immune system with a vaccine.
 
It is essential we get back to our roots, if we are to survive. We are at the 12th initiation of 13, according to the Spirit Grandmothers. They also recently said that humans are too slow waking up, most still living out of the three lower chakras. Share this message widely. More people need to wake up to create balance on our wobbly Earth.This is my daily prayer for 30 years. Will you make it yours?
 
We stand a chance to loose everything, everything we have gained. Then we have to go back to the beginning and start over, and it has happened approximately five times before. It is up to us to make the needed changes, WE HUMANS OF EARTH. I'm trying to do my part. Are you, my friends? I would like to suggest that once a week sit in meditation and look into your life, see what changes you could make, and how you may help others to wake up.
 
In the meantime, sing, dance, chant, touch the Earth, be joyful, for this is our heritage from Her, The Goddess, as well. InLakech.❤️-C Agnes Toews-Andrews
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
On Asafetida

Mention asafetida among a group of pagans, and someone—probably the newbie who's still trying to establish credibility—will be sure to wrinkle up her nose and say: “Ooo, that really stinks!”

She's referencing, of course, asafetida's long-standing reputation as a demonofuge. If you want to get rid of that pesky demon that you've (for whatever reason) conjured up, toss some asafetida on the coals in the censer, and just watch it dematerialize. Or whatever it is that they do.

(Now, to me, this seems counter-intuitive. One would think that demons, of all critters, would like stinky. Just goes to show how much I know about Ceremonial Magic. Or demons, for that matter.)

Even the name is stinky: Latin asa, 'gum,' + fetida, 'smelly' (cp. fetid).

In fact, asafetida is no stinkier than onions or garlic. I know because I eat it all the time.

Like most witches, I have a strong affinity for Indian food. (This makes a roundabout kind of sense; after all, what's the national food of Britain? Curry, of course.) Once used in medieval medicine, asafetida is now primarily a seasoning used in South Asian cooking.

In India, really pure vegetarians avoid—for Ayurvedic reasons—onions and garlic in their cooking, but some preparations really do require that certain foetor: hence asafetida, or hing as it's known in Hindi.

More than 20 years ago, a coven-sib gave me a pound-weight bag of asafetida that he'd bought and realized he had no use for. (Just why he bought it in the first place, I've never thought to ask.) Anyway, these decades later, I'm finally coming to the end of it. Thanks, Robin, why-ever you bought it, for the gift that has kept on giving.

I'm not sure how many grams a year that comes out to, but I suppose this fact goes some way to explaining why I smell the way I do. And—presumably—why I've had so few problems with demons down the years.

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The Healing and Magical Wizard Solomon’s Seal

The Israelite King Solomon was said to have great wisdom, and to possess a special signet or seal ring that aided him in his magic work. By medieval times, he was regarded as a great wizard. According to herbal lore, he was said to have placed his seal upon this plant when he realized its value. It is still used in herbal medicine for a range of treatments and regarded as a powerhouse. The circular scars on the rootstock, which are said to be the mark of Solomon’s seal, are actually left by the stems that die back after the growing season. During the Middle Ages, the design of the seal ring was regarded as a powerful amulet.

 

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Full Moon Winter Garden Blessing

As the days grow longer, a mild breath of air brings the promise of spring. In some areas receding snow reveals a soft haze of greening grass, while in other places droplets of ice shimmer light fairy lights on tree branches. Seeds that have been resting in the womb of Mother Earth will slowly make their way to the surface and unfurl into the sunlight. But not yet, they must be softly roused.

 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
From the garden snacks

From the garden snacks

Even if you don’t go in for the fruit and veg plot in your garden you can still grow a few herbs or even eat some of the edible flowers and add them to recipes.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Herbs are Gentle Healers

Herbs can be Used for More than Cooking

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Nettles & Mugwort

While I was reading Sylvia Townsend Warner's Lolly Willowes, a too much neglected classic of witchcraft fiction, I was struck by a rhyme Lolly's Nannie Quantrell had taught her as a child, which she had learned from her grandmother:

If they would eat nettles in March

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