PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Eleusinian Mysteries

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Mystery Night

It may be that in this time of Plague, tonight, on this Eve of Spring—whether in wisdom or in fear, who shall say?—the Rites of Spring will go uncelebrated.

Or will they?

Hear now my story.

 

September 27, 480 BCE: Mystery Night, the night on which, since time immemorial, people have gathered in Eleusis in Attica to celebrate the Mysteries of the Barley Mother and her daughter, the Nameless Bride.

But this year Eleusis and its sanctuary lie empty. The plains of Attica have been devastated by the invading Persians, and the people of Attica have evacuated to mountain refuges.

It so happens that on that day, two Greek turncoats in pay of the Persian king—Dikaios, son of Theokydes, and Demaratos of Sparta—see a great cloud of dust on the Attic plain, as if raised by the feet of 30,000, and hear massed voices shouting the holy cry: Iakkhos! Iakkhos!

But in the midst of the cloud they see nothing and no one.

What is this? asks Demaratos, who had not been initiated into the Mother's Mysteries.

Last modified on
If the Secret of Eleusis Were Revealed to You, What Would You Do?

 A Thought Experiment

 

Here it is: the only surviving text of the Mysteries of Eleusis, unlawfully committed to writing by the last hierophant after the destruction of the Sanctuary in 394 ce. After 1600 years, the Secret of Eleusis is finally revealed.

You are now the sole guardian of antiquity's most sacred mystery, knowledge of which (it is said) confers immortality.

What do you do now?

Do you guard the Mystery, or do you pass it on?

If the latter, how? Publicly, or in secret?

Do you publish the mystery, thus earning the praise of scholars everywhere, but also revealing it to the eyes of the unworthy?

Or do you remount the Mysteries? Publicly or privately? If so, how?

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tyger
    Tyger says #
    If the knowledge of the mystery gives immortality, then I would be obligated to guard the secret. Immortality is not something one
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Well... If I'm told outright by my initiator why I was ready and worthy for this revelation ( I was old enough/smart enough/decent
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    How so?
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Well...how was *I* deemed worthy to receive revelation?... It would depend on that...

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Beholding Mystery

If I had to compare our Samhain to anything, it would be to the Eleusinian Mysteries.

Of course, the comparison is inexact, and maybe even a little misleading. Certainly we did not—consciously, at any rate—structure what we do on the ancient Mysteries of the Barley Mother. In fact, although we've been enacting this ritual for more than 30 years now, the analogy with Eleusis has only just occurred to me: interestingly, as I attempted to describe it to a first-time guest.

Really, though, such a resemblance is hardly to be wondered at. That Mystery should variously speak a like tongue in different times and places should surprise no one.

As such, the immemorial principle of Holy Silence obtains. There's much that I cannot tell, nor would I if I could.

But this much I may say.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Eleusinian Impact

Ye gods.

In 37 years, we've done a lot of Samhains together. But none like this one.

Naked and cold in the dark, in the cave.

Then the light flares, and the Mystery is revealed.

Of course, I already knew what the Mystery was; Hell, I'd helped write the ritual.

And still, it hit me like a thunderbolt, like love, with an impact frankly Eleusinian.

The mystery revealed in the dark. You see it, and you know that it's true.

True.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Over and over, all around the wold, Samhain reveals itself. Happy new year, dearest!
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Amazing how similar our experiences were! There were few of us and it was cold and rainy, so instead of climbing the hill I once

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Demeter, Gaia, and the Sacred Marriage

 

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Pagan News Beagle
PaganNewsBeagle October 13

Howdy and Good Monday, Beagle fans! Today we have an Airy Monday featuring stories for looking up (astronomy) and looking into the past (archaeology.) First, in space: check out the upcoming Solar Eclipse; photos from an astronaut orbiting Earth; the supercluster Laniakea. Next, in the past: discovery of a shrine to Brigitana in England; the tomb of the father of Alexander the Great; and the great Sex and Death mystery rituals of the past.

Spectators in Western North America will be in a great position to observe the upcoming partial Solar Eclipse, reports Sky and Telescope magazine.

...
Last modified on
THE DIVINE DRAMA AND THE UNIVERSALITY OF DEATH


In Greece the liturgies of lent and especially of the week before Easter are known as the “divine drama,” in Greek theodrama.  This may refer to the “drama” of the capture, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus and to the suffering of God the Father and Mary.

However, it is important to recall that the drama in ancient Greece referred to both the tragedies and comedies, most specifically, those that were performed in the theater of Dionysios in Athens.  While we have been taught that the Greek tragedies celebrated “downfall of the hero” due to his “tragic flaw,” it is important to remember that Dionysios was the original protagonist of the Greek tragedy: it was his death and rebirth that was first celebrated.

Some have argued that the Greek tragedies should never be “read” alone, for they were always “performed” in tandem with the comedies, which were followed by the bawdy phallic humor of the satyr plays.  The tragedies end in death and irreparable loss.  But if the comedies and satyr plays are considered an integral part of the cycle, death is followed by the resurgence of life.

Last modified on

Additional information