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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in heathens

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Asatru FAQ: What's a Nokean?

A Nokian, or Nokean, is someone who opposes Lokeans. A Lokean is a type of pagan or heathen whose personal religious practice is primarily about following Loki. Some Lokeans also consider themselves to be Asatruars, or Wiccans, or other sects, and some don't. Asatru includes Loki in its traditional list of gods, so many Asatruars who do not consider themselves Lokeans do honor Loki, just not as their primary deity.

A Nokian actively tries to get people who follow or honor Loki to leave public heathen spaces or stay silent within them, and tries to convince people who are seeking a religious path that Loki isn't an acceptable part of heathenry. While Lokeanism is a religious practice, Nokeanism is a form of proselytizing. People who simply prefer not to acknowledge Loki and don't have a relationship with him are not Nokeans; they are just ordinary heathens, pagans, etc. who don't have Loki in their personal or group practice. A Nokean is someone who tries to control the personal and group practice of other people to get others to exclude Loki.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, it's a huge subject and I'm only just barely introducing it in my comment. The main takeaway here is that the impact of N
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I should probably have added the qualifier "currently available" to "lore and practices" though a 40 day time frame would give the
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, that's an interesting way to look at the elements. In heathen literature, there are trees considered male that poetically
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    In "Two Flutes Playing" by Andrew Ramer the author describes gay energy as tree energy and says it is represented in art and stor
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, oh, Odin is also a trickster He and Loki are very much brothers. Meredith, in one of our stories Loki enters an eating

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How to Make a Paganism

Gods, there really are pagans everywhere.

Urglaawe (pronounced OOR-glaw-veh) means “Primal Faith” in Pennsylvania “Dutch.” It's a New World Heathenry from the land of hex signs and powwowing.

Between 1683 and the War of 1812, tens of thousands of German-speaking migrants from the Palatinate and Switzerland, along with significant numbers of Silesians, Moravians, and Swabians, settled in the New World. Initially spearheaded by Mennonites and Amish seeking religious freedom, later waves consisted primarily of economic migrants. These are the Deitsch, who through the following 300 years have managed to maintain their own distinctive language and culture.

Die Deitscherei—literally, “Dutchery”—is their name for Pennsylvania Dutch Country in what is now eastern Pennsylvania and contiguous parts of Maryland and Delaware, but die Breet-Deitscherei (“Greater Dutchery”) includes those non-contiguous areas of Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Ontario with significant enclaves that self-identify as Deitsch.

Well folks, there's Heide—heathens—in Deitschland.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Magical systems just want to cross-pollinate.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I've been interested in Pennsylvania hexcraft since my dad drove us from Massachusetts to North Carolina to visit relatives back i
Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, June 2

Religious freedom is something that a lot of people talk about. But what are the actual battles being fought for those whose religious freedom is most impeded? Today for Fiery Tuesday we take a look at different ways in which minorities in the United States are fighting for their civil rights, from Pagans to Muslims to American Indians / Native Americans. Take a look!

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